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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat number in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a genotype-phenotype correlation study.
J. Alzheimers Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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Expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat in the C9ORF72 gene has been identified as the most common pathogenic mutation in families with autosomal dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Herein we investigated frequency and penetrance of the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat pathological expansion in a large cohort of familial and sporadic FTLD and related disorders (FTLD and related disorders, n = 388; Controls, n = 201). Moreover, we weighed the impact of C9ORF72 genotype on clinical phenotype taking into account the hexanucleotide repeat units number as a possible disease modifier. In our cohort, the C9ORF72 pathological expansion: (i) showed a prevalence of 7.5%; (ii) showed a full penetrance by the age of 80; (iii) was rarely found in sporadic patients; (iv) was solely associated with FTLD; (v) was mainly associated with bvFTD clinical subtype; and (vi) was associated with earlier age of onset in the youngest generation compared with the previous generation within a pedigree. Interestingly, intermediate C9ORF72 expansion had a risk effect in familial/sporadic FTLD. Eventually, the C9ORF72 repeat units number influenced the disease phenotype in terms of age of onset and associated clinical subtype. Genome-wide studies in well characterized clinical cohorts will be essential in order to decipher pathways of disease expression in C9ORF72-associated neurodegeneration.
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A mutation in the 5'-UTR of GRN gene associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration: phenotypic variability and possible pathogenetic mechanisms.
J. Alzheimers Dis.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2014
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Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a very heterogeneous disorder. It is genetically linked to three major genes: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (GRN), and C9ORF72. In particular, mutations in GRN account for 5-10% of all cases and give rise to a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) to primary progressive aphasia, including progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) and semantic dementia, and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). We studied a family affected by FTLD whose members showed three different phenotypes: bvFTD, PNFA, and CBS. We performed plasma progranulin measurement before any genetic analyses and, due to the low level detected, we sequenced GRN and found the new mutation EX0-5' splice site A > G in the 5'-UTR region, where no pathogenic mutations had been previously demonstrated. Genetic analyses of MAPT and C9ORF72 were normal. GRN mRNA expression showed about 50% reduction caused by this mutation, and similar results were found for progranulin level. Testing of nonsense mediated RNA decay gave negative results, suggesting a different mechanism of mRNA degradation. In summary, the EX0-5' splice site A > G mutation widens the GRN regions affected by null mutations, including the 5'-UTR, and confirms once more the large phenotypic variability linked to GRN mutations.
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Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study.
Raffaele Ferrari, Dena G Hernandez, Michael A Nalls, Jonathan D Rohrer, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, John B J Kwok, Carol Dobson-Stone, William S Brooks, Peter R Schofield, Glenda M Halliday, John R Hodges, Olivier Piguet, Lauren Bartley, Elizabeth Thompson, Eric Haan, Isabel Hernández, Agustin Ruíz, Mercè Boada, Barbara Borroni, Alessandro Padovani, Carlos Cruchaga, Nigel J Cairns, Luisa Benussi, Giuliano Binetti, Roberta Ghidoni, Gianluigi Forloni, Daniela Galimberti, Chiara Fenoglio, Maria Serpente, Elio Scarpini, Jordi Clarimón, Alberto Lleó, Rafael Blesa, Maria Landqvist Waldö, Karin Nilsson, Christer Nilsson, Ian R A Mackenzie, Ging-Yuek R Hsiung, David M A Mann, Jordan Grafman, Christopher M Morris, Johannes Attems, Timothy D Griffiths, Ian G McKeith, Alan J Thomas, P Pietrini, Edward D Huey, Eric M Wassermann, Atik Baborie, Evelyn Jaros, Michael C Tierney, Pau Pastor, Cristina Razquin, Sara Ortega-Cubero, Elena Alonso, Robert Perneczky, Janine Diehl-Schmid, Panagiotis Alexopoulos, Alexander Kurz, Innocenzo Rainero, Elisa Rubino, Lorenzo Pinessi, Ekaterina Rogaeva, Peter St George-Hyslop, Giacomina Rossi, Fabrizio Tagliavini, Giorgio Giaccone, James B Rowe, Johannes C M Schlachetzki, James Uphill, John Collinge, Simon Mead, Adrian Danek, Vivianna M Van Deerlin, Murray Grossman, John Q Trojanowski, Julie van der Zee, William Deschamps, Tim Van Langenhove, Marc Cruts, Christine Van Broeckhoven, Stefano F Cappa, Isabelle Le Ber, Didier Hannequin, Véronique Golfier, Martine Vercelletto, Alexis Brice, Benedetta Nacmias, Sandro Sorbi, Silvia Bagnoli, Irene Piaceri, Jørgen E Nielsen, Lena E Hjermind, Matthias Riemenschneider, Manuel Mayhaus, Bernd Ibach, Gilles Gasparoni, Sabrina Pichler, Wei Gu, Martin N Rossor, Nick C Fox, Jason D Warren, Maria Grazia Spillantini, Huw R Morris, Patrizia Rizzu, Peter Heutink, Julie S Snowden, Sara Rollinson, Anna Richardson, Alexander Gerhard, Amalia C Bruni, Raffaele Maletta, Francesca Frangipane, Chiara Cupidi, Livia Bernardi, Maria Anfossi, Maura Gallo, Maria Elena Conidi, Nicoletta Smirne, Rosa Rademakers, Matt Baker, Dennis W Dickson, Neill R Graff-Radford, Ronald C Petersen, David Knopman, Keith A Josephs, Bradley F Boeve, Joseph E Parisi, William W Seeley, Bruce L Miller, Anna M Karydas, Howard Rosen, John C van Swieten, Elise G P Dopper, Harro Seelaar, Yolande A L Pijnenburg, Philip Scheltens, Giancarlo Logroscino, Rosa Capozzo, Valeria Novelli, Annibale A Puca, Massimo Franceschi, Alfredo Postiglione, Graziella Milan, Paolo Sorrentino, Mark Kristiansen, Huei-Hsin Chiang, Caroline Graff, Florence Pasquier, Adeline Rollin, Vincent Deramecourt, Florence Lebert, Dimitrios Kapogiannis, Luigi Ferrucci, Stuart Pickering-Brown, Andrew B Singleton, John Hardy, Parastoo Momeni.
Lancet Neurol
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2014
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Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72--have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder.
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Different mutations at V363 MAPT codon are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes and show unusual structural and functional features.
Neurobiol. Aging
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
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Microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is one of the major genes linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a group of neurodegenerative diseases clinically, pathologically, and genetically heterogeneous. In particular, MAPT mutations give rise to the subgroup of tauopathies. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the MAPT mutations so far described are the decreased ability of tau protein to promote microtubule polymerization (missense mutations) or the altered ratio of tau isoforms (splicing mutations), both leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated filamentous tau protein. Following a genetic screening of patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration, we identified 2 MAPT mutations, V363I and V363A, leading to atypical clinical phenotypes, such as posterior cortical atrophy. We investigated in vitro features of the recombinant mutated tau isoforms and revealed unusual functional and structural characteristics such as an increased ability to promote microtubule polymerization and a tendency to form oligomeric instead of filamentous aggregates. Thus, we disclosed a greater than expected complexity of abnormal features of mutated tau isoforms. Overall our findings suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic.
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Mutations in MAPT give rise to aneuploidy in animal models of tauopathy.
Neurogenetics
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Tau is a major microtubule-associated protein in brain neurons. Its misfolding and accumulation cause neurodegenerative diseases characterized by brain atrophy and dementia, named tauopathies. Genetic forms are caused by mutations of microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT). Tau is expressed also in nonneural tissues such as lymphocytes. Tau has been recently recognized as a multifunctional protein, and in particular, some findings supported a role in genome stability. In fact, peripheral cells of patients affected by frontotemporal dementia carrying different MAPT mutations showed structural and numerical chromosome aberrations. The aim of this study was to assess chromosome stability in peripheral cell from two animal models of genetic tauopathy, JNPL3 and PS19 mouse strains expressing the human tau carrying the P301L and P301S mutations, respectively, to confirm the previous data on humans. After demonstrating the presence of mutated tau in spleen, we performed standard cytogenetic analysis of splenic lymphocytes from homozygous and hemizygous JNPL3, hemizygous PS19, and relevant controls. Losses and gains of chromosomes (aneuploidy) were evaluated. We detected a significantly higher level of aneuploidy in JNPL3 and PS19 than in control mice. Moreover, in JNPL3, the aneuploidy was higher in homozygotes than in hemizygotes, demonstrating a gene dose effect, which appeared also to be age independent. Our results show that mutated tau is associated with chromosome instability. It is conceivable to hypothesize that in genetic tauopathies the aneuploidy may be present also in central nervous system, possibly contributing to neurodegeneration.
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Optimal plasma progranulin cutoff value for predicting null progranulin mutations in neurodegenerative diseases: a multicenter Italian study.
Neurodegener Dis
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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Recently, attention was drawn to a role for progranulin in the central nervous system with the identification of mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN) as an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. GRN mutations are associated with a strong reduction of circulating progranulin and widely variable clinical phenotypes: thus, the dosage of plasma progranulin is a useful tool for a quick and inexpensive large-scale screening of carriers of GRN mutations.
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New mutations in MAPT gene causing frontotemporal lobar degeneration: biochemical and structural characterization.
Neurobiol. Aging
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2011
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Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be sporadic or familial. The genes encoding the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (GRN) are the most relevant genes so far known causing the hereditary forms. Following genetic screening of patients affected by FTLD, we identified 2 new MAPT mutations, P364S and G366R, the former in a sporadic case. In the study we report the clinical and genetic features of the patients carrying these mutations, and the functional effects of the mutations, analyzed in vitro in order to investigate their pathogenic character. Both mutations resulted in reduced ability of tau to promote microtubule polymerization; the P364S protein variant also showed a high propensity to aggregate into filaments. These results suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. Our findings highlight the importance of genetic analysis also in sporadic forms of FTLD, and the role of in vitro studies to evaluate the pathologic features of new mutations.
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A progranulin mutation associated with cortico-basal syndrome in an Italian family expressing different phenotypes of fronto-temporal lobar degeneration.
Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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Cortico-basal syndrome (CBS) is a rare neurodegenerative disease characterised by movement and cognitive disorders. It occurs along the spectrum of fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which also includes fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). FTLD has recently been shown to be associated with mutations in GRN gene, coding for progranulin, a multifunctional secreted glycoprotein involved in cell cycle, inflammation and tissue repair. We describe the case of a 73-year-old man suffering from CBS with a family history of cognitive disorders belonging to the clinical spectrum of FTLD. Sequencing analysis of GRN in this patient revealed that the C157KfsX97 null mutation has been already described by Le Ber et al. in a French patient affected by an apparently sporadic form of FTD. This report confirms the variability of clinical phenotypes associated with the same mutation and emphasises the importance of genetic analysis in cases with a clear familiarity, as well as in apparently sporadic forms.
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A recessive mutation in the APP gene with dominant-negative effect on amyloidogenesis.
Science
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2009
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beta-Amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations cause familial Alzheimers disease with nearly complete penetrance. We found an APP mutation [alanine-673-->valine-673 (A673V)] that causes disease only in the homozygous state, whereas heterozygous carriers were unaffected, consistent with a recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance. The A673V mutation affected APP processing, resulting in enhanced beta-amyloid (Abeta) production and formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. Co-incubation of mutated and wild-type peptides conferred instability on Abeta aggregates and inhibited amyloidogenesis and neurotoxicity. The highly amyloidogenic effect of the A673V mutation in the homozygous state and its anti-amyloidogenic effect in the heterozygous state account for the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and have implications for genetic screening and the potential treatment of Alzheimers disease.
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Strikingly different clinicopathological phenotypes determined by progranulin-mutation dosage.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
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We performed hypothesis-free linkage analysis and exome sequencing in a family with two siblings who had neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Two linkage peaks with maximum LOD scores of 3.07 and 2.97 were found on chromosomes 7 and 17, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found these siblings to be homozygous for a c.813_816del (p.Thr272Serfs?10) mutation in the progranulin gene (GRN, granulin precursor) in the latter peak. Heterozygous mutations in GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP), the second most common early-onset dementia. Reexamination of progranulin-deficient mice revealed rectilinear profiles typical of NCL. The age-at-onset and neuropathology of FTLD-TDP and NCL are markedly different. Our findings reveal an unanticipated link between a rare and a common neurological disorder and illustrate pleiotropic effects of a mutation in the heterozygous or homozygous states.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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