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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of connexin32 deletion on E7 or RET/PTC3 oncogene-driven growth and neoplastic transformation of the thyroid gland.
Endocr. Relat. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2009
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Connexins (Cx) form gap junctions and allow direct cell-to-cell communication. Cx through gap junctions or by themselves play regulatory roles on cell growth and differentiation. Using genetically modified mice, we previously found that Cx32 acts as a down-regulator of growth in normal thyroid gland. In this study, we examined the impact of Cx32 ablation on oncogene-driven thyroid growth and neoplastic transformation. Cx32 knockout (Cx32-KO) mice were crossed with transgenic mice expressing, selectively in the thyroid gland, either the E7 or RET/PTC3 (RP3) oncogene. As already described, Cx32-KO mice had no detectable thyroid alteration in physiological conditions and mice expressing E7 or RP3 exhibited time-dependent thyroid hypertrophy and variable changes in expression of differentiation. The thyroid of E7 mice evolved towards a large colloid goitre whereas RP3 mice developed a hyperplastic thyroid of variable size, and the largest glands (about 40% of total) represented a profound tissue remodeling with proliferative papillary formations. E7-induced thyroid hypertrophy was reduced by about 40% in Cx32-KO mice as compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. On the contrary, thyroid hypertrophy induced by thyrotropin stimulation (in response to goitrogen treatment) was enhanced by about 40% in Cx32-KO mice as compared with WT mice. Thyroid hypertrophy of RP3 mice and the proportion of glands showing extensive tissue remodeling were drastically reduced in mice devoid of Cx32. Our data show that Cx32, which negatively controls thyroid growth activated by thyrotropin via the cAMP pathway, would act as a positive effector of thyroid growth triggered by oncogenes acting through other signaling cascades.
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Definition of genetic events directing the development of distinct types of brain tumors from postnatal neural stem/progenitor cells.
Cancer Res.
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Although brain tumors are classified and treated based upon their histology, the molecular factors involved in the development of various tumor types remain unknown. In this study, we show that the type and order of genetic events directs the development of gliomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid-like tumors from postnatal mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC). We found that the overexpression of specific genes led to the development of these three different brain tumors from NSC/NPCs, and manipulation of the order of genetic events was able to convert one established tumor type into another. In addition, loss of the nuclear chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCB1 in rhabdoid tumors led to increased phosphorylation of eIF2?, a central cytoplasmic unfolded protein response (UPR) component, suggesting a role for the UPR in these tumors. Consistent with this, application of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib led to an increase in apoptosis of human cells with reduced SMARCB1 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that the order of genetic events determines the phenotypes of brain tumors derived from a common precursor cell pool, and suggest that the UPR may represent a therapeutic target in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.