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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
ERG Oncoprotein Inhibits ANXA2 Expression and Function in Prostate Cancer.
Mol. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2014
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Overexpression of ERG in the prostate epithelium, due to chromosomal translocations, contributes to prostate tumorigenesis. Here, genomic analysis of ERG siRNA-treated prostate cells harboring the endogenous TMPRSS2-ERG fusion revealed an inverse relationship between ERG and Annexin A2 (ANXA2) expression at both the RNA and protein level. ANXA2, a Ca2+-dependent and phospholipid-binding protein, is involved in various cellular functions, including maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Mechanistic studies defined the prostate-specific transcription start site of ANXA2 and showed that the recruitment of ERG to the ANXA2 promoter is required for transcriptional repression by ERG. Knockdown of ERG enhanced the apical localization of ANXA2, the bundling of actin filaments at cell-cell junctions and formation of a polarized epithelial phenotype. ERG overexpression disrupted ANXA2 mediated cell polarity and promoted epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) by inhibiting CDC42 and RHOA, and by activating cofilin. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), demonstrated a reciprocal relationship of ANXA2 and ERG expression in a large fraction of primary prostate cancer clinical specimens. ANXA2 was absent or markedly reduced in ERG(+) tumors, which were mostly well-differentiated. ERG(-) tumors, meanwhile, expressed moderate to high levels of ANXA2, and were either poorly-differentiated or displayed subsets of poorly-differentiated cells. Taken together, the transcriptional repression of ANXA2 by ERG in prostate epithelial cells plays a critical role in abrogating differentiation, promoting EMT, and in the reciprocal correlation of ERG and ANXA2 expression observed in human prostate cancer. Implications: ANXA2 is a new component of the ERG network with potential to enhance biological stratification and therapeutic targeting of ERG stratified prostate cancers.
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Functional antagonism of TMPRSS2-ERG splice variants in prostate cancer.
Genes Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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The fusion between ERG coding sequences and the TMPRSS2 promoter is the most prevalent in prostate cancer (CaP). The presence of two main types of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcripts in CaP specimens, Type I and Type II, prompted us to hypothesize that the cumulative actions of different ERG variants may impact CaP development/progression. Using TMPRSS2-ERG3 (Type I) and TMPRSS2-ERG8 (Type II) expression vectors, we determined that the TMPRSS2- ERG8 encoded protein is deficient in transcriptional regulation compared to TMPRSS2-ERG3. Co-transfection of vectors resulted in decreased transcriptional regulation compared to TMPRSS2-ERG3 alone, suggesting transdominance of ERG8. Expression of exogenous ERG8 protein resulted in a decrease in endogenous ERG3 protein levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cells, with a concomitant decrease in C-MYC. Further, we showed a physical association between ERG3 and ERG8 in live cells by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, providing a basis for the observed effects. Inhibitory effects of TMPRSS2-ERG8 on TMPRSS2- ERG3 were also corroborated by gene expression data from human prostate cancers, which showed a positive correlation between C-MYC expression and TMPRSS2-ERG3/TMPRSS2- ERG8 ratio. We propose that an elevated TMPRSS2-ERG3/TMPRSS2-ERG8 ratio results in elevated C-MYC in CaP, providing a strong rationale for the biomarker and therapeutic utility of ERG splice variants, along with C-MYC.
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Predominance of ERG-negative high-grade prostate cancers in African American men.
Mol Clin Oncol
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2014
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Erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene (ERG) fusions, the most common and validated prostate cancer (CaP) genome alteration, result in alterations in the expression of the ERG oncoprotein. Significantly lower frequencies of ERG have been reported in tumors of African American (AA) in comparison to Caucasian American (CA) men. Building on our preliminary observations, this study has focused on the increased association of the ERG-negative status with higher-grade prostate tumors in AA men. Representative whole-mount prostate sections from a matched cohort of 63 AA and 63 CA men with Gleason scores of 4+3 and those with Gleason scores of 8-10 were analyzed for ERG oncoprotein by immunohistochemistry. The striking finding of this study was that ERG expression was 3 times more likely to be present in the higher-grade index tumors of CA men compared to AA men (31 of 63 vs. 10 of 63 patients, respectively; P<0.0001). Although the mechanisms underlying these differences have not been elucidated, the present study along with our previous observations underscores that ERG typing may enhance the understanding of ethnic differences and future targeted therapy of CaP.
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Methylation of the PMEPA1 gene, a negative regulator of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.
Epigenetics
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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The prostate transmembrane protein androgen induced 1 (PMEPA1) gene is highly expressed in prostate epithelial cells and is a direct transcriptional target for the androgen receptor (AR). AR protein levels are controlled by the AR-PMEPA1 negative feedback loop through NEDD4-E3 ligase. Reduced expression of PMEPA1 observed in prostate tumors, suggests that loss of PMEPA1 may play critical roles in prostate tumorigenesis. This study focuses on epigenetic mechanisms of reduced PMEPA1 expression in the cancer of the prostate (CaP). Benign (n = 77) and matched malignant (n = 77) prostate epithelial cells were laser capture micro-dissected from optimum cutting temperature embedded frozen prostate sections from 42 Caucasian American (CA) and 35 African American (AA) cases. Purified DNA specimens were analyzed for CpG methylation of the PMEPA1 gene. PMEPA1 mRNA expression levels were evaluated by qRT-PCR. Analysis of PMEPA1 methylation and mRNA expression in the same tumor cell populations indicated a significant inverse correlation between mRNA expression and methylation in CaP (P = 0.0115). We noted higher frequency of CpG methylation within the evaluated first intronic region of the PMEPA1 gene in prostate tumors of CA men as compared with AA. In CaP cell lines, PMEPA1 expression was induced and AR protein levels were diminished in response to treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine). Cell culture-based studies demonstrated that decitabine restores PMEPA1 expression in AR-positive CaP cell lines. This report reveals the potential role of PMEPA1 gene methylation in the regulation of AR stability. Thus, downregulation of PMEPA1 may result in increased AR protein levels and function in CaP cells, contributing to prostate tumorigenesis.
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Loss of the NKX3.1 tumorsuppressor promotes the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene expression in prostate cancer.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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In normal prostate epithelium the TMPRSS2 gene encoding a type II serine protease is directly regulated by male hormones through the androgen receptor. In prostate cancer ERG protooncogene frequently gains hormonal control by seizing gene regulatory elements of TMPRSS2 through genomic fusion events. Although, the androgenic activation of TMPRSS2 gene has been established, little is known about other elements that may interact with TMPRSS2 promoter sequences to modulate ERG expression in TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion context.
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TMPRSS2-ERG status is not prognostic following prostate cancer radiotherapy: implications for fusion status and DSB repair.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2013
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Background: Preclinical data suggest that TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions, present in about 50% of prostate cancers, may be a surrogate for DNA repair status and therefore a biomarker for DNA-damaging agents. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether TMPRSS2-ERG status was associated with biochemical failure after clinical induction of DNA damage following image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: Pretreatment biopsies from two cohorts of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer [T1/T2, Gleason score (GS) < 8, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) < 20 ng/mL; >7 years follow-up] were analyzed: (i) 126 patients [comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) cohort] with DNA samples assayed by array CGH (aCGH) for the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion; and (ii) 118 patients [immunohistochemical (IHC) cohort] whose biopsy samples were scored within a defined tissue microarray (TMA) immunostained for ERG overexpression (known surrogate for TMPRSS2-ERG fusion). Patients were treated with IGRT with a median dose of 76 Gy. The potential role of TMPRSS2-ERG status as a prognostic factor for biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR; nadir + 2 ng/mL) was evaluated in the context of clinical prognostic factors in multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional hazards model.
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Evaluation of ERG responsive proteome in prostate cancer.
Prostate
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2013
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Gene fusion between TMPRSS2 promoter and the ERG proto-oncogene is a major genomic alteration found in over half of prostate cancers (CaP), which leads to aberrant androgen dependent ERG expression. Despite extensive analysis for the biological functions of ERG in CaP, there is no systematic evaluation of the ERG responsive proteome (ERP). ERP has the potential to define new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate tumors stratified by ERG expression.
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Genetic and molecular differences in prostate carcinogenesis between African American and Caucasian American men.
Int J Mol Sci
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States. Prostate cancer incidence and associated mortality are highest in African American men in comparison to other races. The observed differences in incidence and disease aggressiveness at presentation support a potential role for different pathways of prostate carcinogenesis between African American and Caucasian men. This review focuses on some of the recent molecular biology discoveries, which have been investigated in prostate carcinogenesis and their likely contribution to the known discrepancies across race and ethnicity. Key discussion points include the androgen receptor gene structure and function, genome-wide association studies and epigenetics. The new observations of the ethnic differences of the ERG oncogene, the most common prostate cancer gene, are providing new insights into ERG based stratification of prostate cancers in the context of ethnically diverse patient populations. This rapidly advancing knowledge has the likely potential to benefit clinical practice. Current and future work will improve the ability to sub-type prostate cancers by molecular alterations and lead to targeted therapy against this common malignancy.
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Low Frequency of the ERG Oncogene Alterations in Prostate Cancer Patients from India.
J Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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ERG oncogene fusions (predominantly TMPRSS2-ERG) represent the most common (50-70% frequency) and validated prostate cancer (CaP) genome alteration in the Western countries. A common TMPRSS2-ERG fusion type leads to the androgen dependent tumor cell specific expression of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcript and amino terminally truncated ERG oncoprotein. CaP prevalence and aggressiveness, as well as genomic alterations vary in different geographic locations in the world. Recent studies from our group highlighted significantly lower frequency of ERG alterations in prostate index tumors of African American men (~30%) in comparison to Caucasian Americans (~60%). Further, much lower frequencies (10 -25%) of ERG alterations have been reported in studies from China and Japan. There is no study on ERG alterations in CaP patients from India, representing a significant portion of the world male population. This study focuses on the frequency of ERG oncoprotein expression in CaP patients from India.
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Oncogenic activation of ERG: A predominant mechanism in prostate cancer.
J Carcinog
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2011
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Prevalent gene fusions involving regulatory sequences of the androgen receptor (AR) regulated genes (primarily TMPRSS2) and protein coding sequences of nuclear transcription factors of the ETS gene family (predominantly ERG) result in unscheduled androgen dependent ERG expression in prostate cancer (CaP).Cumulative data from a large number of studies in the past six years accentuate ERG alterations in more than half of all CaP patients in Western countries. Studies underscore that ERG functions are involved in the biology of CaP. ERG expression in normal context is selective to endothelial cells, specific hematopoetic cells and pre-cartilage cells. Normal functions of ERG are highlighted in hematopoetic stem cells. Emerging data continues to unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ERG may contribute to CaP. Herein, we focus on biological and clinical aspects of ERG oncogenic alterations, potential of ERG-based stratification of CaP and the possibilities of targeting the ERG network in developing new therapeutic strategies for the disease.
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ERG oncogene modulates prostaglandin signaling in prostate cancer cells.
Cancer Biol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Androgen dependent induction of the ETS related gene (ERG) expression in more than half of all prostate cancers results from gene fusions involving regulatory sequence of androgen regulated genes (i.e. TMPRSS2, SLC45A3 and NDRG1) and protein coding sequence of the ERG. Emerging studies in experimental models underscore the functions of ERG in prostate tumorigenesis. However, biological and biochemical functions of ERG in prostate cancer (CaP) remain to be elucidated. This study suggests that ERG activation plays a role in prostaglandin signaling because knockdown of ERG expression in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion containing CaP cells leads to altered levels of the 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), a tumor suppressor and prostaglandin catabolizing enzyme, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) . We demonstrate that HPGD expression is regulated by the binding of the ERG protein to the core promoter of this gene. Moreover, prostaglandin E2 dependent cell growth and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression are also affected by ERG knockdown. Together, these data imply that the ERG oncoprotein in CaP cells positively influence prostaglandin mediated signaling, which may contribute to tumor progression.
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Evaluation of the ETS-related gene mRNA in urine for the detection of prostate cancer.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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Prevalent gene fusions in prostate cancer involve androgen-regulated promoters (primarily TMPRSS2) and ETS transcription factors (predominantly ETS-regulated gene (ERG)], which result in tumor selective overexpression of ERG in two thirds of patients. Because diverse genomic fusion events lead to ERG overexpression in prostate cancer, we reasoned that it may be more practical to capture such alterations using an assay targeting ERG sequences retained in such gene fusions. This study evaluates the potential of an assay quantitating ERG mRNA in post-digital rectal exam (DRE) urine for improving prostate cancer detection.
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Prostate cancer risk allele specific for African descent associates with pathologic stage at prostatectomy.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2010
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A region on chromosome 8q24 was recently identified as a novel prostate cancer risk locus. Inherited variation in this region is associated with prostate cancer risk in the general population (21-58%), and specific alleles show a strong association in African-American men. This study was designed to evaluate associations between 8q24 risk alleles and clinical variables, such as pathologic stage, age at diagnosis, and recurrence, in a case series of African-American men.
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The Center for Prostate Disease Research (CPDR): a multidisciplinary approach to translational research.
Urol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2009
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This article describes the history, structure, and contributions of the Center for Prostate Disease Research. It divides the organization into the clinical program at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the basic science program in Rockville, MD, and the multi-center national database. The emphasis of this article is not the achievements of the individual programs but their synergy, establishing a comprehensive multidisciplinary prostate center.
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Osteoblast-specific factor 2 expression in prostate cancer-associated stroma: identification through microarray technology.
Urology
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2009
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To better understand the gene expression patterns in tumor-associated stroma, laser-capture-microdissections from clinical specimens were analyzed by genome-wide-expression microarray technology. The epithelial-stromal interaction plays a critical role in prostate development, reactive changes, and tumorigenesis. Diverse microarray technologies have been used to characterize the molecular changes in prostate cancer. Even though these gene expression studies are compromised by the heterogeneity of the tumor, as well as by the difficulty associated with collecting appropriate counterparts to represent normal prostate cells, the gene array data from tumors have shown promising results. Currently, little is known about the tumor-associated stromal gene expression profile in prostate cancer.
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Evaluation of the 8q24 prostate cancer risk locus and MYC expression.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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Polymorphisms at 8q24 are robustly associated with prostate cancer risk. The risk variants are located in nonprotein coding regions and their mechanism has not been fully elucidated. To further dissect the function of this locus, we tested two hypotheses: (a) unannotated microRNAs (miRNA) are transcribed in the region, and (b) this region is a cis-acting enhancer. Using next generation sequencing, 8q24 risk regions were interrogated for known and novel miRNAs in histologically normal radical prostatectomy tissue. We also evaluated the association between the risk variants and transcript levels of multiple genes, focusing on the proto-oncogene, MYC. RNA expression was measured in histologically normal and tumor tissue from 280 prostatectomy specimens (from 234 European American and 46 African American patients), and paired germline DNA from each individual was genotyped for six 8q24 risk single nucleotide polymorphisms. No evidence was found for significant miRNA transcription within 8q24 prostate cancer risk loci. Likewise, no convincing association between RNA expression and risk allele status was detected in either histologically normal or tumor tissue. To our knowledge, this is one of the first and largest studies to directly assess miRNA in this region and to systematically measure MYC expression levels in prostate tissue in relation to inherited risk variants. These data will help to direct the future study of this risk locus.
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Differences in frequency of ERG oncoprotein expression between index tumors of Caucasian and African American patients with prostate cancer.
Urology
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To systematically evaluate the ETS-related gene (ERG) alterations in the multifocal tumor context using whole-mount prostatectomy specimens from African and Caucasian American patients matched for age, pathologic grade and stage. Oncogenic activation of the ERG is the most common early genomic alteration in patients with prostate cancer (CaP) in Western countries. However, ERG alterations have not been systematically examined in African American patients with a known greater risk of CaP incidence and mortality.
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TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.
PLoS ONE
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Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi)/EpCAM(+) basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.
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