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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mobile DNA in cancer. Extensive transduction of nonrepetitive DNA mediated by L1 retrotransposition in cancer genomes.
Science
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2014
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Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (L1) retrotransposons are mobile repetitive elements that are abundant in the human genome. L1 elements propagate through RNA intermediates. In the germ line, neighboring, nonrepetitive sequences are occasionally mobilized by the L1 machinery, a process called 3' transduction. Because 3' transductions are potentially mutagenic, we explored the extent to which they occur somatically during tumorigenesis. Studying cancer genomes from 244 patients, we found that tumors from 53% of the patients had somatic retrotranspositions, of which 24% were 3' transductions. Fingerprinting of donor L1s revealed that a handful of source L1 elements in a tumor can spawn from tens to hundreds of 3' transductions, which can themselves seed further retrotranspositions. The activity of individual L1 elements fluctuated during tumor evolution and correlated with L1 promoter hypomethylation. The 3' transductions disseminated genes, exons, and regulatory elements to new locations, most often to heterochromatic regions of the genome.
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Confirmation of 5p12 as a susceptibility locus for progesterone-receptor-positive, lower grade breast cancer.
Roger L Milne, Ellen L Goode, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Fergus J Couch, Gianluca Severi, Rebecca Hein, Zachary Fredericksen, Nuria Malats, M Pilar Zamora, José Ignacio Arias Perez, Javier Benitez, Thilo Dörk, Peter Schürmann, Johann H Karstens, Peter Hillemanns, Angela Cox, Ian W Brock, Graeme Elliot, Simon S Cross, Sheila Seal, Clare Turnbull, Anthony Renwick, Nazneen Rahman, Chen-Yang Shen, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Chiun-Sheng Huang, Ming-Feng Hou, Børge G Nordestgaard, Stig E Bojesen, Charlotte Lanng, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Vessela Kristensen, Anne-Lise Børrensen-Dale, John L Hopper, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Diether Lambrechts, Betul T Yesilyurt, Giuseppe Floris, Karin Leunen, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Jenny Chang-Claude, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Siranoush Manoukian, Monica Barile, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Esther M John, Alexander Miron, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Mark E Sherman, Jonine D Figueroa, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Iosif V Zalutsky, Yuri I Rogov, Peter A Fasching, Christian M Bayer, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Hermann Brenner, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Anna Marie Mulligan, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Alfons Meindl, Joerg Heil, Claus R Bartram, Rita K Schmutzler, Gilles D Thomas, Robert N Hoover, Olivia Fletcher, Lorna J Gibson, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Julian Peto, Stefan Nickels, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Elinor Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael Kerin, Nicola Miller, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J van 't Veer, Rob A E M Tollenaar, Paul D P Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Karen A Pooley, Frederik Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Barbara Burwinkel, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska, Katarzyna Durda, Daehee Kang, Keun-Young Yoo, Dong-Young Noh, Sei-Hyun Ahn, David J Hunter, Susan E Hankinson, Peter Kraft, Sara Lindstrom, Xiaoqing Chen, Jonathan Beesley, Ute Hamann, Volker Harth, Christina Justenhoven, , Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Maartje Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Rogier A Oldenburg, Madeleine Tilanus-Linthorst, Elza Khusnutdinova, Marina Bermisheva, Darya Prokofieva, Albina Farahtdinova, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Manjeet K Humphreys, Qin Wang, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Douglas F Easton.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 5p12-rs10941679 has been found to be associated with risk of breast cancer, particularly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We aimed to further explore this association overall, and by tumor histopathology, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.
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Fine mapping of 14q24.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2011
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In the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) genome-wide association study of breast cancer, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker, rs999737, in the 14q24.1 interval, was associated with breast cancer risk. In order to fine map this region, we imputed a 3.93 MB region flanking rs999737 for Stages 1 and 2 of the CGEMS study (5,692 cases, 5,576 controls) using the combined reference panels of the HapMap 3 and the 1000 Genomes Project. Single-marker association testing and variable-sized sliding-window haplotype analysis were performed, and for both analyses the initial tagging SNP rs999737 retained the strongest association with breast cancer risk. Investigation of contiguous regions did not reveal evidence for an additional independent signal. Therefore, we conclude that rs999737 is an optimal tag SNP for common variants in the 14q24.1 region and thus narrow the candidate variants that should be investigated in follow-up laboratory evaluation.
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Application of a novel score test for genetic association incorporating gene-gene interaction suggests functionality for prostate cancer susceptibility regions.
Hum. Hered.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2011
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We introduce an innovative multilocus test for disease association. It is an extension of an existing score test that gains power over alternative methods by incorporating a parsimonious one-degree-of-freedom model for interaction. We use our method in applications designed to detect interactions that generate hypotheses about the functionality of prostate cancer (PRCA) susceptibility regions.
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Large-scale fine mapping of the HNF1B locus and prostate cancer risk.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2011
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Previous genome-wide association studies have identified two independent variants in HNF1B as susceptibility loci for prostate cancer risk. To fine-map common genetic variation in this region, we genotyped 79 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 17q12 region harboring HNF1B in 10 272 prostate cancer cases and 9123 controls of European ancestry from 10 case-control studies as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. Ten SNPs were significantly related to prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significance level of P < 5 × 10(-8) with the most significant association with rs4430796 (P = 1.62 × 10(-24)). However, risk within this first locus was not entirely explained by rs4430796. Although modestly correlated (r(2)= 0.64), rs7405696 was also associated with risk (P = 9.35 × 10(-23)) even after adjustment for rs4430769 (P = 0.007). As expected, rs11649743 was related to prostate cancer risk (P = 3.54 × 10(-8)); however, the association within this second locus was stronger for rs4794758 (P = 4.95 × 10(-10)), which explained all of the risk observed with rs11649743 when both SNPs were included in the same model (P = 0.32 for rs11649743; P = 0.002 for rs4794758). Sequential conditional analyses indicated that five SNPs (rs4430796, rs7405696, rs4794758, rs1016990 and rs3094509) together comprise the best model for risk in this region. This study demonstrates a complex relationship between variants in the HNF1B region and prostate cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the biological basis of the association of variants in 17q12 with prostate cancer.
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Fine mapping of a region of chromosome 11q13 reveals multiple independent loci associated with risk of prostate cancer.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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Genome-wide association studies have identified prostate cancer susceptibility alleles on chromosome 11q13. As part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative, the region flanking the most significant marker, rs10896449, was fine mapped in 10 272 cases and 9123 controls of European origin (10 studies) using 120 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected by a two-staged tagging strategy using HapMap SNPs. Single-locus analysis identified 18 SNPs below genome-wide significance (P< 10(-8)) with rs10896449 the most significant (P= 7.94 × 10(-19)). Multi-locus models that included significant SNPs sequentially identified a second association at rs12793759 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P= 4.76 × 10(-5), adjusted P= 0.004] that is independent of rs10896449 and remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing within the region. rs10896438, a proxy of previously reported rs12418451 (r(2)= 0.96), independent of both rs10896449 and rs12793759 was detected (OR = 1.07, P= 5.92 × 10(-3), adjusted P= 0.054). Our observation of a recombination hotspot that separates rs10896438 from rs10896449 and rs12793759, and low linkage disequilibrium (rs10896449-rs12793759, r(2)= 0.17; rs10896449-rs10896438, r(2)= 0.10; rs12793759-rs10896438, r(2)= 0.12) corroborate our finding of three independent signals. By analysis of tagged SNPs across ?123 kb using next generation sequencing of 63 controls of European origin, 1000 Genome and HapMap data, we observed multiple surrogates for the three independent signals marked by rs10896449 (n= 31), rs10896438 (n= 24) and rs12793759 (n= 8). Our results indicate that a complex architecture underlying the common variants contributing to prostate cancer risk at 11q13. We estimate that at least 63 common variants should be considered in future studies designed to investigate the biological basis of the multiple association signals.
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Large-scale exploration of gene-gene interactions in prostate cancer using a multistage genome-wide association study.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2011
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Recent genome-wide association studies have identified independent susceptibility loci for prostate cancer that could influence risk through interaction with other, possibly undetected, susceptibility loci. We explored evidence of interaction between pairs of 13 known susceptibility loci and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across the genome to generate hypotheses about the functionality of prostate cancer susceptibility regions. We used data from Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility: Stage I included 523,841 SNPs in 1,175 cases and 1,100 controls; Stage II included 27,383 SNPs in an additional 3,941 cases and 3,964 controls. Power calculations assessed the magnitude of interactions our study is likely to detect. Logistic regression was used with alternative methods that exploit constraints of gene-gene independence between unlinked loci to increase power. Our empirical evaluation demonstrated that an empirical Bayes (EB) technique is powerful and robust to possible violation of the independence assumption. Our EB analysis identified several noteworthy interacting SNP pairs, although none reached genome-wide significance. We highlight a Stage II interaction between the major prostate cancer susceptibility locus in the subregion of 8q24 that contains POU5F1B and an intronic SNP in the transcription factor EPAS1, which has potentially important functional implications for 8q24. Another noteworthy result involves interaction of a known prostate cancer susceptibility marker near the prostate protease genes KLK2 and KLK3 with an intronic SNP in PRXX2. Overall, the interactions we have identified merit follow-up study, particularly the EPAS1 interaction, which has implications not only in prostate cancer but also in other epithelial cancers that are associated with the 8q24 locus.
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Fine mapping the KLK3 locus on chromosome 19q13.33 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility and PSA levels.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
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Measurements of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) protein levels form the basis for a widely used test to screen men for prostate cancer. Germline variants in the gene that encodes the PSA protein (KLK3) have been shown to be associated with both serum PSA levels and prostate cancer. Based on a resequencing analysis of a 56 kb region on chromosome 19q13.33, centered on the KLK3 gene, we fine mapped this locus by genotyping tag SNPs in 3,522 prostate cancer cases and 3,338 controls from five case-control studies. We did not observe a strong association with the KLK3 variant, reported in previous studies to confer risk for prostate cancer (rs2735839; P = 0.20) but did observe three highly correlated SNPs (rs17632542, rs62113212 and rs62113214) associated with prostate cancer [P = 3.41 × 10(-4), per-allele trend odds ratio (OR) = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.67-0.89]. The signal was apparent only for nonaggressive prostate cancer cases with Gleason score <7 and disease stage 8 or stage ?III (P = 0.31, per-allele trend OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.90-1.40). One of the three highly correlated SNPs, rs17632542, introduces a non-synonymous amino acid change in the KLK3 protein with a predicted benign or neutral functional impact. Baseline PSA levels were 43.7% higher in control subjects with no minor alleles (1.61 ng/ml, 95% CI = 1.49-1.72) than in those with one or more minor alleles at any one of the three SNPs (1.12 ng/ml, 95% CI = 0.96-1.28) (P = 9.70 × 10(-5)). Together our results suggest that germline KLK3 variants could influence the diagnosis of nonaggressive prostate cancer by influencing the likelihood of biopsy.
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Comprehensive analysis of common genetic variation in 61 genes related to steroid hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I metabolism and breast cancer risk in the NCI breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2010
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There is extensive evidence that increases in blood and tissue concentrations of steroid hormones and of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are associated with breast cancer risk. However, studies of common variation in genes involved in steroid hormone and IGF-I metabolism have yet to provide convincing evidence that such variants predict breast cancer risk. The Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) is a collaboration of large US and European cohorts. We genotyped 1416 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 steroid hormone metabolism genes and 24 IGF-I pathway genes in 6292 cases of breast cancer and 8135 controls, mostly Caucasian, postmenopausal women from the BPC3. We also imputed 3921 additional SNPs in the regions of interest. None of the SNPs tested was significantly associated with breast cancer risk, after correction for multiple comparisons. The results remained null when cases and controls were stratified by age at diagnosis/recruitment, advanced or nonadvanced disease, body mass index, with or without in situ cases; or restricted to Caucasians. Among 770 estrogen receptor-negative cases, an SNP located 3 of growth hormone receptor (GHR) was marginally associated with increased risk after correction for multiple testing (P(trend) = 1.5 × 10(-4)). We found no significant overall associations between breast cancer and common germline variation in 61 genes involved in steroid hormone and IGF-I metabolism in this large, comprehensive study. Although previous studies have shown that variations in these genes can influence endogenous hormone levels, the magnitude of the effect of single SNPs does not appear to be sufficient to alter breast cancer risk.
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Genetic admixture and population substructure in Guanacaste Costa Rica.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2010
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The population of Costa Rica (CR) represents an admixture of major continental populations. An investigation of the CR population structure would provide an important foundation for mapping genetic variants underlying common diseases and traits. We conducted an analysis of 1,301 women from the Guanacaste region of CR using 27,904 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on a custom Illumina InfiniumII iSelect chip. The program STRUCTURE was used to compare the CR Guanacaste sample with four continental reference samples, including HapMap Europeans (CEU), East Asians (JPT+CHB), West African Yoruba (YRI), as well as Native Americans (NA) from the Illumina iControl database. Our results show that the CR Guanacaste sample comprises a three-way admixture estimated to be 43% European, 38% Native American and 15% West African. An estimated 4% residual Asian ancestry may be within the error range. Results from principal components analysis reveal a correlation between genetic and geographic distance. The magnitude of linkage disequilibrium (LD) measured by the number of tagging SNPs required to cover the same region in the genome in the CR Guanacaste sample appeared to be weaker than that observed in CEU, JPT+CHB and NA reference samples but stronger than that of the HapMap YRI sample. Based on the clustering pattern observed in both STRUCTURE and principal components analysis, two subpopulations were identified that differ by approximately 20% in LD block size averaged over all LD blocks identified by Haploview. We also show in a simulated association study conducted within the two subpopulations, that the failure to account for population stratification (PS) could lead to a noticeable inflation in the false positive rate. However, we further demonstrate that existing PS adjustment approaches can reduce the inflation to an acceptable level for gene discovery.
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Genome-wide association study of renal cell carcinoma identifies two susceptibility loci on 2p21 and 11q13.3.
Mark P Purdue, Mattias Johansson, Diana Zelenika, Jorge R Toro, Ghislaine Scelo, Lee E Moore, Egor Prokhortchouk, Xifeng Wu, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Valerie Gaborieau, Kevin B Jacobs, Wong-Ho Chow, David Zaridze, Vsevolod Matveev, Jan Lubiński, Joanna Trubicka, Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Jolanta Lissowska, Peter Rudnai, Eleonóra Fabiánová, Alexandru Bucur, Vladimír Bencko, Lenka Foretova, Vladimir Janout, Paolo Boffetta, Joanne S Colt, Faith G Davis, Kendra L Schwartz, Rosamonde E Banks, Peter J Selby, Patricia Harnden, Christine D Berg, Ann W Hsing, Robert L Grubb, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Vineis, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Domenico Palli, Rosario Tumino, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Eric J Duell, José Ramón Quirós, Maria-Jose Sanchez, Carmen Navarro, Eva Ardanaz, Miren Dorronsoro, Kay-Tee Khaw, Naomi E Allen, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Petra H M Peeters, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Jakob Linseisen, Börje Ljungberg, Kim Overvad, Anne Tjønneland, Isabelle Romieu, Elio Riboli, Anush Mukeria, Oxana Shangina, Victoria L Stevens, Michael J Thun, W Ryan Diver, Susan M Gapstur, Paul D Pharoah, Douglas F Easton, Demetrius Albanes, Stephanie J Weinstein, Jarmo Virtamo, Lars Vatten, Kristian Hveem, Inger Njølstad, Grethe S Tell, Camilla Stoltenberg, Rajiv Kumar, Kvetoslava Koppova, Olivier Cussenot, Simone Benhamou, Egbert Oosterwijk, Sita H Vermeulen, Katja K H Aben, Saskia L van der Marel, Yuanqing Ye, Christopher G Wood, Xia Pu, Alexander M Mazur, Eugenia S Boulygina, Nikolai N Chekanov, Mario Foglio, Doris Lechner, Ivo Gut, Simon Heath, Hélène Blanché, Amy Hutchinson, Gilles Thomas, Zhaoming Wang, Meredith Yeager, Joseph F Fraumeni, Konstantin G Skryabin, James D McKay, Nathaniel Rothman, Stephen J Chanock, Mark Lathrop, Paul Brennan.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2010
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We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in 3,772 affected individuals (cases) and 8,505 controls of European background from 11 studies and followed up 6 SNPs in 3 replication studies of 2,198 cases and 4,918 controls. Two loci on the regions of 2p21 and 11q13.3 were associated with RCC susceptibility below genome-wide significance. Two correlated variants (r² = 0.99 in controls), rs11894252 (P = 1.8 × 10??) and rs7579899 (P = 2.3 × 10??), map to EPAS1 on 2p21, which encodes hypoxia-inducible-factor-2 alpha, a transcription factor previously implicated in RCC. The second locus, rs7105934, at 11q13.3, contains no characterized genes (P = 7.8 × 10?¹?). In addition, we observed a promising association on 12q24.31 for rs4765623, which maps to SCARB1, the scavenger receptor class B, member 1 gene (P = 2.6 × 10??). Our study reports previously unidentified genomic regions associated with RCC risk that may lead to new etiological insights.
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Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2010
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Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 x 10(-3)) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90, P(trend) = 3.6 x 10(-4) and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41, P(trend) = 4.2 x 10(-4)), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25-1.92, P(trend) = 6 x 10(-5) and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62, P(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-4)). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations.
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Risk of meningioma and common variation in genes related to innate immunity.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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The etiology of meningioma, the second most common type of adult brain tumor in the United States, is largely unknown. Prior studies indicate that history of immune-related conditions may affect the risk of meningioma.
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Refining the prostate cancer genetic association within the JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (PrCa). In the two-stage Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility prostate cancer scan, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10486567, located within intron 2 of JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2, showed a promising association with PrCa overall (P=2.14x10(-6)), with a suggestion of stronger association with aggressive disease (P=1.2x10(-7)).
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International network of cancer genome projects.
, Thomas J Hudson, Warwick Anderson, Axel Artez, Anna D Barker, Cindy Bell, Rosa R Bernabé, M K Bhan, Fabien Calvo, Iiro Eerola, Daniela S Gerhard, Alan Guttmacher, Mark Guyer, Fiona M Hemsley, Jennifer L Jennings, David Kerr, Peter Klatt, Patrik Kolar, Jun Kusada, David P Lane, Frank Laplace, Lu Youyong, Gerd Nettekoven, Brad Ozenberger, Jane Peterson, T S Rao, Jacques Remacle, Alan J Schafer, Tatsuhiro Shibata, Michael R Stratton, Joseph G Vockley, Koichi Watanabe, Huanming Yang, Matthew M F Yuen, Bartha M Knoppers, Martin Bobrow, Anne Cambon-Thomsen, Lynn G Dressler, Stephanie O M Dyke, Yann Joly, Kazuto Kato, Karen L Kennedy, Pilar Nicolás, Michael J Parker, Emmanuelle Rial-Sebbag, Carlos M Romeo-Casabona, Kenna M Shaw, Susan Wallace, Georgia L Wiesner, Nikolajs Zeps, Peter Lichter, Andrew V Biankin, Christian Chabannon, Lynda Chin, Bruno Clément, Enrique De Alava, Françoise Degos, Martin L Ferguson, Peter Geary, D Neil Hayes, Amber L Johns, Arek Kasprzyk, Hidewaki Nakagawa, Robert Penny, Miguel A Piris, Rajiv Sarin, Aldo Scarpa, Marc van de Vijver, P Andrew Futreal, Hiroyuki Aburatani, Mònica Bayés, David D L Botwell, Peter J Campbell, Xavier Estivill, Sean M Grimmond, Ivo Gut, Martin Hirst, Carlos Lopez-Otin, Partha Majumder, Marco Marra, John D McPherson, Zemin Ning, Xose S Puente, Yijun Ruan, Hendrik G Stunnenberg, Harold Swerdlow, Victor E Velculescu, Richard K Wilson, Hong H Xue, Liu Yang, Paul T Spellman, Gary D Bader, Paul C Boutros, Paul Flicek, Gad Getz, Roderic Guigo, Guangwu Guo, David Haussler, Simon Heath, Tim J Hubbard, Tao Jiang, Steven M Jones, Qibin Li, Nuria López-Bigas, Ruibang Luo, Lakshmi Muthuswamy, B F Francis Ouellette, John V Pearson, Víctor Quesada, Benjamin J Raphael, Chris Sander, Terence P Speed, Lincoln D Stein, Joshua M Stuart, Jon W Teague, Yasushi Totoki, Tatsuhiko Tsunoda, Alfonso Valencia, David A Wheeler, Honglong Wu, Shancen Zhao, Guangyu Zhou, Mark Lathrop, Gilles Thomas, Teruhiko Yoshida, Myles Axton, Chris Gunter, Linda J Miller, Junjun Zhang, Syed A Haider, Jianxin Wang, Christina K Yung, Anthony Cros, Anthony Cross, Yong Liang, Saravanamuttu Gnaneshan, Jonathan Guberman, Jack Hsu, Don R C Chalmers, Karl W Hasel, Terry S H Kaan, William W Lowrance, Tohru Masui, Laura Lyman Rodriguez, Catherine Vergely, David D L Bowtell, Nicole Cloonan, Anna deFazio, James R Eshleman, Dariush Etemadmoghadam, Brooke B Gardiner, Brooke A Gardiner, James G Kench, Robert L Sutherland, Margaret A Tempero, Nicola J Waddell, Peter J Wilson, Steve Gallinger, Ming-Sound Tsao, Patricia A Shaw, Gloria M Petersen, Debabrata Mukhopadhyay, Ronald A DePinho, Sarah Thayer, Kamran Shazand, Timothy Beck, Michelle Sam, Lee Timms, Vanessa Ballin, Youyong Lu, Jiafu Ji, Xiuqing Zhang, Feng Chen, Xueda Hu, Qi Yang, Geng Tian, Lianhai Zhang, Xiaofang Xing, Xianghong Li, Zhenggang Zhu, Yingyan Yu, Jun Yu, Jörg Tost, Paul Brennan, Ivana Holcatova, David Zaridze, Alvis Brazma, Lars Egevard, Egor Prokhortchouk, Rosamonde Elizabeth Banks, Mathias Uhlén, Juris Viksna, Fredrik Ponten, Konstantin Skryabin, Ewan Birney, Ake Borg, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Carlos Caldas, John A Foekens, Sancha Martin, Jorge S Reis-Filho, Andrea L Richardson, Christos Sotiriou, Giles Thoms, Laura van't Veer, Daniel Birnbaum, Hélène Blanché, Pascal Boucher, Sandrine Boyault, Jocelyne D Masson-Jacquemier, Iris Pauporté, Xavier Pivot, Anne Vincent-Salomon, Eric Tabone, Charles Theillet, Isabelle Treilleux, Paulette Bioulac-Sage, Thomas Decaens, Dominique Franco, Marta Gut, Didier Samuel, Jessica Zucman-Rossi, Roland Eils, Benedikt Brors, Jan O Korbel, Andrey Korshunov, Pablo Landgraf, Hans Lehrach, Stefan Pfister, Bernhard Radlwimmer, Guido Reifenberger, Michael D Taylor, Christof von Kalle, Partha P Majumder, Paolo Pederzoli, Rita A Lawlor, Massimo Delledonne, Alberto Bardelli, Thomas Gress, David Klimstra, Giuseppe Zamboni, Yusuke Nakamura, Satoru Miyano, Akihiro Fujimoto, Elias Campo, Silvia de Sanjosé, Emili Montserrat, Marcos Gonzalez-Díaz, Pedro Jares, Heinz Himmelbauer, Heinz Himmelbaue, Sílvia Beà, Samuel Aparicio, Douglas F Easton, Francis S Collins, Carolyn C Compton, Eric S Lander, Wylie Burke, Anthony R Green, Stanley R Hamilton, Olli P Kallioniemi, Timothy J Ley, Edison T Liu, Brandon J Wainwright.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) was launched to coordinate large-scale cancer genome studies in tumours from 50 different cancer types and/or subtypes that are of clinical and societal importance across the globe. Systematic studies of more than 25,000 cancer genomes at the genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic levels will reveal the repertoire of oncogenic mutations, uncover traces of the mutagenic influences, define clinically relevant subtypes for prognosis and therapeutic management, and enable the development of new cancer therapies.
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Mosaic uniparental disomies and aneuploidies as large structural variants of the human genome.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2010
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Mosaicism is defined as the coexistence of cells with different genetic composition within an individual, caused by postzygotic somatic mutation. Although somatic mosaicism for chromosomal abnormalities is a well-established cause of developmental and somatic disorders and has also been detected in different tissues, its frequency and extent in the adult normal population are still unknown. We provide here a genome-wide survey of mosaic genomic variation obtained by analyzing Illumina 1M SNP array data from blood or buccal DNA samples of 1991 adult individuals from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO genome-wide association study. We found mosaic abnormalities in autosomes in 1.7% of samples, including 23 segmental uniparental disomies, 8 complete trisomies, and 11 large (1.5-37 Mb) copy-number variants. Alterations were observed across the different autosomes with recurrent events in chromosomes 9 and 20. No case-control differences were found in the frequency of events or the percentage of cells affected, thus indicating that most rearrangements found are not central to the development of bladder cancer. However, five out of six events tested were detected in both blood and bladder tissue from the same individual, indicating an early developmental origin. The high cellular frequency of the anomalies detected and their presence in normal adult individuals suggest that this type of mosaicism is a widespread phenomenon in the human genome. Somatic mosaicism should be considered in the expanding repertoire of inter- and intraindividual genetic variation, some of which may cause somatic human diseases but also contribute to modifying inherited disorders and/or late-onset multifactorial traits.
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A genome-wide association study of prognosis in breast cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2010
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Traditional clinicopathologic features of breast cancer do not account for all the variation in survival. Germline genetic variation may provide additional prognostic information.
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Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan).
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2010
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The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) nested case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed no significant overall association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake and pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.86-2.23, for 60 or more g/day vs. >0 to <5 g/day). A statistically significant increase in risk was observed among men consuming 45 or more grams of alcohol from liquor per day (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.02-4.87, compared to 0 g/day of alcohol from liquor, P-trend = 0.12), but not among women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.63-2.87, for 30 or more g/day of alcohol from liquor, compared to none). No associations were noted for wine or beer intake. Overall, no significant increase in risk was observed, but a small effect among heavy drinkers cannot be ruled out.
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Pooled analysis of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway variants and risk of prostate cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2010
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The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway regulates various cellular processes, including cellular proliferation and intracellular trafficking, and may affect prostate carcinogenesis. Thus, we explored the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in PI3K genes and prostate cancer. Pooled data from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium were examined for associations between 89 SNPs in PI3K genes (PIK3C2B, PIK3AP1, PIK3C2A, PIK3CD, and PIK3R3) and prostate cancer risk in 8,309 cases and 9,286 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using logistic regression. SNP rs7556371 in PIK3C2B was significantly associated with prostate cancer risk [OR(per allele), 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.14); P(trend) = 0.0017] after adjustment for multiple testing (P(adj) = 0.024). Simultaneous adjustment of rs7556371 for nearby SNPs strengthened the association [OR(per allele), 1.21 (95% CI, 1.09-1.34); P(trend) = 0.0003]. The adjusted association was stronger for men who were diagnosed before the age of 65 years [OR(per allele), 1.47 (95% CI, 1.20-1.79); P(trend) = 0.0001] or had a family history [OR(per allele) = 1.57 (95% CI, 1.11-2.23); P(trend) = 0.0114], and was strongest in those with both characteristics [OR(per allele) = 2.31 (95% CI, 1.07-5.07), P-interaction = 0.005]. Increased risks were observed among men in the top tertile of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels [OR(per allele) = 1.46 (95% CI, 1.04-2.06); P(trend) = 0.075]. No differences were observed with disease aggressiveness (Gleason grade >or=8 or stage T(3)/T(4) or fatal). In conclusion, we observed a significant association between PIK3C2B and prostate cancer risk, especially for familial, early-onset disease, which may be attributable to IGF-dependent PI3K signaling.
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Pancreatic cancer risk and ABO blood group alleles: results from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2010
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A recent genome-wide association study (PanScan) identified significant associations at the ABO gene locus with risk of pancreatic cancer, but the influence of specific ABO genotypes remains unknown. We determined ABO genotypes (OO, AO, AA, AB, BO, and BB) in 1,534 cases and 1,583 controls from 12 prospective cohorts in PanScan, grouping participants by genotype-derived serologic blood type (O, A, AB, and B). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer by ABO alleles were calculated using logistic regression. Compared with blood type O, the ORs for pancreatic cancer in subjects with types A, AB, and B were 1.38 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.18-1.62], 1.47 (95% CI, 1.07-2.02), and 1.53 (95% CI, 1.21-1.92), respectively. The incidence rates for blood types O, A, AB, and B were 28.9, 39.9, 41.8, and 44.5 cases per 100,000 subjects per year. An increase in risk was noted with the addition of each non-O allele. Compared with OO genotype, subjects with AO and AA genotype had ORs of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.13-1.58) and 1.61 (95% CI, 1.22-2.18), whereas subjects with BO and BB genotypes had ORs of 1.45 (95% CI, 1.14-1.85) and 2.42 (1.28-4.57). The population attributable fraction for non-O blood type was 19.5%. In a joint model with smoking, current smokers with non-O blood type had an adjusted OR of 2.68 (95% CI, 2.03-3.54) compared with nonsmokers of blood type O. We concluded that ABO genotypes were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk.
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Novel breast cancer risk alleles and interaction with ionizing radiation among U.S. radiologic technologists.
Radiat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2010
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As genome-wide association studies of breast cancer are replicating findings and refinement studies are narrowing the signal location, additional efforts are necessary to elucidate the underlying functional relationships. One approach is to evaluate variation in risk by genotype based on known breast carcinogens, such as ionizing radiation. Given the public health concerns associated with recent increases in medical radiation exposure, this approach may also identify potentially susceptible subpopulations. We examined interaction between 27 newly identified breast cancer risk alleles (identified within the NCI Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium genome-wide association studies) and occupational and medical diagnostic radiation exposure among 859 cases and 1083 controls nested within the United States Radiologic Technologists cohort. We did not find significant variation in the radiation-related breast cancer risk for the variant in RAD51L1 (rs10483813) on 14q24.1 as we had hypothesized. In exploratory analyses, we found that the radiation-associated breast cancer risk varied significantly by linked markers in 5p12 (rs930395, rs10941679, rs2067980 and rs4415084) in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S30 (MRPS30) gene (P(interaction) = 0.04). Chance, however, may explain these findings, and as such, these results need to be confirmed in other populations with low to moderate levels of radiation exposure. Even though a complete understanding of the way(s) in which these variants may increase breast cancer risk remains elusive, this approach may yield clues for further investigation.
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A genome-wide association study identifies pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2010
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We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies.
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Family history of cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan).
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e., ovarian, breast and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of 5 types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer [multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.61]. A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12-1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.52-1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.51) or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.93-1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study.
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PTGS2 and IL6 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer: results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3).
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 12-04-2009
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Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostate cancers. We conducted a study within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine the association between IL6 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and breast and prostate cancer risk. Twenty-seven polymorphisms, selected by pairwise tagging, were genotyped on 6292 breast cancer cases and 8135 matched controls and 8008 prostate cancer cases and 8604 matched controls. The large sample sizes and comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism tagging in this study gave us excellent power to detect modest effects for common variants. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of the associations examined remained statistically significant at P = 0.01. In analyses not adjusted for multiple testing, one IL6 polymorphism (rs6949149) was marginally associated with breast cancer risk (TT versus GG, odds ratios (OR): 1.32; 99% confidence intervals (CI): 1.00-1.74, P(trend) = 0.003) and two were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk (rs6969502-AA versus rs6969502-GG, OR: 0.87, 99% CI: 0.75-1.02; P(trend) = 0.002 and rs7805828-AA versus rs7805828-GG, OR: 1.11, 99% CI: 0.99-1.26; P(trend) = 0.007). An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for the PTGS2 polymorphism rs7550380 (TT versus GG, OR: 1.38, 99% CI: 1.04-1.83). No association was observed between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. In conclusion, common genetic variation in these two genes might play at best a limited role in breast and prostate cancers.
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A comprehensive resequence analysis of the KLK15-KLK3-KLK2 locus on chromosome 19q13.33.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the KLK3 gene on chromosome 19q13.33 are associated with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Recent genome wide association studies of prostate cancer have yielded conflicting results for association of the same SNPs with prostate cancer risk. Since the KLK3 gene encodes the PSA protein that forms the basis for a widely used screening test for prostate cancer, it is critical to fully characterize genetic variation in this region and assess its relationship with the risk of prostate cancer. We have conducted a next-generation sequence analysis in 78 individuals of European ancestry to characterize common (minor allele frequency, MAF >1%) genetic variation in a 56 kb region on chromosome 19q13.33 centered on the KLK3 gene (chr19:56,019,829-56,076,043 bps). We identified 555 polymorphic loci in the process including 116 novel SNPs and 182 novel insertion/deletion polymorphisms (indels). Based on tagging analysis, 144 loci are necessary to tag the region at an r (2) threshold of 0.8 and MAF of 1% or higher, while 86 loci are required to tag the region at an r (2) threshold of 0.8 and MAF >5%. Our sequence data augments coverage by 35 and 78% as compared to variants in dbSNP and HapMap, respectively. We observed six non-synonymous amino acid or frame shift changes in the KLK3 gene and three changes in each of the neighboring genes, KLK15 and KLK2. Our study has generated a detailed map of common genetic variation in the genomic region surrounding the KLK3 gene, which should be useful for fine-mapping the association signal as well as determining the contribution of this locus to prostate cancer risk and/or regulation of PSA expression.
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Quantitative trait loci predicting circulating sex steroid hormones in men from the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3).
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2009
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Twin studies suggest a heritable component to circulating sex steroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). In the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, 874 SNPs in 37 candidate genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway were examined in relation to circulating levels of SHBG (N = 4720), testosterone (N = 4678), 3 alpha-androstanediol-glucuronide (N = 4767) and 17beta-estradiol (N = 2014) in Caucasian men. rs1799941 in SHBG is highly significantly associated with circulating levels of SHBG (P = 4.52 x 10(-21)), consistent with previous studies, and testosterone (P = 7.54 x 10(-15)), with mean difference of 26.9 and 14.3%, respectively, comparing wild-type to homozygous variant carriers. Further noteworthy novel findings were observed between SNPs in ESR1 with testosterone levels (rs722208, mean difference = 8.8%, P = 7.37 x 10(-6)) and SRD5A2 with 3 alpha-androstanediol-glucuronide (rs2208532, mean difference = 11.8%, P = 1.82 x 10(-6)). Genetic variation in genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway is associated with differences in circulating SHBG and sex steroid hormones.
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Comprehensive resequence analysis of a 97 kb region of chromosome 10q11.2 containing the MSMB gene associated with prostate cancer.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2009
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Genome-wide association studies of prostate cancer have identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in a region of chromosome 10q11.2, harboring the microseminoprotein-? (MSMB) gene. Both the gene product of MSMB, the prostate secretory protein 94 (PSP94) and its binding protein (PSPBP), have been previously investigated as serum biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. Recent functional work has shown that different alleles of the significantly associated SNP in the promoter of MSMB found to be associated with prostate cancer risk, rs10993994, can influence its expression in tumors and in vitro studies. Since it is plausible that additional variants in this region contribute to the risk of prostate cancer, we have used next-generation sequencing technology to resequence a ~97-kb region that includes the area surrounding MSMB (chr10: 51,168,025-51,265,101) in 36 prostate cancer cases, 26 controls of European origin, and 8 unrelated CEPH individuals in order to identify additional variants to investigate in functional studies. We identified 241 novel polymorphisms within this region, including 142 in the 51-kb block of linkage disequilibrium (LD) that contains rs10993994 and the proximal promoter of MSMB. No sites were observed to be polymorphic within the exons of MSMB.
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Estimation of absolute risk for prostate cancer using genetic markers and family history.
Prostate
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2009
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Multiple DNA sequence variants in the form of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be reproducibly associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk.
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Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2009
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Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, detailed examination of the association of smoking intensity, smoking duration, and cumulative smoking dose with pancreatic cancer is limited. The authors analyzed pooled data from the international Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium nested case-control study (1,481 cases, 1,539 controls). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression. Smoking intensity effects were examined with an excess odds ratio model that was linear in pack-years and exponential in cigarettes smoked per day and its square. When compared with never smokers, current smokers had a significantly elevated risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38, 2.26). Risk increased significantly with greater intensity (> or =30 cigarettes/day: OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.42), duration (> or =50 years: OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.25, 3.62), and cumulative smoking dose (> or =40 pack-years: OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.35, 2.34). Risk more than 15 years after smoking cessation was similar to that for never smokers. Estimates of excess odds ratio per pack-year declined with increasing intensity, suggesting greater risk for total exposure delivered at lower intensity for longer duration than for higher intensity for shorter duration. This finding and the decline in risk after smoking cessation suggest that smoking has a late-stage effect on pancreatic carcinogenesis.
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Common variation in genes related to innate immunity and risk of adult glioma.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2009
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Current evidence suggests that immune system alterations contribute to the etiology of adult glioma, the most common adult brain tumor. Although previous studies have focused on variation in candidate genes in the adaptive immune system, the innate immune system has emerged as a critical avenue for research given its known link with carcinogenesis. To identify genetic markers in pathways critical to innate immunity, we conducted an association study of 551 glioma cases and 865 matched controls of European ancestry to investigate "tag" single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 148 genetic regions. Two independent U.S. case-control studies included were as follows: a hospital-based study conducted by the National Cancer Institute (263 cases, 330 controls) and a community-based study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (288 cases, 535 controls). Tag SNPs (1,397) chosen on the basis of an r(2) of >0.8 and minor allele frequency of >5% in Caucasians in HapMap1 were genotyped. Glioma risk was estimated by odds ratios. Nine SNPs distributed across eight genetic regions (ALOX5, IRAK3, ITGB2, NCF2, NFKB1, SELP, SOD1, and STAT1) were associated with risk of glioma with P value of <0.01. Although these associations were no longer statistically significant after controlling for multiple comparisons, the associations were notably consistent in both studies. Region-based tests were statistically significant (P < 0.05) for SELP, SOD, and ALOX5. Analyses restricted to glioblastoma (n = 254) yielded significant associations for the SELP, DEFB126/127, SERPINI1, and LY96 genetic regions. We have identified a promising set of innate immunity-related genetic regions for further investigation.
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A new statistic and its power to infer membership in a genome-wide association study using genotype frequencies.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2009
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Aggregate results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), such as genotype frequencies for cases and controls, were until recently often made available on public websites because they were thought to disclose negligible information concerning an individuals participation in a study. Homer et al. recently suggested that a method for forensic detection of an individuals contribution to an admixed DNA sample could be applied to aggregate GWAS data. Using a likelihood-based statistical framework, we developed an improved statistic that uses genotype frequencies and individual genotypes to infer whether a specific individual or any close relatives participated in the GWAS and, if so, what the participants phenotype status is. Our statistic compares the logarithm of genotype frequencies, in contrast to that of Homer et al., which is based on differences in either SNP probe intensity or allele frequencies. We derive the theoretical power of our test statistics and explore the empirical performance in scenarios with varying numbers of randomly chosen or top-associated SNPs.
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Fine mapping and functional analysis of a common variant in MSMB on chromosome 10q11.2 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2009
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Two recent genome-wide association studies have independently identified a prostate cancer susceptibility locus on chromosome 10q11.2. The most significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker reported, rs10993994, is 57 bp centromeric of the first exon of the MSMB gene, which encodes beta-microseminoprotein (prostatic secretory protein 94). In this study, a fine-mapping analysis using HapMap SNPs was conducted across a approximately 65-kb region (chr10: 51168330-51234020) flanking rs10993994 with 13 tag SNPs in 6,118 prostate cancer cases and 6,105 controls of European origin from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project. rs10993994 remained the most strongly associated marker with prostate cancer risk [P = 8.8 x 10(-18); heterozygous odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.30; homozygous OR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.47-1.86 for the adjusted genotype test with 2 df]. In follow-up functional analyses, the T variant of rs10993994 significantly affected expression of in vitro luciferase reporter constructs. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, the C allele of rs10993994 preferentially binds to the CREB transcription factor. Analysis of tumor cell lines with a CC or CT genotype revealed a high level of MSMB gene expression compared with cell lines with a TT genotype. These findings were specific to the alleles of rs10993994 and were not observed for other SNPs determined by sequence analysis of the proximal promoter. Together, our mapping study and functional analyses implicate regulation of expression of MSMB as a plausible mechanism accounting for the association identified at this locus. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether rs10993994 alone or in combination with additional variants contributes to prostate cancer susceptibility.
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Validating, augmenting and refining genome-wide association signals.
Nat. Rev. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2009
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Studies using genome-wide platforms have yielded an unprecedented number of promising signals of association between genomic variants and human traits. This Review addresses the steps required to validate, augment and refine such signals to identify underlying causal variants for well-defined phenotypes. These steps include: large-scale exact replication across both similar and diverse populations; fine mapping and resequencing; determination of the most informative markers and multiple independent informative loci; incorporation of functional information; and improved phenotype mapping of the implicated genetic effects. Even in cases for which replication proves that an effect exists, confident localization of the causal variant often remains elusive.
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[Genome-wide association approach].
Med Sci (Paris)
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2009
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The genome-wide association approach has been the most powerful and efficient study design thus far in identifying genetic variants that are associated with complex human diseases. This approach became feasible as the result of several key advancements in genetic knowledge, genotyping technologies, statistical analysis algorithms and the availability of large collections of cases and controls. With all these necessary tools in hand, many genome-wide association studies were recently completed, and many more studies which will explore the genetic basis of various complex diseases and quantitative traits are soon to come. The recent large genotyping studies have identified a new repertoire of cancer susceptibility genes and loci which are characterized by common risk alleles. Many of these loci were detected at low power, indicating that many further loci will probably be detected with larger studies. For the most part, the loci were not previously suspected to be related to carcinogenesis, and point to new disease mechanisms. The risks conferred by the susceptibility alleles are low, generally 1.3-fold or less. The combined effects may, however, be sufficiently large to be useful for risk prediction, and targeted screening and prevention, particularly as more loci are identified.
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Genome-wide association study of tanning phenotype in a population of European ancestry.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2009
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We conducted a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of tanning response after exposure to sunlight in over 9,000 men and women of European ancestry who live in the United States. An initial analysis of 528,173 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified LOC401937 (rs966321) on chromosome 1 as a novel locus highly associated with tanning ability, and we confirmed this association in 870 women controls from a skin cancer case-control study with joint P-value=1.6 x 10(-9). We further genotyped this SNP in two subsequent replication studies (one with 3,750 women and the other with 2,405 men). This association was not replicated in either of these two studies. We found that several SNPs reaching the genome-wide significance level are located in or adjacent to the loci previously known as pigmentation genes: MATP, IRF4, TYR, OCA2, and MC1R. Overall, these tanning ability-related loci are similar to the hair color-related loci previously reported in the GWAS of hair color.
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Genome-wide association study identifies variants in the ABO locus associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2009
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We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer, a cancer with one of the lowest survival rates worldwide. We genotyped 558,542 SNPs in 1,896 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 1,939 controls drawn from 12 prospective cohorts plus one hospital-based case-control study. We conducted a combined analysis of these groups plus an additional 2,457 affected individuals and 2,654 controls from eight case-control studies, adjusting for study, sex, ancestry and five principal components. We identified an association between a locus on 9q34 and pancreatic cancer marked by the SNP rs505922 (combined P = 5.37 x 10(-8); multiplicative per-allele odds ratio 1.20; 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.28). This SNP maps to the first intron of the ABO blood group gene. Our results are consistent with earlier epidemiologic evidence suggesting that people with blood group O may have a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than those with groups A or B.
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Identification of a new prostate cancer susceptibility locus on chromosome 8q24.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2009
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We report a genome-wide association study in 10,286 cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. We identify a new association with prostate cancer risk on chromosome 8q24 (rs620861, P = 1.3 x 10(-10), heterozygote OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.24; homozygote OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45). This defines a new locus associated with prostate cancer susceptibility on 8q24.
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Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3).
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2009
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Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3).
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Beyond odds ratios--communicating disease risk based on genetic profiles.
Nat. Rev. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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The brisk discovery of novel inherited disease markers by genome-wide association (GWA) studies has raised expectations for predicting disease risk by analysing multiple common alleles. However, the statistics used during the discovery phase of research (such as odds ratios or p values for association) are not the most appropriate measures for evaluating the predictive value of genetic profiles. We argue that other measures--such as sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values--are more useful when proposing a genetic profile for risk prediction.
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A two-stage genome-wide association study of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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The cause of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is largely unknown, but genetic factors are thought to play a significant role in determining susceptibility to motor neuron degeneration. To identify genetic variants altering risk of ALS, we undertook a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS): we followed our initial GWAS of 545 066 SNPs in 553 individuals with ALS and 2338 controls by testing the 7600 most associated SNPs from the first stage in three independent cohorts consisting of 2160 cases and 3008 controls. None of the SNPs selected for replication exceeded the Bonferroni threshold for significance. The two most significantly associated SNPs, rs2708909 and rs2708851 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17 and 1.18, and P-values = 6.98 x 10(-7) and 1.16 x 10(-6)], were located on chromosome 7p13.3 within a 175 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing the SUNC1, HUS1 and C7orf57 genes. These associations did not achieve genome-wide significance in the original cohort and failed to replicate in an additional independent cohort of 989 US cases and 327 controls (OR = 1.18 and 1.19, P-values = 0.08 and 0.06, respectively). Thus, we chose to cautiously interpret our data as hypothesis-generating requiring additional confirmation, especially as all previously reported loci for ALS have failed to replicate successfully. Indeed, the three loci (FGGY, ITPR2 and DPP6) identified in previous GWAS of sporadic ALS were not significantly associated with disease in our study. Our findings suggest that ALS is more genetically and clinically heterogeneous than previously recognized. Genotype data from our study have been made available online to facilitate such future endeavors.
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Newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility loci on 3p24 and 17q23.2.
Shahana Ahmed, Gilles Thomas, Maya Ghoussaini, Catherine S Healey, Manjeet K Humphreys, Radka Platte, Jonathan Morrison, Melanie Maranian, Karen A Pooley, Robert Luben, Diana Eccles, D Gareth Evans, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Julian Peto, Michael R Stratton, Nazneen Rahman, Kevin Jacobs, Ross Prentice, Garnet L Anderson, Aleksandar Rajkovic, J David Curb, Regina G Ziegler, Christine D Berg, Saundra S Buys, Catherine A McCarty, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Eugenia E Calle, Michael J Thun, W Ryan Diver, Stig Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Thilo Dörk, Peter Schürmann, Peter Hillemanns, Johann H Karstens, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Iosif V Zalutsky, Marina Bermisheva, Sardana Fedorova, Elza Khusnutdinova, , Daehee Kang, Keun-Young Yoo, Dong Young Noh, Sei-Hyun Ahn, Peter Devilee, Christi J van Asperen, R A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jolanta Lissowska, Louise Brinton, Beata Peplonska, Heli Nevanlinna, Tuomas Heikkinen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, John L Hopper, Melissa C Southey, Letitia Smith, Amanda B Spurdle, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Richard R van Hien, Sten Cornelissen, Roger L Milne, Gloria Ribas, Anna González-Neira, Javier Benitez, Rita K Schmutzler, Barbara Burwinkel, Claus R Bartram, Alfons Meindl, Hiltrud Brauch, Christina Justenhoven, Ute Hamann, Jenny Chang-Claude, Rebecca Hein, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Veli-Matti Kosma, Vesa Kataja, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Zachary Fredericksen, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Dallas R English, Susan E Hankinson, David G Cox, Peter Kraft, Lars J Vatten, Kristian Hveem, Merethe Kumle, Alice Sigurdson, Michele Doody, Parveen Bhatti, Bruce H Alexander, Maartje J Hooning, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Rogier A Oldenburg, Mieke Schutte, Per Hall, Kamila Czene, Jianjun Liu, Yuqing Li, Angela Cox, Graeme Elliott, Ian Brock, Malcolm W R Reed, Chen-Yang Shen, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Giu-Cheng Hsu, Shou-Tung Chen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Jonathan Beesley, Ellen L Goode, Fergus Couch, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Robert N Hoover, Bruce A J Ponder, David J Hunter, Paul D P Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Stephen J Chanock, Douglas F Easton.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2009
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, but these explain only a small fraction of the familial risk of the disease. Five of these loci were identified through a two-stage GWAS involving 390 familial cases and 364 controls in the first stage, and 3,990 cases and 3,916 controls in the second stage. To identify additional loci, we tested over 800 promising associations from this GWAS in a further two stages involving 37,012 cases and 40,069 controls from 33 studies in the CGEMS collaboration and Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We found strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08-1.13, P = 4.1 x 10(-23)) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92-0.97, P = 1.4 x 10(-8)). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q.
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A multistage genome-wide association study in breast cancer identifies two new risk alleles at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1).
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2009
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We conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of breast cancer in 9,770 cases and 10,799 controls in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. In stage 1, we genotyped 528,173 SNPs in 1,145 cases of invasive breast cancer and 1,142 controls. In stage 2, we analyzed 24,909 top SNPs in 4,547 cases and 4,434 controls. In stage 3, we investigated 21 loci in 4,078 cases and 5,223 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide significance. A pericentromeric SNP on chromosome 1p11.2 (rs11249433; P = 6.74 x 10(-10) adjusted genotype test, 2 degrees of freedom) resides in a large linkage disequilibrium block neighboring NOTCH2 and FCGR1B; this signal was stronger for estrogen-receptor-positive tumors. A second SNP on chromosome 14q24.1 (rs999737; P = 1.74 x 10(-7)) localizes to RAD51L1, a gene in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. We also confirmed associations with loci on chromosomes 2q35, 5p12, 5q11.2, 8q24, 10q26 and 16q12.1.
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Polymorphisms in innate immunity genes and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China.
Environ. Mol. Mutagen.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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The high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei County, China has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The inflammatory response induced by coal smoke components may promote lung tumor development. We studied the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in innate immunity and lung cancer risk in a population-based case-control study (122 cases and 122 controls) in Xuanwei. A total of 1,360 tag SNPs in 149 gene regions were included in the analysis. FCER2 rs7249320 was the most significant SNP (OR: 0.30; 95% CI: 0.16-0.55; P: 0.0001; false discovery rate value, 0.13) for variant carriers. The gene regions ALOX12B/ALOX15B and KLK2 were associated with increased lung cancer risk globally (false discovery rate value <0.15). In addition, there were positive interactions between KLK15 rs3745523 and smoky coal use (OR: 9.40; P-interaction = 0.07) and between FCER2 rs7249320 and KLK2 rs2739476 (OR: 10.77; P-interaction = 0.003). Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in innate immunity genes may play a role in the genesis of lung cancer caused by PAH-containing coal smoke. Integrin/receptor and complement pathways as well as IgE regulation are particularly noteworthy.
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Genetic background comparison using distance-based regression, with applications in population stratification evaluation and adjustment.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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Population stratification (PS) can lead to an inflated rate of false-positive findings in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The commonly used approach of adjustment for a fixed number of principal components (PCs) could have a deleterious impact on power when selected PCs are equally distributed in cases and controls, or the adjustment of certain covariates, such as self-identified ethnicity or recruitment center, already included in the association analyses, correctly maps to major axes of genetic heterogeneity. We propose a computationally efficient procedure, PC-Finder, to identify a minimal set of PCs while permitting an effective correction for PS. A general pseudo F statistic, derived from a non-parametric multivariate regression model, can be used to assess whether PS exists or has been adequately corrected by a set of selected PCs. Empirical data from two GWAS conducted as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project demonstrate the application of the procedure. Furthermore, simulation studies show the power advantage of the proposed procedure in GWAS over currently used PS correction strategies, particularly when the PCs with substantial genetic variation are distributed similarly in cases and controls and therefore do not induce PS.
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Age-Dependent Cancer Risk Is Not Different in between MSH2 and MLH1 Mutation Carriers.
J Cancer Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2009
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Lynch syndrome is mostly characterized by early-onset colorectal and endometrial adenocarcinomas. Over 90% of the causal mutations occur in two mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the age-dependent cancer risk in MSH2 or MLH1 mutation carriers from data of DNA diagnostic laboratories. To avoid overestimation, evaluation was based on the age-dependent proportion of mutation carriers in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of identified mutation carriers. Data from 859 such eligible relatives were collected from 8 centers; 387 were found to have inherited the mutation from their relatives. Age-dependent risks were calculated either using a nonparametric approach for four discrete age groups or assuming a modified Weibull distribution for the dependence of risk on age. Cancer risk was estimated starting at 28 (25-32 0.68 confidence interval) and to reach near 0.70 at 70 years. The risks were very similar for MSH2 and MLH1 mutation carriers. Although not statistically significant, the risk in males appeared to precede that for females by ten years. This difference needs to be investigated on a larger dataset. If confirmed, this would indicate that the onset of the colonoscopic surveillance may be different in male and female mutation carriers.
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Genotype/phenotype analyses for 53 Crohns disease associated genetic polymorphisms.
PLoS ONE
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Recent studies reported a role for more than 70 genes or loci in the susceptibility to Crohns disease (CD). However, the impact of these associations in clinical practice remains to be defined. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes for the main 53 CD-associated polymorphisms.
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The landscape of cancer genes and mutational processes in breast cancer.
Nature
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All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis, and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast cancer have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here we examine the genomes of 100 tumours for somatic copy number changes and mutations in the coding exons of protein-coding genes. The number of somatic mutations varied markedly between individual tumours. We found strong correlations between mutation number, age at which cancer was diagnosed and cancer histological grade, and observed multiple mutational signatures, including one present in about ten per cent of tumours characterized by numerous mutations of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. Driver mutations were identified in several new cancer genes including AKT2, ARID1B, CASP8, CDKN1B, MAP3K1, MAP3K13, NCOR1, SMARCD1 and TBX3. Among the 100 tumours, we found driver mutations in at least 40 cancer genes and 73 different combinations of mutated cancer genes. The results highlight the substantial genetic diversity underlying this common disease.
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8q24 Cancer risk allele associated with major metastatic risk in inflammatory breast cancer.
PLoS ONE
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Association studies have identified low penetrance alleles that participate to the risk of cancer development. The 8q24 chromosomal region contains several such loci involved in various cancers that have been recently studied for their propensity to influence the clinical outcome of prostate cancer. We investigated here two 8q24 breast and colon cancer risk alleles in the close vicinity of the MYC gene for their role in the occurrence of distant metastases.
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Mutational processes molding the genomes of 21 breast cancers.
Cell
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All cancers carry somatic mutations. The patterns of mutation in cancer genomes reflect the DNA damage and repair processes to which cancer cells and their precursors have been exposed. To explore these mechanisms further, we generated catalogs of somatic mutation from 21 breast cancers and applied mathematical methods to extract mutational signatures of the underlying processes. Multiple distinct single- and double-nucleotide substitution signatures were discernible. Cancers with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations exhibited a characteristic combination of substitution mutation signatures and a distinctive profile of deletions. Complex relationships between somatic mutation prevalence and transcription were detected. A remarkable phenomenon of localized hypermutation, termed "kataegis," was observed. Regions of kataegis differed between cancers but usually colocalized with somatic rearrangements. Base substitutions in these regions were almost exclusively of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. The mechanisms underlying most of these mutational signatures are unknown. However, a role for the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases is proposed.
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The life history of 21 breast cancers.
Cell
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Cancer evolves dynamically as clonal expansions supersede one another driven by shifting selective pressures, mutational processes, and disrupted cancer genes. These processes mark the genome, such that a cancers life history is encrypted in the somatic mutations present. We developed algorithms to decipher this narrative and applied them to 21 breast cancers. Mutational processes evolve across a cancers lifespan, with many emerging late but contributing extensive genetic variation. Subclonal diversification is prominent, and most mutations are found in just a fraction of tumor cells. Every tumor has a dominant subclonal lineage, representing more than 50% of tumor cells. Minimal expansion of these subclones occurs until many hundreds to thousands of mutations have accumulated, implying the existence of long-lived, quiescent cell lineages capable of substantial proliferation upon acquisition of enabling genomic changes. Expansion of the dominant subclone to an appreciable mass may therefore represent the final rate-limiting step in a breast cancers development, triggering diagnosis.
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Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer.
Kevin B Jacobs, Meredith Yeager, Weiyin Zhou, Sholom Wacholder, Zhaoming Wang, Benjamín Rodríguez-Santiago, Amy Hutchinson, Xiang Deng, Chenwei Liu, Marie-Josèphe Horner, Michael Cullen, Caroline G Epstein, Laurie Burdett, Michael C Dean, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Joshua Sampson, Charles C Chung, Joseph Kovaks, Susan M Gapstur, Victoria L Stevens, Lauren T Teras, Mia M Gaudet, Demetrius Albanes, Stephanie J Weinstein, Jarmo Virtamo, Philip R Taylor, Neal D Freedman, Christian C Abnet, Alisa M Goldstein, Nan Hu, Kai Yu, Jian-Min Yuan, Linda Liao, Ti Ding, You-Lin Qiao, Yu-Tang Gao, Woon-Puay Koh, Yong-Bing Xiang, Ze-Zhong Tang, Jin-Hu Fan, Melinda C Aldrich, Christopher Amos, William J Blot, Cathryn H Bock, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Curtis C Harris, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Laurence N Kolonel, Loic Le Marchand, Lorna H McNeill, Benjamin A Rybicki, Ann G Schwartz, Lisa B Signorello, Margaret R Spitz, John K Wiencke, Margaret Wrensch, Xifeng Wu, Krista A Zanetti, Regina G Ziegler, Jonine D Figueroa, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Nuria Malats, Gaëlle Marenne, Ludmila Prokunina-Olsson, Dalsu Baris, Molly Schwenn, Alison Johnson, Maria Teresa Landi, Lynn Goldin, Dario Consonni, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Melissa Rotunno, Preetha Rajaraman, Ulrika Andersson, Laura E Beane Freeman, Christine D Berg, Julie E Buring, Mary A Butler, Tania Carreon, Maria Feychting, Anders Ahlbom, J Michael Gaziano, Graham G Giles, Göran Hallmans, Susan E Hankinson, Patricia Hartge, Roger Henriksson, Peter D Inskip, Christoffer Johansen, Annelie Landgren, Roberta Mckean-Cowdin, Dominique S Michaud, Beatrice S Melin, Ulrike Peters, Avima M Ruder, Howard D Sesso, Gianluca Severi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Kala Visvanathan, Emily White, Alicja Wolk, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Wei Zheng, Debra T Silverman, Manolis Kogevinas, Juan R Gonzalez, Olaya Villa, Donghui Li, Eric J Duell, Harvey A Risch, Sara H Olson, Charles Kooperberg, Brian M Wolpin, Li Jiao, Manal Hassan, William Wheeler, Alan A Arslan, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Charles S Fuchs, Steven Gallinger, Myron D Gross, Elizabeth A Holly, Alison P Klein, Andrea LaCroix, Margaret T Mandelson, Gloria Petersen, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Paige M Bracci, Federico Canzian, Kenneth Chang, Michelle Cotterchio, Edward L Giovannucci, Michael Goggins, Judith A Hoffman Bolton, Mazda Jenab, Kay-Tee Khaw, Vittorio Krogh, Robert C Kurtz, Robert R McWilliams, Julie B Mendelsohn, Kari G Rabe, Elio Riboli, Anne Tjønneland, Geoffrey S Tobias, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Joanne W Elena, Herbert Yu, Laufey Amundadottir, Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon, Peter Kraft, Fredrick Schumacher, Daniel Stram, Sharon A Savage, Lisa Mirabello, Irene L Andrulis, Jay S Wunder, Ana Patiño García, Luis Sierrasesúmaga, Donald A Barkauskas, Richard G Gorlick, Mark Purdue, Wong-Ho Chow, Lee E Moore, Kendra L Schwartz, Faith G Davis, Ann W Hsing, Sonja I Berndt, Amanda Black, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Beata Peplonska, Katherine A McGlynn, Michael B Cook, Barry I Graubard, Christian P Kratz, Mark H Greene, Ralph L Erickson, David J Hunter, Gilles Thomas, Robert N Hoover, Francisco X Real, Joseph F Fraumeni, Neil E Caporaso, Margaret Tucker, Nathaniel Rothman, Luis A Pérez-Jurado, Stephen J Chanock.
Nat. Genet.
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In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls from 13 genome-wide association studies, we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones in DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. We observed mosaic abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of >2 Mb in size in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%), with abnormal cell proportions of between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, frequency increased with age, from 0.23% under 50 years to 1.91% between 75 and 79 years (P = 4.8 × 10(-8)). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals; odds ratio (OR) = 1.25; P = 0.016), with stronger association with cases who had DNA collected before diagnosis or treatment (OR = 1.45; P = 0.0005). Detectable mosaicism was also more common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least 1 year before diagnosis with leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR = 35.4; P = 3.8 × 10(-11)). These findings underscore the time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and potentially other late-onset diseases.
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Common variants near TARDBP and EGR2 are associated with susceptibility to Ewing sarcoma.
Nat. Genet.
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Ewing sarcoma, a pediatric tumor characterized by EWSR1-ETS fusions, is predominantly observed in populations of European ancestry. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 401 French individuals with Ewing sarcoma, 684 unaffected French individuals and 3,668 unaffected individuals of European descent and living in the United States. We identified candidate risk loci at 1p36.22, 10q21 and 15q15. We replicated these loci in two independent sets of cases and controls. Joint analysis identified associations with rs9430161 (P = 1.4 × 10(-20); odds ratio (OR) = 2.2) located 25 kb upstream of TARDBP, rs224278 (P = 4.0 × 10(-17); OR = 1.7) located 5 kb upstream of EGR2 and, to a lesser extent, rs4924410 at 15q15 (P = 6.6 × 10(-9); OR = 1.5). The major risk haplotypes were less prevalent in Africans, suggesting that these loci could contribute to geographical differences in Ewing sarcoma incidence. TARDBP shares structural similarities with EWSR1 and FUS, which encode RNA binding proteins, and EGR2 is a target gene of EWSR1-ETS. Variants at these loci were associated with expression levels of TARDBP, ADO (encoding cysteamine dioxygenase) and EGR2.
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Y chromosome haplogroups and prostate cancer in populations of European and Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.
Hum. Genet.
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Genetic variation on the Y chromosome has not been convincingly implicated in prostate cancer risk. To comprehensively analyze the role of inherited Y chromosome variation in prostate cancer risk in individuals of European ancestry, we genotyped 34 binary Y chromosome markers in 3,995 prostate cancer cases and 3,815 control subjects drawn from four studies. In this set, we identified nominally significant association between a rare haplogroup, E1b1b1c, and prostate cancer in stage I (P = 0.012, OR = 0.51; 95% confidence interval 0.30-0.87). Population substructure of E1b1b1c carriers suggested Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, prompting a replication phase in individuals of both European and Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. The association was not significant for prostate cancer overall in studies of either Ashkenazi Jewish (1,686 cases and 1,597 control subjects) or European (686 cases and 734 control subjects) ancestry (P(meta) = 0.078), but a meta-analysis of stage I and II studies revealed a nominally significant association with prostate cancer risk (P(meta) = 0.010, OR = 0.77; 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.94). Comparing haplogroup frequencies between studies, we noted strong similarities between those conducted in the US and France, in which the majority of men carried R1 haplogroups, resembling Northwestern European populations. On the other hand, Finns had a remarkably different haplogroup distribution with a preponderance of N1c and I1 haplogroups. In summary, our results suggest that inherited Y chromosome variation plays a limited role in prostate cancer etiology in European populations but warrant follow-up in additional large and well characterized studies of multiple ethnic backgrounds.
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