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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Optical fiber-based system for continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity.
Rev Sci Instrum
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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This paper reports the design of an optical fiber-based velocity measurement system and its application in measuring the in-bore projectile velocity. The measurement principle of the implemented system is based on Doppler effect and heterodyne detection technique. The analysis of the velocity measurement principle deduces the relationship between the projectile velocity and the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the optical fiber-based system output signal. To extract the IF of the fast-changing signal carrying the velocity information, an IF extraction algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transforms is detailed. Besides, the performance of the algorithm is analyzed by performing corresponding simulation. At last, an in-bore projectile velocity measurement experiment with a sniper rifle having a 720 m/s muzzle velocity is performed to verify the feasibility of the optical fiber-based velocity measurement system. Experiment results show that the measured muzzle velocity is 718.61 m/s, and the relative uncertainty of the measured muzzle velocity is approximately 0.021%.
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IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies against the novel polyprotein in active tuberculosis.
BMC Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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The present study was aimed to evaluate whether IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies levels detected against a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis polyprotein 38 F-64 F (with 38 F being the abbreviation for 38kD-ESAT6-CFP10 and 64 F for Mtb8.4-MPT64-TB16.3-Mtb8) are suitable for diagnosing active tuberculosis, and for monitoring the efficacy of chemotherapy on TB patients.
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Stromal-epithelial cell interactions and alteration of branching morphogenesis in macromastic mammary glands.
J. Cell. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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True macromastia is a rare but disabling condition characterized by massive breast growth. The aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms for this disorder remain largely unexplored because of the lack of in vivo or in vitro models. Previous studies suggested that regulation of epithelial cell growth and development by oestrogen was dependent on paracrine growth factors from the stroma. In this study, a co-culture model containing epithelial and stromal cells was used to investigate the interactions of these cells in macromastia. Epithelial cell proliferation and branching morphogenesis were measured to assess the effect of macromastic stromal cells on epithelial cells. We analysed the cytokines secreted by stromal cells and identified molecules that were critical for effects on epithelial cells. Our results indicated a significant increase in cell proliferation and branching morphogenesis of macromastic and non-macromastic epithelial cells when co-cultured with macromastic stromal cells or in conditioned medium from macromastic stromal cells. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a key factor in epithelial-stromal interactions of macromastia-derived cell cultures. Blockade of HGF with neutralizing antibodies dramatically attenuated epithelial cell proliferation in conditioned medium from macromastic stromal cells. The epithelial-stromal cell co-culture model demonstrated reliability for studying interactions of mammary stromal and epithelial cells in macromastia. In this model, HGF secreted by macromastic stromal cells was found to play an important role in modifying the behaviour of co-cultured epithelial cells. This model allows further studies to investigate basic cellular and molecular mechanisms in tissue from patients with true breast hypertrophy.
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Transcriptional regulation prediction of antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer based on RNA polymerase II binding data.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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Although endocrine therapy impedes estrogen-ER signaling pathway and thus reduces breast cancer mortality, patients remain at continued risk of relapse after tamoxifen or other endocrine therapies. Understanding the mechanisms of endocrine resistance, particularly the role of transcriptional regulation is very important and necessary.
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Calculating the burden of disease of avian-origin H7N9 infections in China.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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A total of 131 cases of avian-originated H7N9 infection have been confirmed in China mainland from February 2013 to May 2013. We calculated the overall burden of H7N9 cases in China as of 31 May 2013 to provide an example of comprehensive burden of disease in the 21st century from an acute animal-borne emerging infectious disease.
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Large-scale HIV testing in older population in China: findings from a cross-sectional study.
Int J STD AIDS
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2013
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Aiming to explore universal HIV testing, and to understand exact HIV prevalence in older general population, we conducted a community-based cross-sectional epidemiological investigation in two counties of Zhejiang province. Using census strategy and convenience sampling method, those participants who were older than 50 years and meet certain eligibility were enrolled, and HIV prevalence was presented by crude infection rate. A total of 215,441 (64.82%) were enrolled into this study, HIV testing was added into their health exam plan and 18 were confirmed as HIV infection, with a crude rate of 0.84/10,000. HIV prevalence was higher among men than among women in all age groups (p?
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Scriptaid, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, protects against traumatic brain injury via modulation of PTEN and AKT pathway : scriptaid protects against TBI via AKT.
Neurotherapeutics
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of motor and cognitive deficits in young adults for which there is no effective therapy. The present study characterizes the protective effect of a new histone deacetylase inhibitor, Scriptaid (Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, St. Louis, MO), against injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Scriptaid elicited a dose-dependent decrease in lesion size at 1.5 to 5.5 mg/kg and a concomitant attenuation in motor and cognitive deficits when delivered 30 minutes postinjury in a model of moderate TBI. Comparable protection was achieved even when treatment was delayed to 12 h postinjury. Furthermore, the protection of motor and cognitive functions was long lasting, as similar improvements were detected 35 days postinjury. The efficacy of Scriptaid (Sigma-Aldrich Corporation) was manifested as an increase in surviving neurons, as well as the number/length of their processes within the CA3 region of the hippocampus and the pericontusional cortex. Consistent with other histone deacetylase inhibitors, Scriptaid treatment prevented the decrease in phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and phosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (p-PTEN) induced by TBI in cortical and CA3 hippocampal neurons. Notably, the p-AKT inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the impact of Scriptaid, providing mechanistic evidence that Scriptaid functions partly by modulating the prosurvival AKT signaling pathway. As Scriptaid offers long-lasting neuronal and behavioral protection, even when delivered 12 h after controlled cortical impact, it is an excellent new candidate for the effective clinical treatment of TBI.
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Systematic correlation between spine plasticity and the anxiety/depression-like phenotype induced by corticosterone in mice.
Neuroreport
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2013
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Unraveling the pathophysiological basis for the development of and recovery from depression is a unique challenge. Dendritic plasticity has been reported to be involved in the development of depression. We modeled an anxiety/depression-like phenotype by chronic corticosterone exposure in mice and reversed this anxiety/depression-like phenotype by long-term treatment with fluoxetine (FLX). Spine density in the hippocampus was detected by Golgi-Cox staining at five time points. The data showed that 35 days of corticosterone exposure led to a decrease in spine density in CA1, concomitant with the onset of depression. Following 25 days of treatment with FLX, the decrease in both the dendritic spine density in the hippocampus and the anxiety/depression-like phenotype induced by chronic corticosterone recovered to normal levels concomitantly. Interestingly, the total spine density changes are all mainly driven by changes in thin and stubby spines, not mushroom spines, following chronic corticosterone or FLX treatment. Our results suggest that the changes in dendritic spine density in the hippocampus may be one of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of and recovery from depression, and the neuronal plasticity of CA1 is first impaired during the development of depression.
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Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation improves neurologic recovery and attenuates white matter injury after experimental traumatic brain injury.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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Dietary supplementation with omega-3 (?-3) fatty acids is a safe, economical mean of preventive medicine that has shown protection against several neurologic disorders. The present study tested the hypothesis that this method is protective against controlled cortical impact (CCI). Indeed, mice fed with ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched diet for 2 months exhibited attenuated short and long-term behavioral deficits due to CCI. Although ?-3 PUFAs did not decrease cortical lesion volume, these fatty acids did protect against hippocampal neuronal loss after CCI and reduced pro-inflammatory response. Interestingly, ?-3 PUFAs prevented the loss of myelin basic protein (MPB), preserved the integrity of the myelin sheath, and maintained the nerve fiber conductivity in the CCI model. ?-3 PUFAs also directly protected oligodendrocyte cultures from excitotoxicity and blunted the microglial activation-induced death of oligodendrocytes in microglia/oligodendrocyte cocultures. In sum, ?-3 PUFAs elicit multifaceted protection against behavioral dysfunction, hippocampal neuronal loss, inflammation, and loss of myelination and impulse conductivity. The present report is the first demonstration that ?-3 PUFAs protect against white matter injury in vivo and in vitro. The protective impact of ?-3 PUFAs supports the clinical use of this dietary supplement as a prophylaxis against traumatic brain injury and other nervous system disorders.
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Microglia/macrophage polarization dynamics in white matter after traumatic brain injury.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
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Mononuclear phagocytes are a population of multi-phenotypic cells and have dual roles in brain destruction/reconstruction. The phenotype-specific roles of microglia/macrophages in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are, however, poorly characterized. In the present study, TBI was induced in mice by a controlled cortical impact (CCI) and animals were killed at 1 to 14 days post injury. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence staining for M1 and M2 markers were performed to characterize phenotypic changes of microglia/macrophages in both gray and white matter. We found that the number of M1-like phagocytes increased in cortex, striatum and corpus callosum (CC) during the first week and remained elevated until at least 14 days after TBI. In contrast, M2-like microglia/macrophages peaked at 5 days, but decreased rapidly thereafter. Notably, the severity of white matter injury (WMI), manifested by immunohistochemical staining for neurofilament SMI-32, was strongly correlated with the number of M1-like phagocytes. In vitro experiments using a conditioned medium transfer system confirmed that M1 microglia-conditioned media exacerbated oxygen glucose deprivation-induced oligodendrocyte death. Our results indicate that microglia/macrophages respond dynamically to TBI, experiencing a transient M2 phenotype followed by a shift to the M1 phenotype. The M1 phenotypic shift may propel WMI progression and represents a rational target for TBI treatment.
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GM-CSF contributes to aortic aneurysms resulting from SMAD3 deficiency.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Heterozygous loss-of-function SMAD3 (Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3) mutations lead to aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS). In the present study, we found that mice lacking Smad3 had a vascular phenotype similar to AOS, marked by the progressive development of aneurysms. These aneurysms were associated with various pathological changes in transmural inflammatory cell infiltration. Bone marrow transplants from Smad3-/- mice induced aortitis and aortic root dilation in irradiated WT recipient mice. Transplantation of CD4+ T cells from Smad3-/- mice also induced aortitis in Smad3+/+ recipient mice, while depletion of CD4+ T cells in Smad3-/- mice reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the aortic root. Furthermore, IFN-? deficiency increased, while IL-17 deficiency decreased, disease severity in Smad3+/- mice. Cytokine secretion was measured using a cytokine quantibody array, and Smad3-/- CD4+ T cells secreted more GM-CSF than Smad3+/+ CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF induced CD11b+Gr-1+Ly-6Chi inflammatory monocyte accumulation in the aortic root, but administration of anti-GM-CSF mAb to Smad3-/- mice resulted in significantly less inflammation and dilation in the aortic root. We also identified a missense mutation (c.985A>G) in a family of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Intense inflammatory infiltration and GM-CSF expression was observed in aortas specimens of these patients, suggesting that GM-CSF is potentially involved in the development of AOS.
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A dynamic dual role of IL-2 signaling in the two-step differentiation process of adaptive regulatory T cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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The molecular mechanism of the extrathymic generation of adaptive, or inducible, CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (iTregs) remains incompletely defined. We show that exposure of splenic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) cells to IL-2, but not other common ?-chain cytokines, resulted in Stat5 phosphorylation and induced Foxp3 expression in ?10% of the cells. Thus, IL-2/Stat5 signaling may be critical for Foxp3 induction in peripheral CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) iTreg precursors. In this study, to further define the role of IL-2 in the formation of iTreg precursors as well as their subsequent Foxp3 expression, we designed a two-step iTreg differentiation model. During the initial "conditioning" step, CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) naive T cells were activated by TCR stimulation. Inhibition of IL-2 signaling via Jak3-Stat5 was required during this step to generate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) cells containing iTreg precursors. During the subsequent Foxp3-induction step driven by cytokines, IL-2 was the most potent cytokine to induce Foxp3 expression in these iTreg precursors. This two-step method generated a large number of iTregs with relatively stable expression of Foxp3, which were able to prevent CD4(+)CD45RB(high) cell-mediated colitis in Rag1(-/-) mice. In consideration of this information, whereas initial inhibition of IL-2 signaling upon T cell priming generates iTreg precursors, subsequent activation of IL-2 signaling in these precursors induces the expression of Foxp3. These findings advance the understanding of iTreg differentiation and may facilitate the therapeutic use of iTregs in immune disorders.
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Potential roles of microRNAs in regulating long intergenic noncoding RNAs.
BMC Med Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Over 10,000 long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) have been identified in the human genome. Some have been well characterized and known to participate in various stages of gene regulation. In the post-transcriptional process, another class of well-known small non-coding RNA, or microRNA (miRNA), is very active in inhibiting mRNA. Though similar features between mRNA and lincRNA have been revealed in several recent studies, and a few isolated miRNA-lincRNA relationships have been observed. Despite these advances, the comprehensive miRNA regulation pattern of lincRNA has not been clarified.
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Identification of regulatory regions of bidirectional genes in cervical cancer.
BMC Med Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Bidirectional promoters are shared promoter sequences between divergent gene pair (genes proximal to each other on opposite strands), and can regulate the genes in both directions. In the human genome, > 10% of protein-coding genes are arranged head-to-head on opposite strands, with transcription start sites that are separated by < 1,000 base pairs. Many transcription factor binding sites occur in the bidirectional promoters that influence the expression of 2 opposite genes. Recently, RNA polymerase II (RPol II) ChIP-seq data are used to identify the promoters of coding genes and non-coding RNAs. However, a bidirectional promoter with RPol II ChIP-Seq data has not been found.
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Tetramethylpyrazine prevents contrast-induced nephropathy by inhibiting p38 MAPK and FoxO1 signaling pathways.
Am. J. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Apoptosis is recognized as an important mechanism in contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). As tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) has been recently found to be renoprotective and anti-apoptotic in multiple kidney injuries, we hypothesized that TMP would prevent CIN.
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SIDD: A Semantically Integrated Database towards a Global View of Human Disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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A number of databases have been developed to collect disease-related molecular, phenotypic and environmental features (DR-MPEs), such as genes, non-coding RNAs, genetic variations, drugs, phenotypes and environmental factors. However, each of current databases focused on only one or two DR-MPEs. There is an urgent demand to develop an integrated database, which can establish semantic associations among disease-related databases and link them to provide a global view of human disease at the biological level. This database, once developed, will facilitate researchers to query various DR-MPEs through disease, and investigate disease mechanisms from different types of data.
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Modeling exon expression using histone modifications.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Histones undergo numerous covalent modifications that play important roles in regulating gene expression. Previous investigations have focused on the effects of histone modifications on gene promoters, whereas efforts to unravel their effects on transcribed regions have lagged behind. To elucidate the effects of histone modification on transcribed regions, we constructed a quantitative model, which we suggest can predict the variation of gene expression more faithfully than the model constructed on promoters. Moreover, motivated by the fact that exon spicing is functionally coupled to transcription, we also devised a quantitative model to predict alternative exon expression using histone modifications on exons. This model was found to be general across different exon types and even cell types. Furthermore, an interaction network linking histone modifications to alternative exon expression was constructed using partial correlations. The network indicated that gene expression and specific histone modifications (H3K36me3 and H4K20me1) could directly influence the exon expression, while other modifications could act in an additive way to account for the stability and robustness. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of histone modifications contribute to exon splicing in a redundant and cumulative fashion. To conclude, this study provides a better understanding of the effects of histone modifications on gene transcribed regions.
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Prioritizing single-nucleotide variations that potentially regulate alternative splicing.
BMC Proc
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2011
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Recent evidence suggests that many complex diseases are caused by genetic variations that play regulatory roles in controlling gene expression. Most genetic studies focus on nonsynonymous variations that can alter the amino acid composition of a protein and are therefore believed to have the highest impact on phenotype. Synonymous variations, however, can also play important roles in disease pathogenesis by regulating pre-mRNA processing and translational control. In this study, we systematically survey the effects of single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) on binding affinity of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Among the 10,113 synonymous SNVs identified in 697 individuals in the 1,000 Genomes Project and distributed by Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 (GAW17), we identified 182 variations located in alternatively spliced exons that can significantly change the binding affinity of nine RBPs whose binding preferences on 7-mer RNA sequences were previously reported. We found that the minor allele frequencies of these variations are similar to those of nonsynonymous SNVs, suggesting that they are in fact functional. We propose a workflow to identify phenotype-associated regulatory SNVs that might affect alternative splicing from exome-sequencing-derived genetic variations. Based on the affecting SNVs on the quantitative traits simulated in GAW17, we further identified two and four functional SNVs that are predicted to be involved in alternative splicing regulation in traits Q1 and Q2, respectively.
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Chromatin structure characteristics of pre-miRNA genomic sequences.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2011
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs with important roles in regulating gene expression. Recent studies indicate that transcription and cleavage of miRNA are coupled, and that chromatin structure may influence miRNA transcription. However, little is known about the relationship between the chromatin structure and cleavage of pre-miRNA from pri-miRNA.
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A modulated empirical Bayes model for identifying topological and temporal estrogen receptor ? regulatory networks in breast cancer.
BMC Syst Biol
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2011
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Estrogens regulate diverse physiological processes in various tissues through genomic and non-genomic mechanisms that result in activation or repression of gene expression. Transcription regulation upon estrogen stimulation is a critical biological process underlying the onset and progress of the majority of breast cancer. Dynamic gene expression changes have been shown to characterize the breast cancer cell response to estrogens, the every molecular mechanism of which is still not well understood.
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Treatment with interleukin-12/23p40 antibody attenuates acute cardiac allograft rejection.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2011
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Interleukin (IL)-12 and -23 share the p40 subunit and are crucial for the development of T helper (Th) 1- and Th17-cell responses in acute graft rejection. However, little is known about the impact of treatment with antagonistic anti-p40 antibody in inhibiting rejection of cardiac allografts.
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Intravenous immunoglobulins for epilepsy.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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Epilepsy is a common neurological condition, with an estimated incidence of 50 per 100,000 persons. People with epilepsy may present with various types of immunological abnormalities, such as low serum IgA level, lack of IgG subclass and identification of certain types of antibodies. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment may represent a valuable approach and its efficacy has important implications for epilepsy management.
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Effect of graphene nanosheet addition on the electrochemical performance of anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.
Anal. Chim. Acta
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2011
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The structure and electronic properties of graphene nanosheet (GNS) render it a promising conducting agent in a lithium-ion battery. A graphite electrode loaded with GNS exhibits superior electrochemical properties including higher rate performance, increased specific capacity and better cycle performance compared with that obtained by adding the traditional conducting agent-acetylene black. The high-quality sp(2) carbon lattice, quasi-two-dimensional crystal structure and high aspect ratio of GNS provide the basis for a continuous conducting network to counter the decrease in electrode conductivity with increasing number of cycles, and guarantee efficient and fast electronic transport throughout the anode. Effects of GNS loading content on the electrochemical properties of graphite electrode are investigated and results indicate that the amount of conductive additives needed is decreased by using GNS. The kinetics and mechanism of lithium-storage for a GNS-loaded electrode are explored using a series of electrochemical testing techniques.
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Construction, expression, purification and biotin labeling of a single recombinant multi-epitope antigen for double-antigen sandwich ELISA to detect hepatitis C virus antibody.
Protein Pept. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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Based on B cell epitope predictions, a recombinant antigen with multiple epitopes from four Hepatitis C Virus fragments (C, NS3, NS4 and NS5) were engineered. The recombinant gene was then highly expressed in E. coli. The non-modified and C-terminal-modified recombinant proteins were used for coating and biotin labeling, respectively, to establish the double-antigen sandwich ELISA. Ten positive reference samples confirmed by the CHIRON RIBA HCV 3.0 SIA kit were detected positive, Forty one plasma samples were positive among samples from 441 volunteers, which indicated that the recombinant antigen could readily react well with plasma HCV antibody. As critical reagents of double-antigen sandwich ELISA, the recombinant multi-epitope antigen and the C-terminal-modified and biotin-conjugated antigen show good antigenicity. In this study, we provide a simple approach to produce multiple epitopes within one recombinant protein in order to avoid the costly expression of less-effective pools of multiple proteins, which is the conventional strategy of diagnostic antigen production for HCV antibody detection.
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[Preparation and characterization of non-ionic surfactant vesicle of cantharidin].
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi
PUBLISHED: 12-24-2010
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To study the preparation of cantharidin entrapped non-ionic surfactant vesicle (noisome)and evaluate its quality.
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Ginseng for cognition.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2010
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Ginseng is a herbal medicine in widespread use throughout the world. Its effect on the brain and nervous system has been investigated. It has been suggested, on the basis of both laboratory and clinical studies, that it may have beneficial effects on cognitive performance.
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Dynamic changes in Th1, Th17, and FoxP3+ T cells in patients with acute cellular rejection after cardiac transplantation.
Clin Transplant
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2010
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Previously, studies suggest that CD4(+) effector T-cell subsets participate in allograft rejection. However, the dynamic changes and relative roles of these CD4(+) effector T-cell subsets, especially Th17 cells, have not been systemically examined in patients with acute rejection after cardiac transplantation. In this study, we have studied and compared these CD4(+) T-cell subsets in peripheral blood and endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) in patients with stable-graft and acute cellular rejection. We observed that the gene expressions including T-bet, IFN-?, ROR?t, IL-17, IL-23, and FoxP3, the functional marker of Th1, Th17, and FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells, were elevated in EMB samples from patients with acute graft rejection. Accordingly, the percentages of circulating Th1, Th17, and FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells were also significantly increased. The data suggest that Th1, Th17, and FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells are associated with acute graft rejection in patients with cardiac transplantation.
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Double-antigen sandwich ELISA for the detection of anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies.
J. Virol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2010
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A double-antigen sandwich ELISA was developed a detection of HCV antibodies by a recombinant multi-epitope HCV antigen and a biotin-streptavidin amplification system. Three plasma specimens from 1708 individuals who were suspected previously to be HCV-positive using an HCV antibody diagnostic kit (Chuangxin, Xiamen, China) displayed negative results when using the ELISA. These results were validated by a recombinant immunoblotting assay (two were negative, and one was indeterminate). Among 889 blood specimens donated for clinical evaluation, 246 were positive and 630 were negative using the ELISA. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 98.7% and 100%, respectively. In 43 donors and 14 patients with chronic hepatitis C, the detectable rates for HCV IgM by both ELISA and the HCV anti-IgM detection reagents (Huimin, Shenyang, China) were 100%, and the detectable rate for HCV IgG using an indirect HCV-antibody detection kit (GWK, Beijing, China) was 98.3%. Thus, the double-antigen sandwich ELISA exhibits strong specificity and sensitivity and has been approved by the China State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). The performance of the double-antigen sandwich ELISA was similar to the Ortho ELISA 3.0. It did not give false-negative results otherwise IgM was undetectable using an indirect HCV-antibody detection kit. This ELISA provides another method for the detection of HCV antibodies.
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Prioritization of disease microRNAs through a human phenome-microRNAome network.
BMC Syst Biol
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2010
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The identification of disease-related microRNAs is vital for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases at the molecular level, and is critical for designing specific molecular tools for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Experimental identification of disease-related microRNAs poses considerable difficulties. Computational analysis of microRNA-disease associations is an important complementary means for prioritizing microRNAs for further experimental examination.
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"Default" generation of neonatal regulatory T cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2010
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CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to control all aspects of immune responses. How these Treg cells develop is not fully defined, especially in neonates during development of the immune system. We studied the induction of Treg cells from neonatal T cells with various TCR stimulatory conditions, because TCR stimulation is required for Treg cell generation. Independent of the types of TCR stimulus and without the addition of exogenous TGF-beta, up to 70% of neonatal CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells became CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells, whereas generally <10% of adult CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells became CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells under the same conditions. These neonatal Treg cells exert suppressive function and display relatively stable Foxp3 expression. Importantly, this ability of Treg cell generation gradually diminishes within 2 wk of birth. Consistent with in vitro findings, the in vivo i.p. injection of anti-CD3 mAb to stimulate T cells also resulted in a >3-fold increase in Treg cells in neonates but not in adults. Furthermore, neonatal or adult Foxp3(-) T cells were adoptively transferred into Rag1(-/-) mice. Twelve days later, the frequency of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells converted from neonatal cells was 6-fold higher than that converted from adult cells. Taken together, neonatal CD4(+) T cells have an intrinsic "default" mechanism to become Treg cells in response to TCR stimulations. This finding provides intriguing implications about neonatal immunity, Treg cell generation, and tolerance establishment early in life.
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IL-2-deprivation and TGF-beta are two non-redundant suppressor mechanisms of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell which jointly restrain CD4+CD25- cell activation.
Immunol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2010
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The benefits of immunotherapy by regulatory T (Treg) cells are unpredictable partially due to the uncertainty of their suppressive mechanism. In fact, various suppressive mechanisms have been proposed but each remains controversial. To better understand Treg-mediated suppression, we have investigated factors which may influence the suppressive effects. In an in vitro suppression assay, over-expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 enhancing survival of conventional T responder cells (Tconvs) did not subvert Treg-mediated suppression. In contrast, enhancing activation of Tconvs by increasing the potency of calcium signals completely abrogated Treg-mediated suppression. While Tregs were incapable of suppressing already activated Tconvs, they prevented expression of activation markers on naïve Tconvs during activation, thereby indicating that Tregs mediate suppression through controlling early activation stage. Interestingly, IL-2 deprivation or TGF-beta, two suppressive mechanisms, did not effectively inhibit Tconv activation and proliferation when applied alone. In contrast, IL-2 deprivation combined with TGF-beta suppressed Tconv activation as potently as Tregs. More importantly, in the transwell system, that separates Tregs from Tconvs, TGF-beta contributed to Treg suppression under IL-2 depriving condition. In conclusion, these two suppressive mechanisms acting in concert may be necessary to effectively restrain the early activation of Tconvs.
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Retinoic acid attenuates acute heart rejection by increasing regulatory T cell and repressing differentiation of Th17 cell in the presence of TGF-?.
Transpl. Int.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2010
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Retinoic acid (RA), in a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?)-dependent manner, promotes differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) but inhibits the differentiation of Th17 cells in vitro from naive CD4(+) T cells. In addition, transfer of induced Tregs (iTregs) reduces rejection. We therefore examined whether RA could attenuate acute cardiac transplant rejection in vivo in a mouse model by regulating the reciprocal differentiation of Tregs and Th17 cells. The iTregs and naive T cells were respectively transferred into congenic mice. Two weeks later, the percentages of transferred cells and Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ Tregs were measured in spleen. Mice with cardiac transplants were treated with TGF-? alone, RA alone, both or none. The percentage of Tregs or Th17 cells in CD4(+) T cells, the level of FoxP3 protein or serous interleukin (IL)-17A, or suppressive function of Tregs from recipient mice were assessed. The percentage of Th17 cells and level of serum IL-17A both increased significantly during acute rejection. RA favored differentiation to Tregs over Th17 cells. Unlike naive T cells, only a few transferred iTregs remained after transfer. Treatment with RA plus TGF-? prolonged graft survival, increased the percentage of Tregs, and decreased the percentage of Th17 cells in peripheral T cells. Tregs from all recipients had normal suppressive function. In conclusion, treatment with RA plus TGF-? attenuates acute rejection by promoting the differentiation of Tregs and inhibiting the differentiation of Th17 cells.
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RNA polymerase II binding patterns reveal genomic regions involved in microRNA gene regulation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Due to the poor annotation of primary microRNA (pri-microRNA) transcripts, the precise location of promoter regions driving expression of many microRNA genes is enigmatic. This deficiency hinders our understanding of microRNA-mediated regulatory networks. In this study, we develop a computational approach to identify the promoter region and transcription start site (TSS) of pri-microRNAs actively transcribed using genome-wide RNA Polymerase II (RPol II) binding patterns derived from ChIP-seq data. Based upon the assumption that the distribution of RPol II binding patterns around the TSS of microRNA and protein coding genes are similar, we designed a statistical model to mimic RPol II binding patterns around the TSS of highly expressed, well-annotated promoter regions of protein coding genes. We used this model to systematically scan the regions upstream of all intergenic microRNAs for RPol II binding patterns similar to those of TSS from protein coding genes. We validated our findings by examining the conservation, CpG content, and activating histone marks in the identified promoter regions. We applied our model to assess changes in microRNA transcription in steroid hormone-treated breast cancer cells. The results demonstrate many microRNA genes have lost hormone-dependent regulation in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. MicroRNA promoter identification based upon RPol II binding patterns provides important temporal and spatial measurements regarding the initiation of transcription, and therefore allows comparison of transcription activities between different conditions, such as normal and disease states.
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Signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 (STAT1) regulates microRNA transcription in interferon gamma-stimulated HeLa cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2010
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Constructing and modeling the gene regulatory network is one of the central themes of systems biology. With the growing understanding of the mechanism of microRNA biogenesis and its biological function, establishing a microRNA-mediated gene regulatory network is not only desirable but also achievable.
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IL-7, but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), during priming enhances the generation of memory CD4+ T cells.
Immunol. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2010
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Multiple activation signals (including antigen, co-stimulation, and cytokines) during T-cell priming affect the subsequent generation of memory T cells, whose survival is maintained by IL-7 and IL-15. Since the IL-7 receptor is highly expressed not only on the surface of memory T cells but also on naïve T cells, we propose that early exposure to IL-7 during priming of naïve T cells may promote their survival, and thus enhances the generation of memory cells. To test this hypothesis, TCR transgenic OT-II CD4(+) T cells were stimulated in vitro with OVA(323-339) peptide presented by syngeneic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). IL-7 or an IL-7 like cytokine, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), was added at the initial 2-day cultivation stage. We found that a short exposure to IL-7 or TSLP during priming did not affect activation, proliferation, and glucose uptake by CD4(+) T cells compared to controls when examined on culture day 6. However, the same 6-day cultures showed that IL-7 (but not TSLP) significantly decreased the frequency of apoptotic CD4(+) T cells compared to controls. More importantly, an adoptive transfer of the 6-day primed OT-II T cells into CD45.1(+) congenic mice demonstrated that IL-7 (but not TSLP) elevated by 3- and 4-fold the number of transferred CD4(+) T cells in spleen (p<0.05) and lymph nodes (p<0.05), respectively, compared to controls. Almost all transferred CD4(+) T populations displayed phenotypes of effector (CD44(+)CD62L(-)) or central (CD44(+)CD62L(+)) memory T cells. We thus conclude that exposure of CD4(+) T cells to IL-7 during priming results in an increased frequency of CD4(+) memory T cells.
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Combined treatment with chemokine receptor 5 blocker and cyclosporine induces prolonged graft survival in a mouse model of cardiac transplantation.
J. Heart Lung Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2010
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Inhibition of chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), a chemokine receptor expressed on activated T cells, is efficacious in modulating inflammation and immunity as well as in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. This study examined the effect and mechanism of CCR5 blockade in combination with cyclosporine in prolonging cardiac allograft survival in mice.
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Alcohol exposure alters DNA methylation profiles in mouse embryos at early neurulation.
Epigenetics
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2009
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Alcohol exposure during development can cause variable neurofacial deficit and growth retardation known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The mechanism underlying FASD is not fully understood. However, alcohol, which is known to affect methyl donor metabolism, may induce aberrant epigenetic changes contributing to FASD. Using a tightly controlled whole-embryo culture, we investigated the effect of alcohol exposure (88mM) at early embryonic neurulation on genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression in the C57BL/6 mouse. The DNA methylation landscape around promoter CpG islands at early mouse development was analyzed using MeDIP (methylated DNA immunoprecipitation) coupled with microarray (MeDIP-chip). At early neurulation, genes associated with high CpG promoters (HCP) had a lower ratio of methylation but a greater ratio of expression. Alcohol-induced alterations in DNA methylation were observed, particularly in genes on chromosomes 7, 10, and X; remarkably, a >10 fold increase in the number of genes with increased methylation on chromosomes 10 and X was observed in alcohol-exposed embryos with a neural tube defect phenotype compared to embryos without a neural tube defect. Significant changes in methylation were seen in imprinted genes, genes known to play roles in cell cycle, growth, apoptosis, cancer, and in a large number of genes associated with olfaction. Altered methylation was associated with significant (p<0.01) changes in expression for 84 genes. Sequenom EpiTYPER DNA methylation analysis was used for validation of the MeDIP-chip data. Increased methylation of genes known to play a role in metabolism (Cyp4f13) and decreased methylation of genes associated with development (Nlgn3, Elavl2, Sox21 and Sim1), imprinting (Igf2r) and chromatin (Hist1h3d) was confirmed. In a mouse model for FASD, we show for the first time that alcohol exposure during early neurulation can induce aberrant changes in DNA methylation patterns with associated changes in gene expression, which together may contribute to the observed abnormal fetal development.
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Transplantation of NIT-1 cells with ectopic FADDdel-GFP expression for treatment of streptozotocin-induced diabetes.
Autoimmunity
PUBLISHED: 10-09-2009
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Islet transplantation is considered a therapeutic option for type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, allorejection is one major barrier for the successful islet transplantation. In the present study, we have tested the feasibility of a deletion construct for Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD; without the death effecter domain) fused with green fluorescent protein (FADDdel-GFP) for blocking the Fas-FasL signaling pathway in prevention of transplanted beta cell destruction by allo-rejection in T1D. In vitro studies have shown that NIT-1 cells with ectopic FADDdel expression were resistant to cytokine-induced apoptosis and CTL-mediated lysis. Diabetic Balb/c mice reached normoglycemia promptly and gained weight after transplantation of NIT-1 cells with ectopic FADDdel-GFP expression. These recipients showed a significant longer survival time than that of recipients transplanted with NIT cells with ectopic GFP expression only. Our results together suggest that FADDdel could be a useful target for the improvement of islet transplantation for T1D.
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[Development of Silymarin nanocrystals lyophilized power applying nanosuspension technology].
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2009
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To prepare silymarin nanosuspension and lyophilized power for enhancing the dissilution of poorly soluble drugs.
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Genome-wide prediction of cis-acting RNA elements regulating tissue-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2009
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Human genes undergo various patterns of pre-mRNA splicing across different tissues. Such variation is primarily regulated by trans-acting factors that bind on exonic and intronic cis-acting RNA elements (CAEs). Here we report a computational method to mechanistically identify cis-acting RNA elements that contribute to the tissue-specific alternative splicing pattern. This method is an extension of our previous model, SplicingModeler, which predicts the significant CAEs that contribute to the splicing differences between two tissues. In this study, we introduce tissue-specific functional levels estimation step, which allows evaluating regulatory functions of predicted CAEs that are involved in more than two tissues.
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Reconstruct gene regulatory network using slice pattern model.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2009
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Gene expression time series array data has become a useful resource for investigating gene functions and the interactions between genes. However, the gene expression arrays are always mixed with noise, and many nonlinear regulatory relationships have been omitted in many linear models. Because of those practical limitations, inference of gene regulatory model from expression data is still far from satisfactory.
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The effects of PDL-Ig on collagen-induced arthritis.
Rheumatol. Int.
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2009
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Programmed death ligand (PDL) is a new member of the B7 family of costimulatory molecules that specifically interacts with programmed death 1 (PD-1) expressed on activated T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells. Collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) is an experimental model of arthritis that has been used to dissect the pathogenesis of human rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we have investigated the effects of PDL-Ig on CIA. Administration of PDL-Ig significantly ameliorated the disease as assessed by clinical arthritis score and histology in the joints. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17 and IL-23, in the serum was reduced by PDL-Ig treatment. These results showed a beneficial effect of PDL-Ig on CIA through anti-inflammatory actions and inhibition of cell proliferation in response to CII, suggesting that the PD-1-PDL pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, and thus PDL-Ig may be a useful therapy for the improvement of human rheumatoid arthritis.
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Estradiol-regulated microRNAs control estradiol response in breast cancer cells.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2009
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Estradiol (E2) regulates gene expression at the transcriptional level by functioning as a ligand for estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). E2-inducible proteins c-Myc and E2Fs are required for optimal ERalpha activity and secondary estrogen responses, respectively. We show that E2 induces 21 microRNAs and represses seven microRNAs in MCF-7 breast cancer cells; these microRNAs have the potential to control 420 E2-regulated and 757 non-E2-regulated mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. The serine/threonine kinase, AKT, alters E2-regulated expression of microRNAs. E2 induced the expression of eight Let-7 family members, miR-98 and miR-21 microRNAs; these microRNAs reduced the levels of c-Myc and E2F2 proteins. Dicer, a ribonuclease III enzyme required for microRNA processing, is also an E2-inducible gene. Several E2-regulated microRNA genes are associated with ERalpha-binding sites or located in the intragenic region of estrogen-regulated genes. We propose that the clinical course of ERalpha-positive breast cancers is dependent on the balance between E2-regulated tumor-suppressor microRNAs and oncogenic microRNAs. Additionally, our studies reveal a negative-regulatory loop controlling E2 response through microRNAs as well as differences in E2-induced transcriptome and proteome.
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E1B 55-kDa deleted, Ad5/F35 fiber chimeric adenovirus, a potential oncolytic agent for B-lymphocytic malignancies.
J Gene Med
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2009
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Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) provides a promising strategy for solid tumor therapy. However, relatively few studies have been addressed on hematopoietic malignancies. We previously found that ZD55, a serotype 5 (Ad5)-based, E1B 55-kDa deleted CRAd, inhibited leukemic cell growth and induced apoptosis. In the present study, we employed SG235, a new CRAd with both an E1B 55-kDa deletion and an Ad5/F35 chimeric fiber, for the treatment of B-cell tumors.
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miR2Disease: a manually curated database for microRNA deregulation in human disease.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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miR2Disease, a manually curated database, aims at providing a comprehensive resource of microRNA deregulation in various human diseases. The current version of miR2Disease documents 1939 curated relationships between 299 human microRNAs and 94 human diseases by reviewing more than 600 published papers. Around one-seventh of the microRNA-disease relationships represent the pathogenic roles of deregulated microRNA in human disease. Each entry in the miR2Disease contains detailed information on a microRNA-disease relationship, including a microRNA ID, the disease name, a brief description of the microRNA-disease relationship, an expression pattern of the microRNA, the detection method for microRNA expression, experimentally verified target gene(s) of the microRNA and a literature reference. miR2Disease provides a user-friendly interface for a convenient retrieval of each entry by microRNA ID, disease name, or target gene. In addition, miR2Disease offers a submission page that allows researchers to submit established microRNA-disease relationships that are not documented. Once approved by the submission review committee, the submitted records will be included in the database. miR2Disease is freely available at http://www.miR2Disease.org.
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PI-3 K/AKT and ERK signaling pathways mediate leptin-induced inhibition of PPARgamma gene expression in primary rat hepatic stellate cells.
Mol. Cell. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2009
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Compelling evidence indicates the pro-fibrogenic action of leptin in liver. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) can reverse hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and maintain HSC quiescence. HSC activation, a key step in the development of liver fibrosis, is coupled with the up-expression of leptin and the dramatic down-expression of PPARgamma. The present study is aimed to assess the effect of leptin on PPARgamma gene expression in primary cultured rat HSCs and investigate the related mechanisms by using Western blotting analysis, real-time PCR, transient transfection approach, and cell growth analysis. The results suggest that leptin negatively regulates PPARgamma gene expression at mRNA level, protein level and PPARgamma gene promoter activity level in HSCs. The inhibitory effect of leptin on PPARgamma gene expression contributes to cell growth of activated HSCs in vitro. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT (PI-3 K/AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways mediate the leptin-induced inhibition of PPARgamma gene expression. In summary, these findings suggest that leptin down-regulates PPARgamma gene expression through activation of PI-3 K/AKT or ERK signaling pathway in primary cultured rat HSCs. Our results might provide novel insights into the mechanisms for the pro-fibrogenic action of leptin in liver.
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Enhanced serodiagnostic utility of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis polyproteins.
J. Infect.
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The detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific antibodies in human sera has been a rapid and important diagnostic aid for tuberculosis (TB) control and prevention. However, any single antigen is not enough to be used to cover the antibody profiles of all TB patients.
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Empirical bayes model comparisons for differential methylation analysis.
Comp. Funct. Genomics
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A number of empirical Bayes models (each with different statistical distribution assumptions) have now been developed to analyze differential DNA methylation using high-density oligonucleotide tiling arrays. However, it remains unclear which model performs best. For example, for analysis of differentially methylated regions for conservative and functional sequence characteristics (e.g., enrichment of transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs)), the sensitivity of such analyses, using various empirical Bayes models, remains unclear. In this paper, five empirical Bayes models were constructed, based on either a gamma distribution or a log-normal distribution, for the identification of differential methylated loci and their cell division-(1, 3, and 5) and drug-treatment-(cisplatin) dependent methylation patterns. While differential methylation patterns generated by log-normal models were enriched with numerous TFBSs, we observed almost no TFBS-enriched sequences using gamma assumption models. Statistical and biological results suggest log-normal, rather than gamma, empirical Bayes model distribution to be a highly accurate and precise method for differential methylation microarray analysis. In addition, we presented one of the log-normal models for differential methylation analysis and tested its reproducibility by simulation study. We believe this research to be the first extensive comparison of statistical modeling for the analysis of differential DNA methylation, an important biological phenomenon that precisely regulates gene transcription.
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APE1 upregulation reduces oxidative DNA damage and protects hippocampal neurons from ischemic injury.
Antioxid. Redox Signal.
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Aims: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) is a multifunctional enzyme that participates in base-excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and in the redox activation of transcription factors. We tested the hypothesis that APE1 upregulation protects neuronal structure and function against transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI). Results: Upregulation of APE1 by low-dose proton irradiation or by transgene overexpression protected hippocampal CA1 neurons against tGCI-induced cell loss and reduced apurinic/apyrimidinic sites and DNA fragmentation. Conversely, APE1 knockdown attenuated the protection afforded by proton irradiation and ischemic preconditioning. APE1 overexpression inhibited the DNA damage response, as evidenced by lower phospho-histone H2A (H2AX) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) levels. APE1 overexpression also partially rescued dendritic spines and attenuated the decrease in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in hippocampal CA1. Presynaptic and postsynaptic markers were reduced following tGCI and this effect was also blunted in APE1 transgenics. The Morris water maze test revealed that APE1 protected against learning and memory deficits for at least 27 days post-injury. Animals expressing DNA repair-disabled mutant APE1 (D210A) exhibited more DNA damage than wild-type controls and were not protected against tGCI-induced cell loss. Innovation: This is the first study to thoroughly characterize structural and functional protection against ischemia following APE1 upregulation by measuring synaptic markers, electrophysiological function, and long-term neurological deficits in vivo. Furthermore, disabling the DNA repair activity of APE1 was found to abrogate its protective impact. Conclusion: APE1 upregulation, either endogenously or through transgene overexpression, protects DNA, neuronal structures, synaptic function, and behavioral output from ischemic injury.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.