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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
[A medical consumable material management information system].
Zhongguo Yi Liao Qi Xie Za Zhi
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2014
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Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process.
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RADB: a database of rheumatoid arthritis-related polymorphisms.
Database (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2014
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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that has a complex genetic basis. Therefore, it is important to explore the genetic background of RA. The extensive recent application of polymorphic genetic markers, especially single nucleotide polymorphisms, has presented us with a large quantity of genetic data. In this study, we developed the Database of Rheumatoid Arthritis-related Polymorphisms (RADB), to integrate all the RA-related genetic polymorphisms and provide a useful resource for researchers. We manually extracted the RA-related polymorphisms from 686 published reports, including RA susceptibility loci, polymorphisms associated with particular clinical features of RA, polymorphisms associated with drug response in RA and polymorphisms associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease in RA. Currently, RADB V1.0 contains 3235 polymorphisms that are associated with 636 genes and refer to 68 countries. The detailed information extracted from the literature includes basic information about the articles (e.g., PubMed ID, title and abstract), population information (e.g., country, geographic area and sample size) and polymorphism information (e.g., polymorphism name, gene, genotype, odds ratio and 95% confidence interval, P-value and risk allele). Meanwhile, useful annotations, such as hyperlinks to dbSNP, GenBank, UCSC, Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, are included. In addition, a tool for meta-analysis was developed to summarize the results of multiple studies. The database is freely available at http://www.bioapp.org/RADB. Database URL: http://www.bioapp.org/RADB.
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In situ bioremediation of uranium with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2013
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A field test with a one-time emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection was conducted to assess the capacity of EVO to sustain uranium bioreduction in a high-permeability gravel layer with groundwater concentrations of (mM) U, 0.0055; Ca, 2.98; NO3(-), 0.11; HCO3(-), 5.07; and SO4(2-), 1.23. Comparison of bromide and EVO migration and distribution indicated that a majority of the injected EVO was retained in the subsurface from the injection wells to 50 m downgradient. Nitrate, uranium, and sulfate were sequentially removed from the groundwater within 1-2 weeks, accompanied by an increase in acetate, Mn, Fe, and methane concentrations. Due to the slow release and degradation of EVO with time, reducing conditions were sustained for approximately one year, and daily U discharge to a creek, located approximately 50 m from the injection wells, decreased by 80% within 100 days. Total U discharge was reduced by 50% over the one-year period. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was confirmed by synchrotron analysis of recovered aquifer solids. Oxidants (e.g., dissolved oxygen, nitrate) flowing in from upgradient appeared to reoxidize and remobilize uranium after the EVO was exhausted as evidenced by a transient increase of U concentration above ambient values. Occasional (e.g., annual) EVO injection into a permeable Ca and bicarbonate-containing aquifer can sustain uranium bioreduction/immobilization and decrease U migration/discharge.
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Prediction of aluminum, uranium, and co-contaminants precipitation and adsorption during titration of acidic sediments.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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Batch and column recirculation titration tests were performed with contaminated acidic sediments. A generic geochemical model was developed combining precipitation, cation exchange, and surface complexation reactions to describe the observed pH and metal ion concentrations in experiments with or without the presence of CO2. Experimental results showed a slow pH increase due to strong buffering by Al hydrolysis and precipitation and CO2 uptake. The cation concentrations generally decreased at higher pH than those observed in previous tests without CO2. Using amorphous Al(OH)3 and basaluminite precipitation reactions and a cation exchange selectivity coefficient K(NaAl) of 0.3, the model approximately described the observed (1) pH titration curve, (2) Ca, Mg, and Mn concentration by cation exchange, and (3) U concentrations by surface complexation with Fe hydroxides at pH < 5 and with liebigite (Ca2UO2(CO3)3ยท10H2O) precipitation at pH > 5. The model indicated that the formation of aqueous carbonate complexes and competition with carbonate for surface sites could inhibit U and Ni adsorption and precipitation. Our results suggested that the uncertainty in basaluminite solubility is an important source of prediction uncertainty and ignoring labile solid phase Al underestimates the base requirement in titration of acidic sediments.
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U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor--model application to a field test.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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We amended a shallow fast-flowing uranium (U) contaminated aquifer with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and subsequently monitored the biogeochemical responses for over a year. Using a biogeochemical model developed in a companion article (Tang et al., Environ. Sci. Technol.2013, doi: 10.1021/es304641b) based on microcosm tests, we simulated geochemical and microbial dynamics in the field test during and after the 2-h EVO injection. When the lab-determined parameters were applied in the field-scale simulation, the estimated rate coefficient for EVO hydrolysis in the field was about 1 order of magnitude greater than that in the microcosms. Model results suggested that precipitation of long-chain fatty acids, produced from EVO hydrolysis, with Ca in the aquifer created a secondary long-term electron donor source. The model predicted substantial accumulation of denitrifying and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and U(IV) precipitates. The accumulation was greatest near the injection wells and along the lateral boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors mixed with electron acceptors in the groundwater. While electron acceptors such as sulfate were generally considered to compete with U(VI) for electrons, this work highlighted their role in providing electron acceptors for microorganisms to degrade complex substrates thereby enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization.
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U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor--microcosm tests and model development.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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We conducted microcosm tests and biogeochemical modeling to study U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments amended with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO). Indigenous microorganisms in the sediments degraded EVO and stimulated Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. Acetate concentration peaked in 100-120 days in the EVO microcosms versus 10-20 days in the oleate microcosms, suggesting that triglyceride hydrolysis was a rate-limiting step in EVO degradation and subsequent reactions. Acetate persisted 50 days longer in oleate- and EVO- than in ethanol-amended microcosms, indicating that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the oleate and EVO than ethanol microcosms. We developed a comprehensive biogeochemical model to couple EVO hydrolysis, production, and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of multiple functional microbial groups. By estimating EVO, LCFA, and glycerol degradation rate coefficients, and introducing a 100 day lag time for acetoclastic methanogenesis for oleate and EVO microcosms, the model approximately matched observed sulfate, U(VI), and acetate concentrations. Our results confirmed that EVO could stimulate U(VI) bioreduction in sediments and the slow EVO hydrolysis and acetate-utilizing methanogens growth could contribute to longer term bioreduction than simple substrates (e.g., ethanol, acetate, etc.) in the subsurface.
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Role of soil organic carbon and colloids in sorption and transport of TNT, RDX and HMX in training range soils.
Chemosphere
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Contamination of soils and groundwater by munitions compounds (MCs) is of significant concern at many U.S. Department of Defense sites. Soils were collected from operational training ranges in Maryland (APG), Massachusetts (MMR-B and MMR-E) and Washington (JBLM) and sorption and transport studies were conducted to investigate the effects of soil organic carbon (OC) and textural clay content on fate of dissolved MCs (TNT, RDX, HMX). Sorption experiments showed higher distribution coefficients [TNT:42-68 L kg(-1), RDX:6.9-8.7 L kg(-1) and HMX:2.6-3.1 L kg(-1)] in OC rich soils (JBLM, MMR-E) compared to clay rich soils (MMR-B and APG) [TNT:19-21 L kg(-1), RDX:2.5-3.4 L kg(-1), HMX:0.9-1.2 L kg(-1)]. In column experiments, breakthrough of MCs was faster in MMR-B and APG compared to MMR-E and JBLM soils. Among TNT, RDX and HMX, breakthrough was fastest for RDX followed by HMX and TNT for all columns. Defining the colloidal fraction as the difference between unfiltered samples and samples filtered with a 3 kDa filter, ~36%, ~15% and ~9% of TNT, RDX and HMX were found in the colloidal fraction in the solutions from sorption experiments, and around 20% of TNT in the effluent from the transport experiments. Results demonstrate that OC rich soils may enhance sorption and delay transport of TNT, RDX and HMX compared to clay-rich soils. Further, transport of TNT may be associated with soil colloid mobilization.
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Identifying highly conserved and highly differentiated gene ontology categories in human populations.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2011
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Detecting and interpreting certain system-level characteristics associated with human population genetic differences is a challenge for human geneticists. In this study, we conducted a population genetic study using the HapMap genotype data to identify certain special Gene Ontology (GO) categories associated with high/low genetic difference among 11 Hapmap populations. Initially, the genetic differences in each gene region among these populations were measured using allele frequency, linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern, and transferability of tagSNPs. The associations between each GO term and these genetic differences were then identified. The results showed that cellular process, catalytic activity, binding, and some of their sub-terms were associated with high levels of genetic difference, and genes involved in these functional categories displayed, on average, high genetic diversity among different populations. By contrast, multicellular organismal processes, molecular transducer activity, and some of their sub-terms were associated with low levels of genetic difference. In particular, the neurological system process under the multicellular organismal process category had low levels of genetic difference; the neurological function also showed high evolutionary conservation between species in some previous studies. These results may provide a new insight into the understanding of human evolutionary history at the system-level.
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Assessing the patterns of linkage disequilibrium in genic regions of the human genome.
FEBS J.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2011
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We used the genotyping data generated by the International HapMap Project to study the patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in human genic regions. LD patterns for 11,998 genes from 11 HapMap populations were identified by analyzing the distribution of haplotype blocks. The genes were prioritized using LD levels. The results showed that there were significant differences in the degree of LD between genes. Genes with high or low LD (the upper and lower quartiles of the LD levels) fell into different Gene Ontology functional categories. The high LD genes clustered preferentially in the metabolic process, macromolecule localization and cell-cycle categories, whereas the low LD genes clustered in the developmental process, ion transport, and immune and regulation system categories. Furthermore, we subdivided the genic region into 3-UTR, 5-UTR and CDS (coding region), and compared the different LD patterns in these subregions. We found that the LD patterns in low LD genes had a more interspersed block structure compared with the high LD genes. This was especially true in the CDS and 5-UTR. The extent of LD was somewhat higher in 5-UTRs compared with 3-UTRs for both high and low LD genes. In addition, we assessed the overlap for the intragenic LD regions and found that the LD regions in high LD genes were more consistent among populations. Comprehensive information about the distribution of LD patterns in gene regions in populations may provide insights into the evolutionary history of humans and help in the selection of biomarkers for disease association studies.
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A spreadsheet program for two-well tracer test data analysis.
Ground Water
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended approximate analytical solutions for the advection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well doublet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady-state flow conditions for equal injection and extraction rates with no transverse dispersion and negligible ambient flow, and implemented the solutions in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Functions were implemented to calculate concentrations in extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published-type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. The method can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test design and data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publicly available.
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The expanded human disease network combining protein-protein interaction information.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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The human disease network (HDN) has become a powerful tool for revealing disease-disease associations. Some studies have shown that genes that share similar or same disease phenotypes tend to encode proteins that interact with each other. Therefore, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) may help us to further understand the relationships between diseases with overlapping clinical phenotypes. In this study, we constructed the expanded HDN (eHDN) by combining disease gene information with PPI information, and analyzed its topological features and functional properties. We found that the network is hierarchical and, most diseases are connected to only a few diseases, whereas a small part of diseases are linked to many different diseases. Diseases in a specific disease class tend to cluster together, and genes associated with the same disease are functionally related. Comparing the eHDN with the original HDN (oHDN, constructed using disease gene information) revealed high consistency over all topological and functional properties. This, to some extent, indicates that our eHDN is reliable. In the eHDN, we found some new associations among diseases resulting from the shared genes interacting with disease genes. The new eHDN will provide a valuable reference for clinicians and medical researchers.
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Association between the IL7R T244I polymorphism and multiple sclerosis: a meta-analysis.
Mol. Biol. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2010
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Previously published analyses of the association between the interleukin 7 receptor (IL7R) T244I polymorphism (rs6897932) and multiple sclerosis (MS) have yielded conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis to assess whether the combined data showed this association, and to investigate its effect size. We analyzed 10 studies identified from PubMed (12,185 MS patients and 15,855 controls) and calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the C-allele, the C/C genotype (recessive effect) and the C/C + C/T (dominant effect) genotype. Heterogeneity within and between studies was observed: allele C: Q = 30.86, P = 0.002; genotype C/C: Q = 30.28, P = 0.003. Using a random-effects model, the C-allele and the C/C genotype were associated with MS (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04-1.19, P = 0.001 for the C-allele; OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24, P = 0.0009 for the C/C genotype). The C/C + C/T genotype was also associated with MS using a fixed-effects model (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.05-1.26, P = 0.003). There was no significant publication bias among the selected studies according to the funnel plot. We also performed the analysis on a European subgroup. This revealed an association between IL7R T244I and MS (P < 0.00001 for the C-allele and the C/C genotype; P = 0.0004 for the C/C + C/T genotype), no heterogeneity was observed (allele C: P = 0.07; genotype C/C: P = 0.10). In conclusion, the meta-analysis demonstrated that the IL7R T244I polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to MS.
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Meta-analysis of 125 rheumatoid arthritis-related single nucleotide polymorphisms studied in the past two decades.
PLoS ONE
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Candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAs) have identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) loci affecting susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, for the same locus, some studies have yielded inconsistent results. To assess all the available evidence for association, we performed a meta-analysis on previously published case-control studies investigating the association between SNPs and RA.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.