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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Understanding the commonalities and differences in genomic organizations across closely related bacteria from an energy perspective.
Sci China Life Sci
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2014
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The availability of a large number of sequenced bacterial genomes facilitates in-depth studies about why genes (operons) in a bacterial genome are globally organized the way they are. We have previously discovered that (the relative) transcription- activation frequencies among different biological pathways encoded in a genome have a dominating role in the global arrangement of operons. One complicating factor in such a study is that some operons may be involved in multiple pathways with different activation frequencies. A quantitative model has been developed that captures this information, which tends to be minimized by the current global arrangement of operons in a bacterial (and archaeal) genome compared to possible alternative arrangements. A study is carried out here using this model on a collection of 52 closely related E. coli genomes, which revealed interesting new insights about how bacterial genomes evolve to optimally adapt to their environments through adjusting the (relative) genomic locations of the encoding operons of biological pathways once their utilization and hence transcription activation frequencies change, to maintain the above energy-efficiency property. More specifically we observed that it is the frequencies of the transcription activation of pathways relative to those of the other encoded pathways in an organism as well as the variation in the activation frequencies of a specific pathway across the related genomes that play a key role in the observed commonalities and differences in the genomic organizations of genes (and operons) encoding specific pathways across different genomes.
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DMINDA: an integrated web server for DNA motif identification and analyses.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2014
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DMINDA (DNA motif identification and analyses) is an integrated web server for DNA motif identification and analyses, which is accessible at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/DMINDA/. This web site is freely available to all users and there is no login requirement. This server provides a suite of cis-regulatory motif analysis functions on DNA sequences, which are important to elucidation of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation: (i) de novo motif finding for a given set of promoter sequences along with statistical scores for the predicted motifs derived based on information extracted from a control set, (ii) scanning motif instances of a query motif in provided genomic sequences, (iii) motif comparison and clustering of identified motifs, and (iv) co-occurrence analyses of query motifs in given promoter sequences. The server is powered by a backend computer cluster with over 150 computing nodes, and is particularly useful for motif prediction and analyses in prokaryotic genomes. We believe that DMINDA, as a new and comprehensive web server for cis-regulatory motif finding and analyses, will benefit the genomic research community in general and prokaryotic genome researchers in particular.
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DOOR 2.0: presenting operons and their functions through dynamic and integrated views.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2013
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We have recently developed a new version of the DOOR operon database, DOOR 2.0, which is available online at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/DOOR/ and will be updated on a regular basis. DOOR 2.0 contains genome-scale operons for 2072 prokaryotes with complete genomes, three times the number of genomes covered in the previous version published in 2009. DOOR 2.0 has a number of new features, compared with its previous version, including (i) more than 250 000 transcription units, experimentally validated or computationally predicted based on RNA-seq data, providing a dynamic functional view of the underlying operons; (ii) an integrated operon-centric data resource that provides not only operons for each covered genome but also their functional and regulatory information such as their cis-regulatory binding sites for transcription initiation and termination, gene expression levels estimated based on RNA-seq data and conservation information across multiple genomes; (iii) a high-performance web service for online operon prediction on user-provided genomic sequences; (iv) an intuitive genome browser to support visualization of user-selected data; and (v) a keyword-based Google-like search engine for finding the needed information intuitively and rapidly in this database.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.