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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
AIDS-related mycoses: the way forward.
Trends Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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The contribution of fungal infections to the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected individuals is largely unrecognized. A recent meeting highlighted several priorities that need to be urgently addressed, including improved epidemiological surveillance, increased availability of existing diagnostics and drugs, more training in the field of medical mycology, and better funding for research and provision of treatment, particularly in developing countries.
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CD4+ T lymphocyte reference values of immunocompetent subjects in an African university.
Trop Doct
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2011
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CD4(+) T cells play critical roles in the immune system and, being primary targets of HIV infection, they are used to measure disease progression and response to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), alongside other parameters, in HIV/AIDS patients. The aim of this study was to determine the reference values of CD4(+) T cells in a student population that was HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) negative. After ethical clearance and informed consent, 500 subjects (mean age = 26 years) were recruited, of whom 56 (11.2%) had HIV, HBV or HCV and were excluded. Blood samples were collected from the remaining 444 subjects into vacutainer tubes and analysed using the BD FACScount cytometer according to the manufacturers instructions. Of the 444 subjects, 266 (59.9%) were male and 178 (40.1%) were female. The mean (± standard deviation) CD4(+) T cell count was 987 cells/µL (± 336). The mean counts among males and females were 957 cells/µL (± 306) and 991 cells/µL (± 340), respectively. Values of CD4(+) T cells ranged from 651 cells/µL to 1705 cells/µL. Subjects with higher CD4(+) T Cells were more likely to be female than male. There was no direct correlation between CD4(+) T cell values and age of the participants. Our findings offer the first insight into the CD4(+) T cell reference values of a Nigerian student population and provide useful data that will guide future cART decisions and other immune-based therapies.
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Urban-rural estimation of hepatitis C virus infection sero-prevalence in north Central Nigeria.
East Afr J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2010
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The epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been partially described for at risk groups in urban communities in Nigeria. On the other hand, literature on the possible spread of the virus in rural Nigeria remains extremely scanty. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV in a rural and urban community in Nigeria.
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Sero-prevalence of HIV infection among tuberculosis patients in a rural tuberculosis referral clinic in northern Nigeria.
Pan Afr Med J
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2010
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Co-infection with Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis the causative agent of Tuberculosis (TB), has been referred to as the "cursed duet" as a result of the attendant morbidity and mortality due to their synergistic actions. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of HIV infection among Tuberculosis (TB) confirmed patients on admission at a TB referral centre. The association of HIV prevalence with gender and age as risk factors was also determined. Blood samples were collected by venipuncture from 257 TB patients and their HIV status determined. Viral antibody detection was carried out using ELISA kits which detected both HIV-1 and HIV-2 and confirmed by Western blot. Of the 257 patients screened, 44.20% (106) were HIV positive. The prevalence of co-infection was higher among the female (44.82%) than the male (38.30%) patients and highest among those aged 21-40 years old (45.30%). Co-infection was found to be statistically highly associated with gender and age (p<0.05). A very high prevalence of HIV infection was reported in this study among patients that were on admission on the grounds that they had only TB. It is therefore important to screen for HIV among all TB patients.
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Evaluation of a recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine in a vaccinated Nigerian population.
J Infect Dev Ctries
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2010
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Recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was introduced in 1986 and has gradually replaced the plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. No published data are available on the immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccines in Nigerians. The current study aimed to evaluate protective sero-conversion rates after vaccination with Shanvac-B rDNA hepatitis B vaccine in Nigerian subjects between January and September 2009.
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Serological markers and risk factors for hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses among students in a Nigerian university.
East Afr J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2009
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The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the seroprevalence rates of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections and to analyze associated risk factors among 400 students in a Nigerian.
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Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Keffi and its environs.
Indian J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2009
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Coinfection with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to be a lethal combination especially with its attendant mortality and morbidity. The need to have a baseline data in an environment like Keffi with a HIV/AIDS prevalence of 38.6% necessitated this study. Three hundred and ninety people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) were screened for pulmonary tuberculosis. Results of this study showed 16.7% prevalence of coinfection in the population. Gender-related prevalence of coinfection was 19.4% and 14.4% among males and females respectively (P>0.05). Age-related prevalence of coinfection was least among respondents of age below 20 years (13.3%) and highest among those of age above 40 years (20.2%) (P>0.05). Even though statistically insignificant by both parameters, these findings are of public health significance. There is therefore an urgent need for immediate intervention to allow for early TB diagnosis, institution of anti-TB treatment and provision of prophylaxis against TB among TB-negative PLWHA.
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Serologic survey of specific rubella virus IgM in the sera of pregnant women in Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.
Afr J Reprod Health
PUBLISHED: 06-01-2009
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Although a major section of pregnant women in Nigeria are immune to rubella infection, cases of congenital rubella syndrome are still been seen in hospitals. Rubella is not a reportable disease in Nigeria and data of its epidemiology are extremely rare. In this study, we estimate the burden of acute rubella virus infection among pregnant women during their first trimester in Makurdi-Benue State-Nigeria. Anti-rubella IgM were detected using a commercially available quantitative enzyme immunoassay. Of the 534 (mean age = 28.1 +/- 1.7 years) sera sample tested, 21 (3.9%; 95% CI = +/- 1.64%) were positive for Rubella IgM antibodies. We also extrapolated by mathematical modeling that 4.2% represents the actual/real susceptible population in Nigeria. There was no significant correlations between rubella infection and age (p > 0.05). Although the incidence of rubella is low we suggest the antenatal screening and vaccination of all females of child bearing age to eliminate this potentially devastating virus in the county.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.