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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
An S-Domain Receptor-Like Kinase, OsSIK2, Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Delays Dark-Induced Leaf Senescence in Rice.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2013
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Receptor-like kinases play important roles in plant development and defense responses; however, their functions in other processes remain unclear. Here, we report that OsSIK2, an S-domain receptor-like kinase from rice (Oryza sativa), is involved in abiotic stress and the senescence process. OsSIK2 is a plasma membrane-localized protein with kinase activity in the presence of Mn(2+). OsSIK2 is expressed mainly in rice leaf and sheath and can be induced by NaCl, drought, cold, dark, and abscisic acid treatment. Transgenic plants overexpressing OsSIK2 and mutant sik2 exhibit enhanced and reduced tolerance to salt and drought stress, respectively, compared with the controls. Interestingly, a truncated version of OsSIK2 without most of the extracellular region confers higher salt tolerance than the full-length OsSIK2, likely through the activation of different sets of downstream genes. Moreover, seedlings of OsSIK2-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibit early leaf development and a delayed dark-induced senescence phenotype, while mutant sik2 shows the opposite phenotype. The downstream PR-related genes specifically up-regulated by full-length OsSIK2 or the DREB-like genes solely enhanced by truncated OsSIK2 are all induced by salt, drought, and dark treatments. These results indicate that OsSIK2 may integrate stress signals into a developmental program for better adaptive growth under unfavorable conditions. Manipulation of OsSIK2 should facilitate the improvement of production in rice and other crops.
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RNA Interference towards the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, Is Induced in Plants Infected with Recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (B. cockerelli), is an important plant pest and the vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum), which is associated with the zebra chip disease of potatoes. Previously, we reported induction of RNA interference effects in B. cockerelli via in vitro-prepared dsRNA/siRNAs after intrathoracic injection, and after feeding of artificial diets containing these effector RNAs. In order to deliver RNAi effectors via plant hosts and to rapidly identify effective target sequences in plant-feeding B. cockerelli, here we developed a plant virus vector-based in planta system for evaluating candidate sequences. We show that recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) containing B. cockerelli sequences can efficiently infect and generate small interfering RNAs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, and more importantly delivery of interfering sequences via TMV induces RNAi effects, as measured by actin and V-ATPase mRNA reductions, in B. cockerelli feeding on these plants. RNAi effects were primarily detected in the B. cockerelli guts. In contrast to our results with TMV, recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) did not give robust infections in all plants and did not induce detectable RNAi effects in B. cockerelli. The greatest RNA interference effects were observed when B. cockerelli nymphs were allowed to feed on leaf discs collected from inoculated or lower expanded leaves from corresponding TMV-infected plants. Tomatillo plants infected with recombinant TMV containing B. cockerelli actin or V-ATPase sequences also showed phenotypic effects resulting in decreased B. cockerelli progeny production as compared to plants infected by recombinant TMV containing GFP. These results showed that RNAi effects can be achieved in plants against the phloem feeder, B. cockerelli, and the TMV-plant system will provide a faster and more convenient method for screening of suitable RNAi target sequences in planta.
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Oral delivery of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs induces RNAi effects in the potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2011
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The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli (B. cockerelli), and the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (D. citri), are very important plant pests, but they are also vectors of phloem-limited bacteria that are associated with two devastating plant diseases. B. cockerelli is the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum), which is associated with zebra chip disease of potatoes, and D. citri is the vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, which is associated with the Huanglongbing (citrus greening) disease that currently threatens the entire Florida citrus industry. Here we used EST sequence information from D. citri to identify potential targets for RNA interference in B. cockerelli. We targeted ubiquitously expressed and gut-abundant mRNAs via injection and oral acquisition of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs and were able to induce mortality in recipient psyllids. We also showed knockdown of target mRNAs, and that oral acquisition resulted primarily in mRNA knockdown in the psyllid gut. Concurrent with gene knockdown was the accumulation of target specific ? 21 nucleotide siRNAs for an abundant mRNA for BC-Actin. These results showed that RNAi can be a powerful tool for gene function studies in psyllids, and give support for continued efforts for investigating RNAi approaches as possible tools for psyllid and plant disease control.
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Epigenetic regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger 1 gene expression in prostate cancer cells.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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Aberrant up-regulation of P-Rex1 expression plays important roles in cancer progression and metastasis. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism underlying P-Rex1 gene expression in prostate cancer cells. We showed that P-Rex1 expression was much higher in metastatic prostate cancer cells than in prostate epithelial cells and non-metastatic prostate cancer cells. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors or silence of endogenous HDAC1 and HDAC2 markedly elevated P-Rex1 transcription in non-metastatic prostate cancer cells, whereas overexpression of recombinant HDAC1 in metastatic prostate cancer cells suppressed P-Rex1 expression. HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) also significantly increased P-Rex1 promoter activity and caused acetylated histones to accumulate and associate with the P-Rex1 promoter. One Sp1 site, essential for basal promoter activity, was identified as critical for the TSA effect. TSA treatment did not alter the DNA-binding activity of Sp1 toward the P-Rex1 promoter; however, it facilitated the dissociation of the repressive HDAC1 and HDAC2 from the Sp1 binding region. Interestingly, HDAC1 association with Sp1 and with the P-Rex1 promoter were much weaker in metastatic prostate cancer PC-3 cells than in non-metastatic prostate cancer cells, and HDAC inhibitors only had very modest stimulatory effects on P-Rex1 promoter activity and P-Rex1 expression in PC-3 cells. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that HDACs could regulate P-Rex1 gene transcription by interaction with Sp1 and by region-specific changes in histone acetylation within the P-Rex1 promoter. Disassociation of HDACs from Sp1 on the P-Rex1 promoter may contribute to aberrant up-regulation of P-Rex1 in cancer.
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RNAi effects on actin mRNAs in Homalodisca vitripennis cells.
J RNAi Gene Silencing
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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The xylem feeding leafhopper Homalodisaca vitripennis (H. vitripennis) is an unusually robust and efficient vector of Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative bacterium which causes several very important plant diseases. Here we investigated RNA interference (RNAi) to target actin, a key component of insect cells and whole bodies, in H. vitripennis cells. RNAi effectors were delivered via lipid based transfection and real-time RT-PCR, RNA hybridization, and microscopic analyses were employed to verify RNAi effects. When actin dsRNAs were used, a 10-fold decrease in the target H. vitripennis actin mRNA level was seen in cells. Altered phenotypic effects also were evident in transfected cells, as were small interfering RNAs, hallmarks of RNAi. The use of H. vitripennis cells and RNAi offers new opportunities to research hemipterans, the most important insect vectors of plant pathogens.
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The ethylene receptor ETR2 delays floral transition and affects starch accumulation in rice.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2009
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Ethylene regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development in dicotyledonous plants; however, its roles in monocotyledonous plants are poorly known. Here, we characterized a subfamily II ethylene receptor, ETHYLENE RESPONSE2 (ETR2), in rice (Oryza sativa). The ETR2 receptor with a diverged His kinase domain is a Ser/Thr kinase, but not a His kinase, and can phosphorylate its receiver domain. Mutation of the N box of the kinase domain abolished the kinase activity of ETR2. Overexpression of ETR2 in transgenic rice plants reduced ethylene sensitivity and delayed floral transition. Conversely, RNA interference (RNAi) plants exhibited early flowering and the ETR2 T-DNA insertion mutant etr2 showed enhanced ethylene sensitivity and early flowering. The effective panicles and seed-setting rate were reduced in the ETR2-overexpressing plants, while thousand-seed weight was substantially enhanced in both the ETR2-RNAi plants and the etr2 mutant compared with controls. Starch granules accumulated in the internodes of the ETR2-overexpressing plants, but not in the etr2 mutant. The GIGANTEA and TERMINAL FLOWER1/CENTRORADIALIS homolog (RCN1) that cause delayed flowering were upregulated in ETR2-overexpressing plants but downregulated in the etr2 mutant. Conversely, the alpha-amylase gene RAmy3D was suppressed in ETR2-overexpressing plants but enhanced in the etr2 mutant. Thus, ETR2 may delay flowering and cause starch accumulation in stems by regulating downstream genes.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.