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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Complex MLL rearrangement in non-infiltrated bone marrow in an infant with stage II precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma.
Eur. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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Precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma cells are indistinguishable by morphology, and immune phenotype from lymphoblasts in acute leukemia which in infancy is associated with MLL rearrangements and a poor prognosis. The role of MLL gene deregulation in rare cases of isolated lymphoblastic lymphoma in infants is obscure. We report the case of a 10-month-old child who presented with a cutaneous nodule on the left foot. Histological diagnosis was precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The young age of the patient motivated us to investigate the presence of an MLL rearrangement.
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Genomic EWS-FLI1 fusion sequences in Ewing sarcoma resemble breakpoint characteristics of immature lymphoid malignancies.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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Chromosomal translocations between the EWS gene and members of the ETS gene family are characteristic molecular features of the Ewing sarcoma. The most common translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12) fuses the EWS gene to FLI1, and is present in 85-90% of Ewing sarcomas. In the present study, a specifically designed multiplex long-range PCR assay was applied to amplify genomic EWS-FLI1 fusion sites from as little as 100 ng template DNA. Characterization of the EWS-FLI1 fusion sites of 42 pediatric and young adult Ewing sarcoma patients and seven cell lines revealed a clustering in the 5 region of the EWS-breakpoint cluster region (BCR), in contrast to random distribution of breakpoints in the FLI1-BCR. No association of breakpoints with various recombination-inducing sequence motifs was identified. The occurrence of small deletions and duplications at the genomic junction is characteristic of involvement of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair system, similar to findings at chromosomal breakpoints in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma.
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Genome-wide analysis of histone H3 acetylation patterns in AML identifies PRDX2 as an epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor gene.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2011
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With the use of ChIP on microarray assays in primary leukemia samples, we report that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts exhibit significant alterations in histone H3 acetylation (H3Ac) levels at > 1000 genomic loci compared with CD34(+) progenitor cells. Importantly, core promoter regions tended to have lower H3Ac levels in AML compared with progenitor cells, which suggested that a large number of genes are epigenetically silenced in AML. Intriguingly, we identified peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2) as a novel potential tumor suppressor gene in AML. H3Ac was decreased at the PRDX2 gene promoter in AML, which correlated with low mRNA and protein expression. We also observed DNA hypermethylation at the PRDX2 promoter in AML. Low protein expression of the antioxidant PRDX2 gene was clinically associated with poor prognosis in patients with AML. Functionally, PRDX2 acted as inhibitor of myeloid cell growth by reducing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in response to cytokines. Forced PRDX2 expression inhibited c-Myc-induced leukemogenesis in vivo on BM transplantation in mice. Taken together, epigenome-wide analyses of H3Ac in AML led to the identification of PRDX2 as an epigenetically silenced growth suppressor, suggesting a possible role of ROS in the malignant phenotype in AML.
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Calcitonin substitution in calcitonin deficiency reduces particle-induced osteolysis.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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Periprosthetic osteolysis is a major cause of aseptic loosening in joint arthroplasty. This study investigates the impact of CT (calcitonin) deficiency and CT substitution under in-vivo circumstances on particle-induced osteolysis in Calca -/- mice.
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Impact of EWS-ETS fusion type on disease progression in Ewings sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor: prospective results from the cooperative Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 trial.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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PURPOSE EWS-ETS fusion genes are the driving force in Ewings sarcoma pathogenesis. Because of the variable breakpoint locations in the involved genes, there is heterogeneity in fusion RNA and protein architecture. Since previous retrospective studies suggested prognostic differences among patients expressing different EWS-FLI1 fusion types, the impact of fusion RNA architecture on disease progression and relapse was studied prospectively within the Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 clinical trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS Among 1,957 patients who registered before January 1, 2007, 703 primary tumors were accessible for the molecular biology study. Fusion type was assessed by polymerase chain reaction on frozen (n = 578) or paraffin-embedded materials (n = 125). The primary end point was the time to disease progression or relapse. Results After exclusion of noninformative patients, 565 patients were entered into the prognostic factor analysis comparing type 1 (n = 296), type 2 (n = 133), nontype 1/nontype 2 EWS-FLI1 (n = 91) and EWS-ERG fusions (n = 45). Median follow-up time was 4.5 years. The distribution of sex, age, tumor volume, tumor site, disease extension, or histologic response did not differ between the four fusion type groups. We did not observe any significant prognostic value of the fusion type on the risk of progression or relapse. The only slight difference was that the risk of progression or relapse associated with nontype 1/nontype 2 EWS-FLI1 fusions was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.96 to 2.0) times higher than risk associated with other fusion types, but it was not significant (P = .10). CONCLUSION In contrast to retrospective studies, the prospective evaluation did not confirm a prognostic benefit for type 1 EWS-FLI1 fusions.
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Life-threatening hypersplenism due to idiopathic portal hypertension in early childhood: case report and review of the literature.
BMC Gastroenterol
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) is a disorder of unknown etiology and is characterized clinically by portal hypertension, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism accompanied by pancytopenia. This study evaluates the pathogenic concept of the disease by a systematic review of the literature and illustrates novel pathologic and laboratory findings.
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Minireview: Malassezia infections in immunocompromised patients.
Mycoses
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2009
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Malassezia spp. form part of the normal human cutaneous flora and are implicated in several mild, but recurrent cutaneous diseases, such as pityriasis versicolor, Malassezia folliculitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis, and, with lesser frequency, a range of other dermatological disorders. Malassezia spp. have also been associated with cutaneous and systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients including folliculitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis, catheter-related fungaemia and a variety of deeply invasive infections. In this review, we provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of cutaneous and invasive Malassezia infections in immunocompromised patients.
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Treatment options for recurrent giant cell tumors of bone.
J. Cancer Res. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2009
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Although the recurrence rate of giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) is relatively high exact data on treatment options for the recurrent cases is lacking. The possible surgical procedures range from repeated intralesional curettage to wide resection.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.