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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Molecular Convergence of Neurodevelopmental Disorders.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are caused by mutations in diverse genes involved in different cellular functions, although there can be crosstalk, or convergence, between molecular pathways affected by different NDDs. To assess molecular convergence, we generated human neural progenitor cell models of 9q34 deletion syndrome, caused by haploinsufficiency of EHMT1, and 18q21 deletion syndrome, caused by haploinsufficiency of TCF4. Using next-generation RNA sequencing, methylation sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, and whole-genome miRNA analysis, we identified several levels of convergence. We found mRNA and miRNA expression patterns that were more characteristic of differentiating cells than of proliferating cells, and we identified CpG clusters that had similar methylation states in both models of reduced gene dosage. There was significant overlap of gene targets of TCF4 and EHMT1, whereby 8.3% of TCF4 gene targets and 4.2% of EHMT1 gene targets were identical. These data suggest that 18q21 and 9q34 deletion syndromes show significant molecular convergence but distinct expression and methylation profiles. Common intersection points might highlight the most salient features of disease and provide avenues for similar treatments for NDDs caused by different genetic mutations.
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A comprehensive examination of breast cancer risk loci in African American women.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2014
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Genome-wide association studies have identified 73 breast cancer risk variants mainly in European populations. Given considerable differences in linkage disequilibrium structure between populations of European and African ancestry, the known risk variants may not be informative for risk in African ancestry populations. In a previous fine-mapping investigation of 19 breast cancer loci, we were able to identify SNPs in four regions that better captured risk associations in African American women. In this study of breast cancer in African American women (3016 cases, 2745 controls), we tested an additional 54 novel breast cancer risk variants. Thirty-eight variants (70%) were found to have an association with breast cancer in the same direction as previously reported, with eight (15%) replicating at P < 0.05. Through fine-mapping, in three regions (1q32, 3p24, 10q25), we identified variants that better captured associations with overall breast cancer or estrogen receptor positive disease. We also observed suggestive associations with variants (at P < 5 × 10(-6)) in three separate regions (6q25, 14q13, 22q12) that may represent novel risk variants. Directional consistency of association observed for ?65-70% of currently known genetic variants for breast cancer in women of African ancestry implies a shared functional common variant at most loci. To validate and enhance the spectrum of alleles that define associations at the known breast cancer risk loci, as well as genome-wide, will require even larger collaborative efforts in women of African ancestry.
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Association between cytokines and methylation of SOCS-1 in serum of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
Mol. Biol. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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In this study, we aim to determine the relationship between methylation level of an inflammatory-related gene, SOCS-1 in serum samples of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and their degree of inflammation as well as serum cytokine level. Quantitative real time methylation specific PCR was performed to examine the promoter methylation of SOCS-1 in serum samples of 43 HLA-B27+ AS patients and 6 B27+ healthy controls. Degree of inflammation was accessed by spondylopathy, sacroiliitis as well as acute phase reactant, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP). Serum IL-6 and TNF-? level was determined by ELISA assay. SOCS-1 methylation can only be found in serums samples from patients but not normal control. Methylation of SOCS-1 significantly associated with severity of patient's spondylopathy (P < 0.005), sacroiliitis (P < 0.005) and acute phase reactant CRP (P = 0.0278). AS patients also exhibited higher serum IL-6 (P < 0.001) and TNF-? level (P < 0.001). Importantly, patients with high serum IL-6 or TNF-? level demonstrated a significantly higher SOCS-1 methylation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, this proof-of-principle study suggested that methylation of SOCS-1 can be detected in serum of HLA-B27+ AS patients but not in B27+ controls. The pathogenic potential of SOCS-1 methylation in AS deserves further investigation.
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Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2014
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Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA.
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Evidence for increased microglial priming and macrophage recruitment in the dorsal anterior cingulate white matter of depressed suicides.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Despite increasing evidence supporting the neuroinflammatory theory of depression, little is known about cerebral macrophages in individuals suffering from major depression. In the present study, we investigated the morphology and distribution of cells immunostained for the macrophage-specific marker ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1) in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) white matter of middle-aged depressed suicides and matched non-psychiatric controls. This region is known for its implication in mood disorders, and its white matter compartment was previously found to display hypertrophic astrocytes in depressed suicides. Distributions of IBA1-immunoreactive (IBA-IR) microglial phenotypes were assessed using stereology and cell morphometry, and blood vessels were characterized as being intimately associated with either a high or a low density of IBA1-IR amoeboid-like cells. Total densities of IBA1-IR microglia did not differ between depressed suicides and controls. However, a finer analysis examining relative proportions of microglial phenotypes revealed that the ratio of primed over ramified ("resting") microglia was significantly increased in depressed suicides. Strikingly, the proportion of blood vessels surrounded by a high density of macrophages was more than twice higher in depressed suicides than in controls, and this difference was strongly significant. Consistent with these observations, gene expression of IBA1 and MCP-1, a chemokine involved in the recruitment of circulating monocytes, was significantly upregulated in depressed suicides. Furthermore, mRNA for CD45, a marker enriched in perivascular macrophages, was also significantly increased in samples from depressed suicides. An increase compared to controls was also observed in the proportion of blood vessels surrounded by a high density of CD45-IR cells, but this difference did not reach significance. These histological and molecular data suggest the recruitment of monocytes in dACC white matter of depressed suicides, although it cannot be excluded that other types of macrophages (including microglia) account for the observed accumulation of macrophages closely associated with blood vessels. Altogether, these findings suggest that the previously reported depression- and suicide-associated increases in circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines may be associated with low-grade cerebral neuroinflammation involving the recruitment of circulating monocytes.
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BisQC: an operational pipeline for multiplexed bisulfite sequencing.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Bisulfite sequencing is the most efficient single nucleotide resolution method for analysis of methylation status at whole genome scale, but improved quality control metrics are needed to better standardize experiments.
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Precise inference of copy number alterations in tumor samples from SNP arrays.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2013
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The accurate detection of copy number alterations (CNAs) in human genomes is important for understanding susceptibility to cancer and mechanisms of tumor progression. CNA detection in tumors from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays is a challenging problem due to phenomena such as aneuploidy, stromal contamination, genomic waves and intra-tumor heterogeneity, issues that leading methods do not optimally address.
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Evaluation of hospital medication inventory policies.
Health Care Manag Sci
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2013
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As supply chain costs constitute a large portion of hospitals operating expenses and with $27.7 billion spent by the US hospitals on drugs alone in 2009, improving medication inventory management provides a great opportunity to decrease the cost of healthcare. This study investigates different management approaches for a system consisting of one central storage location, the main pharmacy, and multiple dispensing machines located in each department. Each medication has a specific unit cost, availability from suppliers, criticality level, and expiration date. Event-driven simulation is used to evaluate the performance of several inventory policies based on the total cost and patient safety (service level) under various arrangements of the system defined by the number of drugs and departments, and drugs criticality, availability, and expiration levels. Our results show that policies that incorporate drug characteristics in ordering decisions can address the tradeoff between patient safety and cost. Indeed, this study shows that such policies can result in higher patient safety and lower overall cost when compared to traditional approaches. Additional insights from this study allow for better understanding of the medication inventory systems dynamics and suggest several directions for future research in this topic. Findings of this study can be applied to help hospital pharmacies with managing their inventory.
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Sensory recovery following decellularized nerve allograft transplantation for digital nerve repair.
J Plast Surg Hand Surg
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2013
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Abstract This study reported preliminary clinical experience of using decelluarised nerve allograft material for repair of digital nerve defect in five hand injury patients. From October 2009 to July 2010, five patients with traumatic nerve defect were treated with nerve repair using AxoGen® nerve allograft (AxoGen Inc, Alachua, FL) in California Hospital Medical Center. All patients were followed at least for 12 months, and sensory recovery and signs of infection or rejection were documented by a hand therapist. Average two-point discrimination was 6 mm, and average Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments test was 4.31. No wound infections or signs of rejections were observed at wound site. All patients reported sensory improvement during the follow-up period after operation. It is believed that decellularised nerve allografts may provide a readily available option for repair of segmental nerve defect.
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Genome-wide association study of age at menarche in African-American women.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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African-American (AA) women have earlier menarche on average than women of European ancestry (EA), and earlier menarche is a risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes among other chronic diseases. Identification of common genetic variants associated with age at menarche has a potential value in pointing to the genetic pathways underlying chronic disease risk, yet comprehensive genome-wide studies of age at menarche are lacking for AA women. In this study, we tested the genome-wide association of self-reported age at menarche with common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a total of 18 089 AA women in 15 studies using an additive genetic linear regression model, adjusting for year of birth and population stratification, followed by inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis (Stage 1). Top meta-analysis results were then tested in an independent sample of 2850 women (Stage 2). First, while no SNP passed the pre-specified P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold for significance in Stage 1, suggestive associations were found for variants near FLRT2 and PIK3R1, and conditional analysis identified two independent SNPs (rs339978 and rs980000) in or near RORA, strengthening the support for this suggestive locus identified in EA women. Secondly, an investigation of SNPs in 42 previously identified menarche loci in EA women demonstrated that 25 (60%) of them contained variants significantly associated with menarche in AA women. The findings provide the first evidence of cross-ethnic generalization of menarche loci identified to date, and suggest a number of novel biological links to menarche timing in AA women.
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Analysis of Latino populations from GALA and MEC studies reveals genomic loci with biased local ancestry estimation.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Local ancestry analysis of genotype data from recently admixed populations (e.g. Latinos, African Americans) provides key insights into population history and disease genetics. Although methods for local ancestry inference have been extensively validated in simulations (under many unrealistic assumptions), no empirical study of local ancestry accuracy in Latinos exists to date. Hence, interpreting findings that rely on local ancestry in Latinos is challenging.
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A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry.
Keri L Monda, Gary K Chen, Kira C Taylor, Cameron Palmer, Todd L Edwards, Leslie A Lange, Maggie C Y Ng, Adebowale A Adeyemo, Matthew A Allison, Lawrence F Bielak, Guanjie Chen, Mariaelisa Graff, Marguerite R Irvin, Suhn K Rhie, Guo Li, Yongmei Liu, Youfang Liu, Yingchang Lu, Michael A Nalls, Yan V Sun, Mary K Wojczynski, Lisa R Yanek, Melinda C Aldrich, Adeyinka Ademola, Christopher I Amos, Elisa V Bandera, Cathryn H Bock, Angela Britton, Ulrich Broeckel, Quiyin Cai, Neil E Caporaso, Chris S Carlson, John Carpten, Graham Casey, Wei-Min Chen, Fang Chen, Yii-Der I Chen, Charleston W K Chiang, Gerhard A Coetzee, Ellen Demerath, Sandra L Deming-Halverson, Ryan W Driver, Patricia Dubbert, Mary F Feitosa, Ye Feng, Barry I Freedman, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Omri Gottesman, Xiuqing Guo, Talin Haritunians, Tamara Harris, Curtis C Harris, Anselm J M Hennis, Dena G Hernandez, Lorna H McNeill, Timothy D Howard, Barbara V Howard, Virginia J Howard, Karen C Johnson, Sun J Kang, Brendan J Keating, Suzanne Kolb, Lewis H Kuller, Abdullah Kutlar, Carl D Langefeld, Guillaume Lettre, Kurt Lohman, Vaneet Lotay, Helen Lyon, JoAnn E Manson, William Maixner, Yan A Meng, Kristine R Monroe, Imran Morhason-Bello, Adam B Murphy, Josyf C Mychaleckyj, Rajiv Nadukuru, Katherine L Nathanson, Uma Nayak, Amidou N'Diaye, Barbara Nemesure, Suh-Yuh Wu, M Cristina Leske, Christine Neslund-Dudas, Marian Neuhouser, Sarah Nyante, Heather Ochs-Balcom, Adesola Ogunniyi, Temidayo O Ogundiran, Oladosu Ojengbede, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Julie R Palmer, Edward A Ruiz-Narváez, Nicholette D Palmer, Michael F Press, Evandine Rampersaud, Laura J Rasmussen-Torvik, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Babatunde Salako, Eric E Schadt, Ann G Schwartz, Daniel A Shriner, David Siscovick, Shad B Smith, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Elizabeth K Speliotes, Margaret R Spitz, Lara Sucheston, Herman Taylor, Bamidele O Tayo, Margaret A Tucker, David J Van Den Berg, Digna R Velez Edwards, Zhaoming Wang, John K Wiencke, Thomas W Winkler, John S Witte, Margaret Wrensch, Xifeng Wu, James J Yang, Albert M Levin, Taylor R Young, Neil A Zakai, Mary Cushman, Krista A Zanetti, Jing Hua Zhao, Wei Zhao, Yonglan Zheng, Jie Zhou, Regina G Ziegler, Joseph M Zmuda, Jyotika K Fernandes, Gary S Gilkeson, Diane L Kamen, Kelly J Hunt, Ida J Spruill, Christine B Ambrosone, Stefan Ambs, Donna K Arnett, Larry Atwood, Diane M Becker, Sonja I Berndt, Leslie Bernstein, William J Blot, Ingrid B Borecki, Erwin P Bottinger, Donald W Bowden, Gregory Burke, Stephen J Chanock, Richard S Cooper, Jingzhong Ding, David Duggan, Michele K Evans, Caroline Fox, W Timothy Garvey, Jonathan P Bradfield, Hakon Hakonarson, Struan F A Grant, Ann Hsing, Lisa Chu, Jennifer J Hu, Dezheng Huo, Sue A Ingles, Esther M John, Joanne M Jordan, Edmond K Kabagambe, Sharon L R Kardia, Rick A Kittles, Phyllis J Goodman, Eric A Klein, Laurence N Kolonel, Loic Le Marchand, Simin Liu, Barbara McKnight, Robert C Millikan, Thomas H Mosley, Badri Padhukasahasram, L Keoki Williams, Sanjay R Patel, Ulrike Peters, Curtis A Pettaway, Patricia A Peyser, Bruce M Psaty, Susan Redline, Charles N Rotimi, Benjamin A Rybicki, Michèle M Sale, Pamela J Schreiner, Lisa B Signorello, Andrew B Singleton, Janet L Stanford, Sara S Strom, Michael J Thun, Mara Vitolins, Wei Zheng, Jason H Moore, Scott M Williams, Shamika Ketkar, Xiaofeng Zhu, Alan B Zonderman, , Charles Kooperberg, George J Papanicolaou, Brian E Henderson, Alex P Reiner, Joel N Hirschhorn, Ruth J F Loos, Kari E North, Christopher A Haiman.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one new locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, P = 3.4 × 10(-11)) and another at 7p15 when we included data from the GIANT consortium (MIR148A-NFE2L3, rs10261878, P = 1.2 × 10(-10)). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African-ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, P = 6.9 × 10(-8)). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants showed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial P = 9.7 × 10(-7)), five of which reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations, as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations.
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Analysis of oxysterols and cholesterol in prefrontal cortex of suicides.
Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2013
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Brain oxysterol levels, which are enzymatic oxidation products of cholesterol (Chl), have been proposed to reflect the dynamic process of physiological synapse maintenance and repair of nerve terminals within the central nervous system (CNS), due to the turnover of membrane Chl. Modifications of oxysterols have important implications in neurological conditions, especially in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders in which alterations of synaptic plasticity or cell signalling are implicated, such as depression. Oxysterols can diffuse across the blood-brain barrier and have been hypothesized to provide a mechanism by which the brain can eliminate excess Chl to maintain a steady state. Relations of 24-hydroxycholesterol (24OH) and 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OH) specifically may provide a depiction of CNS Chl homeostasis. Thus, the objective of this study was to integrate oxysterol measures and gene expression measures in an effort to identify how they may relate to depression and suicide. Using post-mortem human prefrontal cortex tissue, quantification of metabolites by GC-MS and gene expression by qRT-PCR were performed with the aim to provide a characterization of enzymatic oxidative Chl homeostasis. Results show a significant increase in 24OH, which suggests a higher turnover of Chl to 24OH in the prefrontal cortex of suicide cases. An increase in 24OH may, in combination with liver-X receptor activation, explain the observed reduction of low central and peripheral Chl in suicide and would have implications for synapse maintenance and loss in the neuropathology of depression and suicide.
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Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci.
Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Fergus J Couch, Sara Lindstrom, Kyriaki Michailidou, Marjanka K Schmidt, Mark N Brook, Nick Orr, Suhn Kyong Rhie, Elio Riboli, Heather S Feigelson, Loic Le Marchand, Julie E Buring, Diana Eccles, Penelope Miron, Peter A Fasching, Hiltrud Brauch, Jenny Chang-Claude, Jane Carpenter, Andrew K Godwin, Heli Nevanlinna, Graham G Giles, Angela Cox, John L Hopper, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Ed Dicks, Will J Howat, Nils Schoof, Stig E Bojesen, Diether Lambrechts, Annegien Broeks, Irene L Andrulis, Pascal Guénel, Barbara Burwinkel, Elinor J Sawyer, Antoinette Hollestelle, Olivia Fletcher, Robert Winqvist, Hermann Brenner, Arto Mannermaa, Ute Hamann, Alfons Meindl, Annika Lindblom, Wei Zheng, Peter Devillee, Mark S Goldberg, Jan Lubiński, Vessela Kristensen, Anthony Swerdlow, Hoda Anton-Culver, Thilo Dörk, Kenneth Muir, Keitaro Matsuo, Anna H Wu, Paolo Radice, Soo Hwang Teo, Xiao-Ou Shu, William Blot, Daehee Kang, Mikael Hartman, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Chen-Yang Shen, Melissa C Southey, Daniel J Park, Fleur Hammet, Jennifer Stone, Laura J Van't Veer, Emiel J Rutgers, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Julian Peto, Michael G Schrauder, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Nichola Johnson, Helen Warren, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Federick Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Thérèse Truong, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Pierre Kerbrat, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Roger L Milne, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Peter Lichtner, Magdalena Lochmann, Christina Justenhoven, Yon-Dschun Ko, , Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Dario Greco, Tuomas Heikkinen, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Yasushi Yatabe, Natalia N Antonenkova, Sara Margolin, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Rosemary Balleine, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Patrick Neven, Anne-Sophie Dieudonné, Karin Leunen, Anja Rudolph, Stefan Nickels, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernard Peissel, Loris Bernard, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Kristen Stevens, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Catriona McLean, Gerhard A Coetzee, Ye Feng, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Natalia V Bogdanova, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Cheng Har Yip, Nur Aishah Mohd Taib, Ching-Yu Cheng, Martha Shrubsole, Jirong Long, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Saila Kauppila, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Anna Marie Mulligan, Robertus A E M Tollenaar, Caroline M Seynaeve, Mieke Kriege, Maartje J Hooning, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Carolien H M van Deurzen, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Hui Cai, Sabapathy P Balasubramanian, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, Lisa Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Mitul Shah, Hui Miao, Ching Wan Chan, Kee Seng Chia, Anna Jakubowska, Katarzyna Jaworska, Katarzyna Durda, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Alan Ashworth, Michael Jones, Daniel C Tessier, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Christine B Ambrosone, Elisa V Bandera, Esther M John, Gary K Chen, Jennifer J Hu, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Leslie Bernstein, Michael F Press, Regina G Ziegler, Robert M Millikan, Sandra L Deming-Halverson, Sarah Nyante, Sue A Ingles, Quinten Waisfisz, Helen Tsimiklis, Enes Makalic, Daniel Schmidt, Minh Bui, Lorna Gibson, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Rita K Schmutzler, Rebecca Hein, Norbert Dahmen, Lars Beckmann, Kirsimari Aaltonen, Kamila Czene, Astrid Irwanto, Jianjun Liu, Clare Turnbull, Nazneen Rahman, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, André G Uitterlinden, Fernando Rivadeneira, Curtis Olswold, Susan Slager, Robert Pilarski, Foluso Ademuyiwa, Irene Konstantopoulou, Nicholas G Martin, Grant W Montgomery, Dennis J Slamon, Claudia Rauh, Michael P Lux, Sebastian M Jud, Thomas Brüning, Joellen Weaver, Priyanka Sharma, Harsh Pathak, Will Tapper, Sue Gerty, Lorraine Durcan, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Rosario Tumino, Petra H Peeters, Rudolf Kaaks, Daniele Campa, Federico Canzian, Elisabete Weiderpass, Mattias Johansson, Kay-Tee Khaw, Ruth Travis, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Laurence N Kolonel, Constance Chen, Andy Beck, Susan E Hankinson, Christine D Berg, Robert N Hoover, Jolanta Lissowska, Jonine D Figueroa, Daniel I Chasman, Mia M Gaudet, W Ryan Diver, Walter C Willett, David J Hunter, Jacques Simard, Javier Benitez, Alison M Dunning, Mark E Sherman, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Stephen J Chanock, Per Hall, Paul D P Pharoah, Celine Vachon, Douglas F Easton, Christopher A Haiman, Peter Kraft.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.
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A genome-wide scan for breast cancer risk haplotypes among African American women.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) simultaneously investigating hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have become a powerful tool in the investigation of new disease susceptibility loci. Haplotypes are sometimes thought to be superior to SNPs and are promising in genetic association analyses. The application of genome-wide haplotype analysis, however, is hindered by the complexity of haplotypes themselves and sophistication in computation. We systematically analyzed the haplotype effects for breast cancer risk among 5,761 African American women (3,016 cases and 2,745 controls) using a sliding window approach on the genome-wide scale. Three regions on chromosomes 1, 4 and 18 exhibited moderate haplotype effects. Furthermore, among 21 breast cancer susceptibility loci previously established in European populations, 10p15 and 14q24 are likely to harbor novel haplotype effects. We also proposed a heuristic of determining the significance level and the effective number of independent tests by the permutation analysis on chromosome 22 data. It suggests that the effective number was approximately half of the total (7,794 out of 15,645), thus the half number could serve as a quick reference to evaluating genome-wide significance if a similar sliding window approach of haplotype analysis is adopted in similar populations using similar genotype density.
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Hierarchical modeling identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility variants in inflammation pathways among 10,140 cases and 11,012 controls.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Recent evidence suggests that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we used a two-stage approach to investigate associations between genetic variants in inflammation pathways and lung cancer risk based on genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. A total of 7,650 sequence variants from 720 genes relevant to inflammation pathways were identified using keyword and pathway searches from Gene Cards and Gene Ontology databases. In Stage 1, six GWAS datasets from the International Lung Cancer Consortium were pooled (4,441 cases and 5,094 controls of European ancestry), and a hierarchical modeling (HM) approach was used to incorporate prior information for each of the variants into the analysis. The prior matrix was constructed using (1) role of genes in the inflammation and immune pathways; (2) physical properties of the variants including the location of the variants, their conservation scores and amino acid coding; (3) LD with other functional variants and (4) measures of heterogeneity across the studies. HM affected the priority ranking of variants particularly among those having low prior weights, imprecise estimates and/or heterogeneity across studies. In Stage 2, we used an independent NCI lung cancer GWAS study (5,699 cases and 5,818 controls) for in silico replication. We identified one novel variant at the level corrected for multiple comparisons (rs2741354 in EPHX2 at 8q21.1 with p value = 7.4 × 10(-6)), and confirmed the associations between TERT (rs2736100) and the HLA region and lung cancer risk. HM allows for prior knowledge such as from bioinformatic sources to be incorporated into the analysis systematically, and it represents a complementary analytical approach to the conventional GWAS analysis.
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Discovering epistasis in large scale genetic association studies by exploiting graphics cards.
Front Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Despite the enormous investments made in collecting DNA samples and generating germline variation data across thousands of individuals in modern genome-wide association studies (GWAS), progress has been frustratingly slow in explaining much of the heritability in common disease. Todays paradigm of testing independent hypotheses on each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker is unlikely to adequately reflect the complex biological processes in disease risk. Alternatively, modeling risk as an ensemble of SNPs that act in concert in a pathway, and/or interact non-additively on log risk for example, may be a more sensible way to approach gene mapping in modern studies. Implementing such analyzes genome-wide can quickly become intractable due to the fact that even modest size SNP panels on modern genotype arrays (500k markers) pose a combinatorial nightmare, require tens of billions of models to be tested for evidence of interaction. In this article, we provide an in-depth analysis of programs that have been developed to explicitly overcome these enormous computational barriers through the use of processors on graphics cards known as Graphics Processing Units (GPU). We include tutorials on GPU technology, which will convey why they are growing in appeal with todays numerical scientists. One obvious advantage is the impressive density of microprocessor cores that are available on only a single GPU. Whereas high end servers feature up to 24 Intel or AMD CPU cores, the latest GPU offerings from nVidia feature over 2600 cores. Each compute node may be outfitted with up to 4 GPU devices. Success on GPUs varies across problems. However, epistasis screens fare well due to the high degree of parallelism exposed in these problems. Papers that we review routinely report GPU speedups of over two orders of magnitude (>100x) over standard CPU implementations.
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Incorporating biological information into association studies of sequencing data.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2011
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We summarize the methodological contributions from Group 3 of Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 (GAW17). The overarching goal of these methods was the evaluation and enhancement of state-of-the-art approaches in integration of biological knowledge into association studies of rare variants. We found that methods loosely fell into three major categories: (1) hypothesis testing of index scores based on aggregating rare variants at the gene level, (2) variable selection techniques that incorporate biological prior information, and (3) novel approaches that integrate external (i.e., not provided by GAW17) prior information, such as pathway and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) annotations. Commonalities among the findings from these contributions are that gene-based analysis of rare variants is advantageous to single-SNP analysis and that the minor allele frequency threshold to identify rare variants may influence power and thus needs to be carefully considered. A consistent increase in power was also identified by considering only nonsynonymous SNPs in the analyses. Overall, we found that no single method had an appreciable advantage over the other methods. However, methods that carried out sensitivity analyses by comparing biologically informative to noninformative prior probabilities demonstrated that integrating biological knowledge into statistical analyses always, at the least, enabled subtle improvements in the performance of any statistical method applied to these simulated data. Although these statistical improvements reflect the simulation model assumed for GAW17, our hope is that the simulation models provide a reasonable representation of the underlying biology and that these methods can thus be of utility in real data.
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Enhancing the discovery of rare disease variants through hierarchical modeling.
BMC Proc
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2011
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Advances in next-generation sequencing technology are enabling researchers to capture a comprehensive picture of genomic variation across large numbers of individuals with unprecedented levels of efficiency. The main analytic challenge in disease mapping is how to mine the data for rare causal variants among a sea of neutral variation. To achieve this goal, investigators have proposed a number of methods that exploit biological knowledge. In this paper, I propose applying a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection algorithm in this context. My multivariate method is inspired by the combined multivariate and collapsing method. In this proposed method, however, I allow an arbitrary number of different sources of biological knowledge to inform the model as prior distributions in a two-level hierarchical model. This allows rare variants with similar prior distributions to share evidence of association. Using the 1000 Genomes Project single-nucleotide polymorphism data provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 17, I show that through biologically informative prior distributions, some power can be gained over noninformative prior distributions.
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Stabilization of unstable pelvic fractures with a novel internal-external fixator.
Chin. Med. J.
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2011
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An internal-external fixator for stabilization in three cases with unstable pelvic fractures were reported. Compared with external fixation, the internal-external fixator, which is placed in the subcutaneous layer, decreased the risk of pin-track infection, pin site pain, and bowel obstruction; meanwhile, it had the advantage of external fixation: it was easy to apply, controlled damage, and resulted in minimal injury.
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Fine-mapping of breast cancer susceptibility loci characterizes genetic risk in African Americans.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2011
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 19 common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Testing of the index signals found through GWAS and fine-mapping of each locus in diverse populations will be necessary for characterizing the role of these risk regions in contributing to inherited susceptibility. In this large study of breast cancer in African-American women (3016 cases and 2745 controls), we tested the 19 known risk variants identified by GWAS and replicated associations (P < 0.05) with only 4 variants. Through fine-mapping, we identified markers in four regions that better capture the association with breast cancer risk in African Americans as defined by the index signal (2q35, 5q11, 10q26 and 19p13). We also identified statistically significant associations with markers in four separate regions (8q24, 10q22, 11q13 and 16q12) that are independent of the index signals and may represent putative novel risk variants. In aggregate, the more informative markers found in the study enhance the association of these risk regions with breast cancer in African Americans [per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, P = 2.8 × 10(-24) versus OR = 1.04, P = 6.1 × 10(-5)]. In this detailed analysis of the known breast cancer risk loci, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk that better characterize their association with breast cancer in women of African ancestry.
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High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: longer- and brighter-burning, perchlorate-free, red-light illuminants for military and civilian applications.
Chemistry
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2011
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The full-up prototype testing of perchlorate-free, hand-held, signal illuminants for the US Armys M126A1 red star parachute hand-held signal is described. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants yielded excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli while offering superior pyrotechnic performance. Militarily, the illuminants provided further evidence that development of smaller hand-held signal items in an environmentally conscious way is a realistic and obtainable goal. The results are also important from the perspective of civilian fireworks, as the development of brighter, longer-burning, and environmentally compatible red-light-emitting pyrotechnics is now possible.
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Copy number alterations in prostate tumors and disease aggressiveness.
Genes Chromosomes Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Detecting genomic alterations that result in more aggressive prostate cancer may improve clinical treatment and our understanding of the biology underlying this common but complex disease. To this end, we undertook a genome-wide copy number alterations (CNAs) study of clinicopathological characteristics of 62 prostate tumors using the Illumina 1M single nucleotide polymorphism array. The highest overall frequencies of CNAs were on chromosomes 8q (gains), 8p (loss and copy-neutral), and 6q (copy-loss). Combined loss and copy-neutral events were associated with increasing disease grade (P = 0.03), stage (P = 0.01), and diagnostic prostate specific antigen (PSA) (P = 0.01). Further evaluation of CNAs using gene ontology identified pathways involved with disease aggressiveness. The "regulation of apoptosis" pathway was associated with stage of disease (P = 0.004), while the "reproductive cellular process" pathway was associated with diagnostic PSA (P = 0.00038). Specific genes within these pathways exhibited strong associations with clinical characteristics; for example, in the apoptosis pathway BNIP3L was associated with increasing prostate tumor stage (P = 0.007). These findings confirm known regions of CNAs in prostate cancer and localize additional regions and possible genes (e.g., BNIP3L, WWOX, and GATM) that may help to clarify the genetic basis of prostate cancer aggressiveness.
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Aberrant TGF?/SMAD4 signaling contributes to epigenetic silencing of a putative tumor suppressor, RunX1T1 in ovarian cancer.
Epigenetics
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2011
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Aberrant TGF? signaling pathway may alter the expression of down-stream targets and promotes ovarian carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism of this impairment is not fully understood. Our previous study has identified RunX1T1 as a putative SMAD4 target in an immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cell line, IOSE. In this study, we report that transcription of RunX1T1 was confirmed to be positively regulated by SMAD4 in IOSE cells and epigenetically silenced in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines by promoter hypermethylation and histone methylation at H3 lysine 9. SMAD4 depletion increased repressive histone modifications of RunX1T1 promoter without affecting promoter methylation in IOSE cells. Epigenetic treatment can restore RunX1T1 expression by reversing its epigenetic status in MCP3 ovarian cancer cells. When transiently treated with a demethylating agent, the expression of RunX1T1 was partially restored in MCP3 cells, but gradual re-silencing through promoter re-methylation was observed after the treatment. Interestingly, SMAD4 knockdown accelerated this re-silencing process, suggesting that normal TGF-beta signaling is essential for the maintenance of RunX1T1 expression. In vivo analysis confirmed that hypermethylation of RunX1T1 was detected in 35.7% (34/95) of ovarian tumors with high clinical stages (P=0.035) and in 83% (5/6) of primary ovarian cancer-initiating cells. Additionally, concurrent methylation of RunX1T1 and another SMAD4 target, FBXO32 which was previously found to be hypermethylated in ovarian cancer was observed in this same sample cohort (P< 0.05). Restoration of RunX1T1 inhibited cancer cell growth. Taken together, dysregulated TGF?/SMAD4 signaling may lead to epigenetic silencing of a putative tumor suppressor, RunX1T1, during ovarian carcinogenesis.
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Distinct DNA methylation epigenotypes in bladder cancer from different Chinese sub-populations and its implication in cancer detection using voided urine.
BMC Med Genomics
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world and the incidence is particularly high in southwestern Taiwan. Previous studies have identified several tumor-related genes that are hypermethylated in bladder cancer; however the DNA methylation profile of bladder cancer in Taiwan is not fully understood.
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A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.
Christopher A Haiman, Gary K Chen, Celine M Vachon, Federico Canzian, Alison Dunning, Robert C Millikan, Xianshu Wang, Foluso Ademuyiwa, Shahana Ahmed, Christine B Ambrosone, Laura Baglietto, Rosemary Balleine, Elisa V Bandera, Matthias W Beckmann, Christine D Berg, Leslie Bernstein, Carl Blomqvist, William J Blot, Hiltrud Brauch, Julie E Buring, Lisa A Carey, Jane E Carpenter, Jenny Chang-Claude, Stephen J Chanock, Daniel I Chasman, Christine L Clarke, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Sandra L Deming, Robert B Diasio, Athanasios M Dimopoulos, W Ryan Driver, Thomas Dünnebier, Lorraine Durcan, Diana Eccles, Christopher K Edlund, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, Heather S Feigelson, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Florentia Fostira, Asta Försti, George Fountzilas, Susan M Gerty, , Graham G Giles, Andrew K Godwin, Paul Goodfellow, Nikki Graham, Dario Greco, Ute Hamann, Susan E Hankinson, Arndt Hartmann, Rebecca Hein, Judith Heinz, Andrea Holbrook, Robert N Hoover, Jennifer J Hu, David J Hunter, Sue A Ingles, Astrid Irwanto, Jennifer Ivanovich, Esther M John, Nicola Johnson, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Rudolf Kaaks, Yon-Dschun Ko, Laurence N Kolonel, Irene Konstantopoulou, Veli-Matti Kosma, Swati Kulkarni, Diether Lambrechts, Adam M Lee, Loic Le Marchand, Timothy Lesnick, Jianjun Liu, Sara Lindstrom, Arto Mannermaa, Sara Margolin, Nicholas G Martin, Penelope Miron, Grant W Montgomery, Heli Nevanlinna, Stephan Nickels, Sarah Nyante, Curtis Olswold, Julie Palmer, Harsh Pathak, Dimitrios Pectasides, Charles M Perou, Julian Peto, Paul D P Pharoah, Loreall C Pooler, Michael F Press, Katri Pylkäs, Timothy R Rebbeck, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Lynn Rosenberg, Eric Ross, Thomas Rüdiger, Isabel dos Santos Silva, Elinor Sawyer, Marjanka K Schmidt, Rüdiger Schulz-Wendtland, Fredrick Schumacher, Gianluca Severi, Xin Sheng, Lisa B Signorello, Hans-Peter Sinn, Kristen N Stevens, Melissa C Southey, William J Tapper, Ian Tomlinson, Frans B L Hogervorst, Els Wauters, Joellen Weaver, Hans Wildiers, Robert Winqvist, David Van Den Berg, Peggy Wan, Lucy Y Xia, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Wei Zheng, Regina G Ziegler, Afshan Siddiq, Susan L Slager, Daniel O Stram, Douglas Easton, Peter Kraft, Brian E Henderson, Fergus J Couch.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2011
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Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.
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Identification, replication, and fine-mapping of Loci associated with adult height in individuals of african ancestry.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2011
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Adult height is a classic polygenic trait of high heritability (h(2) approximately 0.8). More than 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified mostly in populations of European descent, are associated with height. These variants convey modest effects and explain approximately10% of the variance in height. Discovery efforts in other populations, while limited, have revealed loci for height not previously implicated in individuals of European ancestry. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results for adult height in 20,427 individuals of African ancestry with replication in up to 16,436 African Americans. We found two novel height loci (Xp22-rs12393627, P?=?3.4×10(-12) and 2p14-rs4315565, P?=?1.2×10(-8)). As a group, height associations discovered in European-ancestry samples replicate in individuals of African ancestry (P?=?1.7×10(-4) for overall replication). Fine-mapping of the European height loci in African-ancestry individuals showed an enrichment of SNPs that are associated with expression of nearby genes when compared to the index European height SNPs (P<0.01). Our results highlight the utility of genetic studies in non-European populations to understand the etiology of complex human diseases and traits.
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Characterizing genetic risk at known prostate cancer susceptibility loci in African Americans.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2011
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GWAS of prostate cancer have been remarkably successful in revealing common genetic variants and novel biological pathways that are linked with its etiology. A more complete understanding of inherited susceptibility to prostate cancer in the general population will come from continuing such discovery efforts and from testing known risk alleles in diverse racial and ethnic groups. In this large study of prostate cancer in African American men (3,425 prostate cancer cases and 3,290 controls), we tested 49 risk variants located in 28 genomic regions identified through GWAS in men of European and Asian descent, and we replicated associations (at p?0.05) with roughly half of these markers. Through fine-mapping, we identified nearby markers in many regions that better define associations in African Americans. At 8q24, we found 9 variants (p?6×10(-4)) that best capture risk of prostate cancer in African Americans, many of which are more common in men of African than European descent. The markers found to be associated with risk at each locus improved risk modeling in African Americans (per allele OR?=?1.17) over the alleles reported in the original GWAS (OR?=?1.08). In summary, in this detailed analysis of the prostate cancer risk loci reported from GWAS, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk in some regions that better define the association with prostate cancer in African Americans. Our findings with variants at 8q24 also reinforce the importance of this region as a major risk locus for prostate cancer in men of African ancestry.
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Enhanced statistical tests for GWAS in admixed populations: assessment using African Americans from CARe and a Breast Cancer Consortium.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have primarily examined populations of European ancestry, more recent studies often involve additional populations, including admixed populations such as African Americans and Latinos. In admixed populations, linkage disequilibrium (LD) exists both at a fine scale in ancestral populations and at a coarse scale (admixture-LD) due to chromosomal segments of distinct ancestry. Disease association statistics in admixed populations have previously considered SNP association (LD mapping) or admixture association (mapping by admixture-LD), but not both. Here, we introduce a new statistical framework for combining SNP and admixture association in case-control studies, as well as methods for local ancestry-aware imputation. We illustrate the gain in statistical power achieved by these methods by analyzing data of 6,209 unrelated African Americans from the CARe project genotyped on the Affymetrix 6.0 chip, in conjunction with both simulated and real phenotypes, as well as by analyzing the FGFR2 locus using breast cancer GWAS data from 5,761 African-American women. We show that, at typed SNPs, our method yields an 8% increase in statistical power for finding disease risk loci compared to the power achieved by standard methods in case-control studies. At imputed SNPs, we observe an 11% increase in statistical power for mapping disease loci when our local ancestry-aware imputation framework and the new scoring statistic are jointly employed. Finally, we show that our method increases statistical power in regions harboring the causal SNP in the case when the causal SNP is untyped and cannot be imputed. Our methods and our publicly available software are broadly applicable to GWAS in admixed populations.
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Genetic variation in Native Americans, inferred from Latino SNP and resequencing data.
Mol. Biol. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2011
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Analyses of genetic polymorphism data have the potential to be highly informative about the demographic history of Native American populations, but due to a combination of historical and political factors, there are essentially no autosomal sequence polymorphism data from any Native American group. However, there are many resequencing studies involving Latinos, whose genomes contain segments inherited from their Native American ancestors. In this study, we introduce a new method for estimating local ancestry across the genomes of admixed individuals and show how this method, along with dense genotyping and targeted resequencing, can be used to assay genetic variation in ancestral Native American groups. We analyze roughly 6 Mb of resequencing data from 22 Mexican Americans to provide the first large-scale view of sequence level variation in Native Americans. We observe low levels of diversity and high levels of linkage disequilibrium in the Native American-derived sequences, consistent with a recent severe population bottleneck associated with the initial peopling of the Americas. Using two different computational approaches, one novel, we estimate that this bottleneck occurred roughly 12.5 Kya; when uncertainty in the estimation process is taken into account, our results are consistent with archeological estimates for the colonization of the Americas.
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Genome-wide association study of prostate cancer in men of African ancestry identifies a susceptibility locus at 17q21.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
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In search of common risk alleles for prostate cancer that could contribute to high rates of the disease in men of African ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study, with 1,047,986 SNP markers examined in 3,425 African-Americans with prostate cancer (cases) and 3,290 African-American male controls. We followed up the most significant 17 new associations from stage 1 in 1,844 cases and 3,269 controls of African ancestry. We identified a new risk variant on chromosome 17q21 (rs7210100, odds ratio per allele = 1.51, P = 3.4 × 10(-13)). The frequency of the risk allele is ?5% in men of African descent, whereas it is rare in other populations (<1%). Further studies are needed to investigate the biological contribution of this allele to prostate cancer risk. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting genome-wide association studies in diverse populations.
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High-resolution capillary gas chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry for quantification of three major polyamines in postmortem brain cortex.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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There is considerable evidence supporting a role of the polyamine system in the etiology and pathology of mental disorders. Changes in the expression and activity of polyamine anabolic/catabolic enzymes, as well as in the levels of individual polyamines, have been found in many psychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety, and suicidal behavior. Recent microarray studies have found that spermidine/spermine-N¹-acetyltransferase (SAT1, SSAT), the key enzyme in charge of the polyamine catabolic pathway, is downregulated in brain tissue of individuals who were depressed and died by suicide. To provide further insight into the downstream effects of altered SAT1 expression, we developed a quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for measurement of polyamine concentrations in postmortem human brain tissues. This protocol employs a conventional electron ionization method with total ion and selected ion monitoring. This method can accurately measure the levels of the polyamines putrescine, spermidine, and spermine from very small quantities (1-50 mg) of postmortem brain tissues, with quantitation limits down to 10 ng/g of wet tissue for putrescine and 100 ng/g for spermidine and spermine.
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Polyamines are implicated in the emergence of the embryo from obligate diapause.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Embryonic diapause is a poorly understood phenomenon of reversible arrest of embryo development prior to implantation. In many carnivores, such as the mink (Neovison vison), obligate diapause characterizes each gestation. Embryo reactivation is controlled by the uterus by mechanisms that remain elusive. Because polyamines are essential regulators of cell proliferation and growth, it was hypothesized that they trigger embryo reactivation. To test this, mated mink females were treated with ?-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, or saline as a control during the first 5 d of reactivation. This treatment induced polyamine deprivation with the consequence of rearrest in embryo cell proliferation. A mink trophoblast cell line in vitro subjected to ?-difluoromethylornithine treatment likewise displayed an arrest in cell proliferation, morphological changes, and intracellular translocation of ornithine decarboxylase 1 protein. The arrest in embryo development deferred implantation for a period consistent with the length of treatment. Successful implantation and parturition ensued. We conclude that polyamine deprivation brought about a reversible rearrest of embryo development, which returned the mink embryo to diapause and induced a second delay in embryo implantation. The results are the first demonstration of a factor essential to reactivation of embryos in obligate diapause.
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The landscape of recombination in African Americans.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Recombination, together with mutation, gives rise to genetic variation in populations. Here we leverage the recent mixture of people of African and European ancestry in the Americas to build a genetic map measuring the probability of crossing over at each position in the genome, based on about 2.1 million crossovers in 30,000 unrelated African Americans. At intervals of more than three megabases it is nearly identical to a map built in Europeans. At finer scales it differs significantly, and we identify about 2,500 recombination hotspots that are active in people of West African ancestry but nearly inactive in Europeans. The probability of a crossover at these hotspots is almost fully controlled by the alleles an individual carries at PRDM9 (P?value
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Using biological knowledge to discover higher order interactions in genetic association studies.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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The recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed that many of the replicated findings have explained only a small fraction of the heritability of common diseases. One hypothesis that investigators have suggested is that higher order interactions between SNPs or SNPs and environmental risk factors may account for some of this missing heritability. Searching for these interactions poses great statistical and computational challenges. In this article, we propose a novel method that addresses these challenges by incorporating external biological knowledge into a fully Bayesian analysis. The method is designed to be scalable for high-dimensional search spaces (where it supports interactions of any order) because priors that use such knowledge focus the search in regions that are more biologically plausible and avoid having to enumerate all possible interactions. We provide several examples based on simulated data demonstrating how external information can enhance power, specificity, and effect estimates in comparison to conventional approaches based on maximum likelihood estimates. We also apply the method to data from a GWAS for breast cancer, revealing a set of interactions enriched for the Gene Ontology terms growth, metabolic process, and biological regulation.
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Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.
World J Hepatol
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2010
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We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss.
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A novel liquid-liquid extraction and stable isotope dilution NCI-GC-MS method for quantitation of agmatine in postmortem brain cortex.
J Mass Spectrom
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2010
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The group of biologically important amines includes putrescine, spermidine and spermine, as well as agmatine, which is a guanidino-amine. There is considerable evidence supporting a role of these amines in the etiology and pathology of mental disorders. We have previously developed a quantitative GC-MS method for simultaneous measurement of three major polyamines to support our studies linking polyamines to mental disorders. However, a unique GC-MS method is required for agmatine. To efficiently extract agmatine from postmortem brain tissues, we developed an isopropanol based liquid-liquid extraction protocol using potassium carbonate as a salting-out agent which showed a much greater recovery than n-butanol used in earlier methods. The GC-MS analysis employed hexafluoroacetylacetone as derivatization reagent and was carried out using negative chemical ionization with total ion and selected ion monitoring. (15)N(4)-agmatine was synthesized from (15)N(4)-L-arginine and used as internal standard in a conventional stable isotope dilution assay. This method accurately measures the level of agmatine from very small quantities (10-20 mg) of postmortem brain tissue, with a quantitation limit down to 1 ng/g of wet tissue. The limit of detection is 0.01 ng/g of wet tissue.
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Evidence of altered polyamine concentrations in cerebral cortex of suicide completers.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2010
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Recent studies have implicated alterations in the expression of polyamine-related genes in the brains of suicide completers including widespread downregulation of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, the key enzyme in polyamine catabolism, suggesting compensatory mechanisms attempting to increase brain levels of polyamines. Given the complexity of the polyamine system, quantification of the levels of the polyamines is an essential step in understanding the downstream effects of dysregulated gene expression. We developed a method using high-resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) for quantitation of polyamines from post-mortem brain tissue, which allowed us to accurately measure spermidine and putrescine concentrations in post-mortem brain tissues. Using this method, we analyzed putrescine and spermidine levels in a total of 126 samples from Brodmann areas 4, 8/9, and 11, from 42 subjects, comprising 16 suicide completers with major depression, 13 non-depressed suicide completers, and 13 control subjects. Both putrescine and spermidine levels fell within the expected nanomolar ranges and were significantly elevated in the brain of suicide completers with a history of major depression as compared with controls. These results were not accounted by possible confounders. This is the first GC-MS study to analyze the expression of putrescine and spermidine from post-mortem brain tissue and confirms the hypothesis raised by previous studies indicating alterations in putrescine and spermidine levels in suicide/major depression.
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The potential for enhancing the power of genetic association studies in African Americans through the reuse of existing genotype data.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2010
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We consider the feasibility of reusing existing control data obtained in genetic association studies in order to reduce costs for new studies. We discuss controlling for the population differences between cases and controls that are implicit in studies utilizing external control data. We give theoretical calculations of the statistical power of a test due to Bourgain et al (Am J Human Genet 2003), applied to the problem of dealing with case-control differences in genetic ancestry related to population isolation or population admixture. Theoretical results show that there may exist bounds for the non-centrality parameter for a test of association that places limits on study power even if sample sizes can grow arbitrarily large. We apply this method to data from a multi-center, geographically-diverse, genome-wide association study of breast cancer in African-American women. Our analysis of these data shows that admixture proportions differ by center with the average fraction of European admixture ranging from approximately 20% for participants from study sites in the Eastern United States to 25% for participants from West Coast sites. However, these differences in average admixture fraction between sites are largely counterbalanced by considerable diversity in individual admixture proportion within each study site. Our results suggest that statistical correction for admixture differences is feasible for future studies of African-Americans, utilizing the existing controls from the African-American Breast Cancer study, even if case ascertainment for the future studies is not balanced over the same centers or regions that supplied the controls for the current study.
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Capsule endoscopy in patients with Crohns disease: diagnostic yield and safety.
Gastrointest. Endosc.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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Capsule endoscopy (CE) is increasingly used in patients with suspected or known Crohns disease (CD).
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A quantitative GC-MS method for three major polyamines in postmortem brain cortex.
J Mass Spectrom
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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A quantitative method for putrescine (PUT), spermidine (SPD) and spermine (SPM) in homogenized postmortem human brain tissue is described that employs a novel, simple and rapid extractive derivatization with ethylchloroformate and trifluoroacetylation. These amines are metabolites of ornithine and are metabolically interconvertible in mammals. The method was developed to support an ongoing epidemiological study correlating these amines with the frequency of suicide. The isolation methodology is robust and requires less work and time than many previous methods. Analysis is by conventional electron ionization GC-MS with selected ion monitoring using a stable isotope-labeled analog for PUT and a chemical analog for SPD and SPM as internal standards. The time required for chromatographic analysis, about 20 min, is determined by the wide range of the relative volatilities of the derivatized polyamines. The method allows the quantitation of PUT down to 10 ng/g and SPD and SPM down to 100 and 1000 ng/g, respectively of wet tissue.
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Fast and flexible simulation of DNA sequence data.
Genome Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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Simulation of genomic sequences under the coalescent with recombination has conventionally been impractical for regions beyond tens of megabases. This work presents an algorithm, implemented as the program MaCS (Markovian Coalescent Simulator), that can efficiently simulate haplotypes under any arbitrary model of population history. We present several metrics comparing the performance of MaCS with other available simulation programs. Practical usage of MaCS is demonstrated through a comparison of measures of linkage disequilibrium between generated program output and real genotype data from populations considered to be structured.
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Concurrent findings of achalasia and duodenal duplication in a Down syndrome patient.
J. Formos. Med. Assoc.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2009
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The association between Down syndrome and gastrointestinal anomalies such as duodenal and esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistulas, and Hirschsprungs disease is well documented. More recently, an association between Down syndrome and achalasia was reported. In this report, we describe a 48-year-old woman with a history of Down syndrome who presented with dysphagia. Work-up of the dysphagia showed not only achalasia but also a duodenal duplication. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of Down syndrome associated with duodenal duplication. Whether this finding is simply a coincidence or whether duodenal duplication is associated with Down syndrome will need to be determined with future studies.
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Genotype imputation via matrix completion.
Genome Res.
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Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency.
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Population genetic structure and origins of Native Hawaiians in the multiethnic cohort study.
PLoS ONE
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The population genetic structure of Native Hawaiians has yet to be comprehensively studied, and the ancestral origins of Polynesians remain in question. In this study, we utilized high-resolution genome-wide SNP data and mitochondrial genomes of 148 and 160 Native Hawaiians, respectively, to characterize their population structure of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, ancestral origins, and population expansion. Native Hawaiians, who self-reported full Native Hawaiian heritage, demonstrated 78% Native Hawaiian, 11.5% European, and 7.8% Asian ancestry with 99% belonging to the B4 mitochondrial haplogroup. The estimated proportions of Native Hawaiian ancestry for those who reported mixed ancestry (i.e. 75% and 50% Native Hawaiian heritage) were found to be consistent with their self-reported heritage. A significant proportion of Melanesian ancestry (mean?=?32%) was estimated in 100% self-reported Native Hawaiians in an ADMIXTURE analysis of Asian, Melanesian, and Native Hawaiian populations of K?=?2, where K denotes the number of ancestral populations. This notable proportion of Melanesian admixture supports the "Slow-Boat" model of migration of ancestral Polynesian populations from East Asia to the Pacific Islands. In addition, approximately 1,300 years ago a single, strong expansion of the Native Hawaiian population was estimated. By providing important insight into the underlying population structure of Native Hawaiians, this study lays the foundation for future genetic association studies of this U.S. minority population.
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Reproducibility, performance, and clinical utility of a genetic risk prediction model for prostate cancer in Japanese.
PLoS ONE
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Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used as a diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer (PC). However, due to its low predictive performance, many patients without PC suffer from the harms of unnecessary prostate needle biopsies. The present study aims to evaluate the reproducibility and performance of a genetic risk prediction model in Japanese and estimate its utility as a diagnostic biomarker in a clinical scenario. We created a logistic regression model incorporating 16 SNPs that were significantly associated with PC in a genome-wide association study of Japanese population using 689 cases and 749 male controls. The model was validated by two independent sets of Japanese samples comprising 3,294 cases and 6,281 male controls. The areas under curve (AUC) of the model were 0.679, 0.655, and 0.661 for the samples used to create the model and those used for validation. The AUCs were not significantly altered in samples with PSA 1-10 ng/ml. 24.2% and 9.7% of the patients had odds ratio <0.5 (low risk) or >2 (high risk) in the model. Assuming the overall positive rate of prostate needle biopsies to be 20%, the positive biopsy rates were 10.7% and 42.4% for the low and high genetic risk groups respectively. Our genetic risk prediction model for PC was highly reproducible, and its predictive performance was not influenced by PSA. The model could have a potential to affect clinical decision when it is applied to patients with gray-zone PSA, which should be confirmed in future clinical studies.
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A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11.
Afshan Siddiq, Fergus J Couch, Gary K Chen, Sara Lindstrom, Diana Eccles, Robert C Millikan, Kyriaki Michailidou, Daniel O Stram, Lars Beckmann, Suhn Kyong Rhie, Christine B Ambrosone, Kristiina Aittomäki, Pilar Amiano, Carmel Apicella, , Laura Baglietto, Elisa V Bandera, Matthias W Beckmann, Christine D Berg, Leslie Bernstein, Carl Blomqvist, Hiltrud Brauch, Louise Brinton, Quang M Bui, Julie E Buring, Saundra S Buys, Daniele Campa, Jane E Carpenter, Daniel I Chasman, Jenny Chang-Claude, Constance Chen, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Kamila Czene, Sandra L Deming, Robert B Diasio, W Ryan Diver, Alison M Dunning, Lorraine Durcan, Arif B Ekici, Peter A Fasching, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Laura Fejerman, Jonine D Figueroa, Olivia Fletcher, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Mia M Gaudet, Susan M Gerty, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Graham G Giles, Carla H van Gils, Andrew K Godwin, Nikki Graham, Dario Greco, Per Hall, Susan E Hankinson, Arndt Hartmann, Rebecca Hein, Judith Heinz, Robert N Hoover, John L Hopper, Jennifer J Hu, Scott Huntsman, Sue A Ingles, Astrid Irwanto, Claudine Isaacs, Kevin B Jacobs, Esther M John, Christina Justenhoven, Rudolf Kaaks, Laurence N Kolonel, Gerhard A Coetzee, Mark Lathrop, Loic Le Marchand, Adam M Lee, I-Min Lee, Timothy Lesnick, Peter Lichtner, Jianjun Liu, Eiliv Lund, Enes Makalic, Nicholas G Martin, Catriona A McLean, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, Alfons Meindl, Penelope Miron, Kristine R Monroe, Grant W Montgomery, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Stefan Nickels, Sarah J Nyante, Curtis Olswold, Kim Overvad, Domenico Palli, Daniel J Park, Julie R Palmer, Harsh Pathak, Julian Peto, Paul Pharoah, Nazneen Rahman, Fernando Rivadeneira, Daniel F Schmidt, Rita K Schmutzler, Susan Slager, Melissa C Southey, Kristen N Stevens, Hans-Peter Sinn, Michael F Press, Eric Ross, Elio Riboli, Paul M Ridker, Fredrick R Schumacher, Gianluca Severi, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Jennifer Stone, Malin Sund, William J Tapper, Michael J Thun, Ruth C Travis, Clare Turnbull, André G Uitterlinden, Quinten Waisfisz, Xianshu Wang, Zhaoming Wang, Joellen Weaver, Rüdiger Schulz-Wendtland, Lynne R Wilkens, David Van Den Berg, Wei Zheng, Regina G Ziegler, Elad Ziv, Heli Nevanlinna, Douglas F Easton, David J Hunter, Brian E Henderson, Stephen J Chanock, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Peter Kraft, Christopher A Haiman, Celine M Vachon.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P ? 1 × 10(-5) in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR = 1.16; P = 1.1 × 10(-8)) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR = 1.08, P = 1.3 × 10(-6)) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR = 1.01, P = 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR = 1.12; P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), and with both ER-positive (OR = 1.09; P = 1.5 × 10(-5)) and ER-negative (OR = 1.16, P = 2.5 × 10(-7)) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.
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Mendel-GPU: haplotyping and genotype imputation on graphics processing units.
Bioinformatics
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In modern sequencing studies, one can improve the confidence of genotype calls by phasing haplotypes using information from an external reference panel of fully typed unrelated individuals. However, the computational demands are so high that they prohibit researchers with limited computational resources from haplotyping large-scale sequence data.
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A genome-wide association study of breast cancer in women of African ancestry.
Hum. Genet.
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in diverse populations are needed to reveal variants that are more common and/or limited to defined populations. We conducted a GWAS of breast cancer in women of African ancestry, with genotyping of >1,000,000 SNPs in 3,153 African American cases and 2,831 controls, and replication testing of the top 66 associations in an additional 3,607 breast cancer cases and 11,330 controls of African ancestry. Two of the 66 SNPs replicated (p < 0.05) in stage 2, which reached statistical significance levels of 10(-6) and 10(-5) in the stage 1 and 2 combined analysis (rs4322600 at chromosome 14q31: OR = 1.18, p = 4.3 × 10(-6); rs10510333 at chromosome 3p26: OR = 1.15, p = 1.5 × 10(-5)). These suggestive risk loci have not been identified in previous GWAS in other populations and will need to be examined in additional samples. Identification of novel risk variants for breast cancer in women of African ancestry will demand testing of a substantially larger set of markers from stage 1 in a larger replication sample.
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Evaluating genetic risk for prostate cancer among Japanese and Latinos.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
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There have been few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of prostate cancer among diverse populations. To search for novel prostate cancer risk variants, we conducted GWAS of prostate cancer in Japanese and Latinos. In addition, we tested prostate cancer risk variants and developed genetic risk models of prostate cancer for Japanese and Latinos.
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Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl.
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In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities.
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Common variants at 11q12, 10q26 and 3p11.2 are associated with prostate cancer susceptibility in Japanese.
Nat. Genet.
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We have previously reported multiple loci associated with prostate cancer susceptibility in a Japanese population using a genome-wide association study (GWAS). To identify additional prostate cancer susceptibility loci, we genotyped nine SNPs that were nominally associated with prostate cancer (P < 1 × 10(-4)) in our previous GWAS in three independent studies of prostate cancer in Japanese men (2,557 individuals with prostate cancer (cases) and 3,003 controls). In a meta-analysis of our previous GWAS and the replication studies, which included a total of 7,141 prostate cancer cases and 11,804 controls from a single ancestry group, three new loci reached genome-wide significance on chromosomes 11q12 (rs1938781; P = 1.10 × 10(-10); FAM111A-FAM111B), 10q26 (rs2252004; P = 1.98 × 10(-8)) and 3p11.2 (rs2055109; P = 3.94 × 10(-8)). We also found suggestive evidence of association at a previously reported prostate cancer susceptibility locus at 2p11 (rs2028898; P = 1.08 × 10(-7)). The identification of three new susceptibility loci should provide additional insight into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and emphasizes the importance of conducting GWAS in diverse populations.
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Meta-analysis identifies common variants associated with body mass index in east Asians.
Nat. Genet.
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Multiple genetic loci associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI) have been identified through genome-wide association studies conducted predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We performed a meta-analysis of associations between BMI and approximately 2.4 million SNPs in 27,715 east Asians, which was followed by in silico and de novo replication studies in 37,691 and 17,642 additional east Asians, respectively. We identified ten BMI-associated loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), including seven previously identified loci (FTO, SEC16B, MC4R, GIPR-QPCTL, ADCY3-DNAJC27, BDNF and MAP2K5) and three novel loci in or near the CDKAL1, PCSK1 and GP2 genes. Three additional loci nearly reached the genome-wide significance threshold, including two previously identified loci in the GNPDA2 and TFAP2B genes and a newly identified signal near PAX6, all of which were associated with BMI with P < 5.0 × 10(-7). Findings from this study may shed light on new pathways involved in obesity and demonstrate the value of conducting genetic studies in non-European populations.
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A scalable and portable framework for massively parallel variable selection in genetic association studies.
Bioinformatics
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The deluge of data emerging from high-throughput sequencing technologies poses large analytical challenges when testing for association to disease. We introduce a scalable framework for variable selection, implemented in C++ and OpenCL, that fits regularized regression across multiple Graphics Processing Units. Open source code and documentation can be found at a Google Code repository under the URL http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/01/10/bioinformatics.bts015.abstract.
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Admixture mapping identifies a locus on 6q25 associated with breast cancer risk in US Latinas.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Among US Latinas and Mexican women, those with higher European ancestry have increased risk of breast cancer. We combined an admixture mapping and genome-wide association mapping approach to search for genomic regions that may explain this observation. Latina women with breast cancer (n= 1497) and Latina controls (n= 1272) were genotyped using Affymetrix and Illumina arrays. We inferred locus-specific genetic ancestry and compared the ancestry between cases and controls. We also performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association analyses in regions of interest. Correction for multiple-hypothesis testing was conducted using permutations (P(corrected)). We identified one region where genetic ancestry was significantly associated with breast cancer risk: 6q25 [odds ratio (OR) per Indigenous American chromosome 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65-0.85, P= 1.1 × 10(-5), P(corrected)= 0.02]. A second region on 11p15 showed a trend towards association (OR per Indigenous American chromosome 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.87, P= 4.3 × 10(-5), P(corrected)= 0.08). In both regions, breast cancer risk decreased with higher Indigenous American ancestry in concordance with observations made on global ancestry. The peak of the 6q25 signal includes the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and 5 region, a locus previously implicated in breast cancer. Genome-wide association analysis found that a multi-SNP model explained the admixture signal in both regions. Our results confirm that the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer risk in US Latinas is partly due to genetic differences between populations of European and Indigenous Americans origin. Fine-mapping within the 6q25 and possibly the 11p15 loci will lead to the discovery of the biologically functional variant/s behind this association.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.