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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
ACL injuries and stem cell therapy.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2014
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Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are very frequent injuries, particularly in young and active people. Arthroscopic reconstruction using tendon auto- or allograft represents the gold-standard for the management of ACL tears. Interestingly, the ACL has the potential to heal upon intensive non-surgical rehabilitation procedures. Several biological factors influence this healing process as local intraligamentous cytokines and mainly cell repair mechanisms controlled by stem cells or progenitor cells. Understanding the mechanisms of this regeneration process and the cells involved may pave the way for novel, less invasive and biology-based strategies for ACL repair. This review aims to focus on the current knowledge on the mechanisms of ACL healing, the nature and potential of ligament derived stem/progenitor cells as well as on the potential and the limitations of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating injured ACL.
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Onset of aquaporin-4 expression in the developing mouse brain.
Int. J. Dev. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2014
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The main water channel in the brain, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is involved in maintaining homeostasis and water exchange in the brain. In adult mammalian brains, it is expressed in astrocytes, mainly, and in high densities in the membranes of perivascular and subpial endfeet. Here, we addressed the question how this polarized expression is established during development. We used immunocytochemistry against AQP4, zonula occludens protein-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and ?-dystroglycan to follow astrocyte development in E15 to P3 NMRI mouse brains, and expression of AQP4. In addition we used freeze-fracture electron microscopy to detect AQP4 in the form of orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) on the ultrastructural level. We analyzed ventral, lateral, and dorsal regions in forebrain sections and found AQP4 immunoreactivity to emerge at E16 ventrally before lateral (E17) and dorsal (E18) areas. AQP4 staining was spread over cell processes including radial glial cells in developing cortical areas and became restricted to astroglial endfeet at P1-P3. This was confirmed by double labeling with GFAP. In freeze-fracture replicas OAPs were found with a slight time delay but with a similar ventral to dorsal gradient. Thus, AQP4 is expressed in the embryonic mouse brain starting at E16, earlier than previously reported. However a polarized expression necessary for homeostatic function and water balance emerges at later stages around and after birth.
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Vortex core reversal due to spin wave interference.
Phys. Rev. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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In this Letter we address spin wave dynamics involved in fast and selective vortex core polarity reversal by rotating magnetic field bursts. In a first example we explain the origin of the delayed switching for excitations with short bursts of only one period duration as an interference effect between spin wave modes. Second, when the vortex core is initially no longer at rest but in gyrotropic motion, the magnetization dynamics become more complicated and the interaction of spin waves with the vortex core leads to a variety of nonlinear effects. Our analysis allows us to explain the experimentally observed switching diagram for simultaneous excitation of spin waves and gyrotropic mode.
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Cellular specificity of the blood-CSF barrier for albumin transfer across the choroid plexus epithelium.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected) human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood-CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub-population of specialised choroid plexus epithelial cells.
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Social structure of lions (Panthera leo) is affected by management in Pendjari Biosphere Reserve, Benin.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Lion populations have undergone a severe decline in West Africa. As baseline for conservation management, we assessed the group structure of lions in the Pendjari Biosphere Reserve in Benin. This reserve, composed of one National Park and two Hunting Zones, is part of the WAP transboundary complex of protected areas. Overall mean group size was 2.6±1.7 individuals (n?=?296), it was significantly higher in the National Park (2.7±1.7, n?=?168) than in the Hunting Zones (2.2±1.5, n?=?128). Overall adult sex ratio was even, but significantly biased towards females (0.67) in the National Park and towards males (1.67) in the Hunting Zones. Our results suggest that the Pendjari lion population is affected by perturbations, such as trophy hunting.
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Bupivacaine induces short-term alterations and impairment in rat tendons.
Am J Sports Med
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
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Toxicity of the local anesthetic bupivacaine (BV) has been a matter of debate across medical fields. Numerous in vitro studies demonstrate considerable toxicity of BV on various cell types.
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Role of Rho/ROCK signaling in the interaction of melanoma cells with the blood-brain barrier.
Pigment Cell Melanoma Res
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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We have investigated the role of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in the interaction of metastatic melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. ROCK inhibition induced a shift of melanoma cells to the mesenchymal phenotype, increased the number of melanoma cells attached to the brain endothelium, and strengthened the adhesion force between melanoma and endothelial cells. Inhibition of ROCK raised the number of melanoma cells migrating through the brain endothelial monolayer and promoted the formation of parenchymal brain metastases in vivo. We have shown that inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway in melanoma, but not in brain endothelial cells, is responsible for this phenomenon. Our results indicate that the mesenchymal type of tumor cell movement is primordial in the transmigration of melanoma cells through the blood-brain barrier.
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Mechanisms that determine the internal environment of the developing brain: a transcriptomic, functional and ultrastructural approach.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We provide comprehensive identification of embryonic (E15) and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus transcriptome, with focus on junction-associated proteins, ionic influx transporters and channels. Additionally, these data are related to new structural and previously published permeability studies. Results reveal that most genes associated with intercellular junctions are expressed at similar levels at both ages. In total, 32 molecules known to be associated with brain barrier interfaces were identified. Nine claudins showed unaltered expression, while two claudins (6 and 8) were expressed at higher levels in the embryo. Expression levels for most cytoplasmic/regulatory adaptors (10 of 12) were similar at the two ages. A few junctional genes displayed lower expression in embryos, including 5 claudins, occludin and one junctional adhesion molecule. Three gap junction genes were enriched in the embryo. The functional effectiveness of these junctions was assessed using blood-delivered water-soluble tracers at both the light and electron microscopic level: embryo and adult junctions halted movement of both 286Da and 3kDa molecules into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The molecular identities of many ion channel and transporter genes previously reported as important for CSF formation and secretion in the adult were demonstrated in the embryonic choroid plexus (and validated with immunohistochemistry of protein products), but with some major age-related differences in expression. In addition, a large number of previously unidentified ion channel and transporter genes were identified for the first time in plexus epithelium. These results, in addition to data obtained from electron microscopical and physiological permeability experiments in immature brains, indicate that exchange between blood and CSF is mainly transcellular, as well-formed tight junctions restrict movement of small water-soluble molecules from early in development. These data strongly indicate the brain develops within a well-protected internal environment and the exchange between the blood, brain and CSF is transcellular and not through incomplete barriers.
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Preliminary investigation on rodent-ectoparasite associations in the highlands of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia: implications for potential zoonoses.
Integr Zool
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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We studied associations between rodents and their arthropod ectoparasites in crop fields and household compounds in the highlands of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Ectoparasite infestation indices, such as percent infestation, mean abundance, prevalence and host preferences, were calculated for each taxon. In total, 172 rodents from crop fields and 97 from household compounds were trapped. Rodent species and numbers trapped from the crop fields and household compounds were Mastomys awashensis (Lavrenchenko, Likhnova & Baskevich, 1998) (88 and 44), Arvicanthis dembeensis (Ruppel, 1842) (63 and 37) and Acomys sp. (21 and 16), respectively. A total of 558 insects and acarids (belonging to 11 taxa) were recovered from the rodents trapped in the crop fields, and 296 insects and acarid (belonging to 6 taxa) from the rodents trapped in the household compounds. Approximately 66% of the rodents trapped from the crop fields and 47% of those trapped from the household compounds were infested with ectoparasites. Laelaps sp. (64.9%) and Xenopsylla sp. (20.6%) comprised the highest proportion of the ectoparasites recovered in the crop fields, and the same ectoparasites, but in reverse order, comprised the highest proportions in the household compounds (Xenopsylla [50.3%] and Laelaps sp. [29%]). Our study revealed that crop fields and household compounds in the highlands share similar rodents and several ectoparasites. Furthermore, at least 1 of the rodent species and some of the ectoparasites identified in this study were reported to have posed medical and veterinary threats in other parts of Ethiopia and neighboring countries.
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Inhibition of leukotriene receptors boosts neural progenitor proliferation.
Cell. Physiol. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2011
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Neural stem and progenitor cells serve as a reservoir for new neurons in the adult brain throughout lifetime. One of the critical steps determining the net production of new neurons is neural progenitor proliferation, which needs to be tightly controlled. Since inflammation has detrimental effects on neurogenesis and the 5-lipoxygenase/leukotriene pathway is involved in inflammatory processes, we investigated the effects of leukotrienes and montelukast, a small molecule inhibitor of the leukotriene receptors CysLT(1)R and GPR17, on neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation. We demonstrate expression of the leukotriene receptor GPR17 by neural progenitors and by neural stem cells. Stimulation with excess amounts of leukotrienes did not affect progenitor proliferation, whereas blockade of GPR17 with montelukast strongly elevated neural stem and progenitor proliferation, while maintaining their differentiation fate and potential. This effect was associated with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting an involvement of the EGF signaling cascade. Based on our results, montelukast and the inhibition of the 5-LOX pathway might be potent candidates for future therapies employing neurogenesis to promote structural and functional improvement in neurodegeneration, neuropsychiatric disease and ageing.
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Depth-specific and spatiotemporal variation of ?13C and ?15N in Charophytes of Lake Constance: implications for food web studies.
Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2011
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Macrophytes are at the base of many lake food webs providing essential food resources for animals at higher trophic level, such as invertebrates, fish and waterbirds. However, data regarding the spatiotemporal variation in isotopic composition of macrophytes are generally missing. We measured the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of Charophytes at Lake Constance, where they constitute a major food source for waterbirds. Our data reveal seasonal and site-specific differences as well as depth-specific variations in isotopic carbon values within the littoral zone. Charophytes were enriched in (13)C at sites of higher productivity: the ?(13)C values were high in summer, at shallow and at relatively nutrient-rich sites, and comparatively low in winter, and in deeper and nutrient-poorer sites. In contrast, no temporal or spatial trend was found to explain the variability in the isotopic nitrogen values. These results imply that the seasonal timing of food intake (relative to turnover rates of consumers tissue) and the potential depth of foraging need to be taken into account when calculating the relative contribution of energy sources to diets of consumers such as waterbirds.
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Oxidative stress and blood-brain barrier dysfunction under particular consideration of matrix metalloproteinases.
Antioxid. Redox Signal.
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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A cells "redox" (oxidation and reduction) state is determined by the sum of all redox processes yielding reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and other reactive intermediates. Low amounts of ROS/RNS are generated by different mechanisms in every cell and are important regulatory mediators in many signaling processes (redox signaling). When the physiological balance between the generation and elimination of ROS/RNS is disrupted, oxidative/nitrosative stress with persistent oxidative damage of the organism occurs. Oxidative stress has been suggested to act as initiator and/or mediator of many human diseases. The cerebral vasculature is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, which is critical since cerebral endothelial cells play a major role in the creation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This article will only contain a focused introduction on the biochemical background of redox signaling, since this has been reported already in a series of excellent recent reviews. The goal of this work is to increase the understanding of basic mechanisms underlying ROS/RNS-induced BBB disruption, with a focus on the role of matrix metalloproteinases, which, after all, appear to be a key mediator in the initiation and progression of BBB damage elicited by oxidative stress.
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Distribution of alarin immunoreactivity in the mouse brain.
J. Mol. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2011
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Alarin is a 25 amino acid peptide that belongs to the galanin peptide family. It is derived from the galanin-like peptide gene by a splice variant, which excludes exon 3. Alarin was first identified in gangliocytes of neuroblastic tumors and later shown to have a vasoactive function in the skin. Recently, alarin was demonstrated to stimulate food intake as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in rodents, suggesting that it might be a neuromodulatory peptide in the brain. However, the individual neurons in the central nervous system that express alarin have not been identified. Here, we determined the distribution of alarin-like immunoreactivity (alarin-LI) in the adult murine brain. The specificity of the antibody against alarin was demonstrated by the absence of labeling after pre-absorption of the antiserum with synthetic alarin peptide and in transgenic mouse brains lacking neurons expressing the GALP gene. Alarin-LI was observed in different areas of the murine brain. A high intensity of alarin-LI was detected in the accessory olfactory bulb, the medial preoptic area, the amygdala, different nuclei of the hypothalamus such as the arcuate nucleus and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, the trigeminal complex, the locus coeruleus, the ventral chochlear nucleus, the facial nucleus, and the epithelial layer of the plexus choroideus. The distinct expression pattern of alarin in the adult mouse brain suggests potential functions in reproduction and metabolism.
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Transmigration of melanoma cells through the blood-brain barrier: role of endothelial tight junctions and melanoma-released serine proteases.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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Malignant melanoma represents the third common cause of brain metastasis, having the highest propensity to metastasize to the brain of all primary neoplasms in adults. Since the central nervous system lacks a lymphatic system, the only possibility for melanoma cells to reach the brain is via the blood stream and the blood-brain barrier. Despite the great clinical importance, mechanisms of transmigration of melanoma cells through the blood-brain barrier are incompletely understood. In order to investigate this question we have used an in vitro experimental setup based on the culture of cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) and the A2058 and B16/F10 melanoma cell lines, respectively. Melanoma cells were able to adhere to confluent brain endothelial cells, a process followed by elimination of protrusions and transmigration from the luminal to the basolateral side of the endothelial monolayers. The transmigration process of certain cells was accelerated when they were able to use the routes preformed by previously transmigrated melanoma cells. After migrating through the endothelial monolayer several melanoma cells continued their movement beneath the endothelial cell layer. Melanoma cells coming in contact with brain endothelial cells disrupted the tight and adherens junctions of CECs and used (at least partially) the paracellular transmigration pathway. During this process melanoma cells produced and released large amounts of proteolytic enzymes, mainly gelatinolytic serine proteases, including seprase. The serine protease inhibitor Pefabloc® was able to decrease to 44-55% the number of melanoma cells migrating through CECs. Our results suggest that release of serine proteases by melanoma cells and disintegration of the interendothelial junctional complex are main steps in the formation of brain metastases in malignant melanoma.
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The dark side of BrdU in neural stem cell biology: detrimental effects on cell cycle, differentiation and survival.
Cell Tissue Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2011
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5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridin (BrdU) is frequently used in anaylsis of neural stem cell biology, in particular to label and to fate-map dividing cells. However, up to now, only a few studies have addressed the question as to whether BrdU labeling per se affects the cells to be investigated. Here, we focused on the potential impact of BrdU on neurosphere cultures derived from the adult rat brain and on proliferation of progenitors in vivo. In vitro, neurospheres were pulsed for 48 h with BrdU, and cell proliferation, cell cycle, differentiation, survival and adhesion properties were subsequently analyzed. BrdU inhibited the expansion of neural progenitors as assessed by MTS assay and increased the fraction of cells in the G0/G1-phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, BrdU increased cell death and dose-dependently induced adherence of NPCs. Cell adherence was accompanied by a reduced amount of active matrix-metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Furthermore, BrdU repressed neuronal and oligodendroglial differentiation, whereas astroglial fate was not affected. In contrast to the in vitro situation, BrdU apparently did not influence endogenous proliferation of NPCs or neurogenesis in concentrations that are typically used for labeling of neural progenitors in vivo. Our results reveal so far uncharacterized effects of BrdU on adult NPCs. We conclude that, because of its ubiquitous use in stem cell biology, any potential effect of BrdU of NPCs has to be scrutinized prior to interpretation of data.
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Qualitative and quantitative detection of human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in different food matrices at retail level in Bavaria.
Foodborne Pathog. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-30-2010
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Yersinia enterocolitica is a major foodborne pathogen and the third most important bacteriological cause of diarrhea in Germany. However, studies investigating the occurrence of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in food at the retail level are very rare. Most of the studies published so far show qualitative but not quantitative data concerning the prevalence of this human pathogen. In this study the qualitative and quantitative assessment of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in different food matrices was investigated. For the qualitative analysis we used an enrichment method according to the International Organisation of Standardization (ISO) standard in combination with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method detecting the ail gene of Y. enterocolitica. After detecting Y. enterocolitica in a sample, a quantitative investigation on Cefsulodin-Irgasan-Novobiocin (CIN) Agar was done to get information about the contamination level of the different samples. During the years 2008 and 2009, 446 samples of pork and pork products, 51 samples of game meat, and 61 raw milk samples were investigated for the presence of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica. The samples were collected at the retail level in Bavaria. From the pork samples investigated, 81 samples (18%) were positive for the ail gene by real-time PCR, but human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica O:3 were found only in 46 (10%) pork samples by culture; the concentration in the samples ranged between 0.04 cfu/g and 2.30?×?10(5) cfu/g. Three game meat samples were positive by real-time PCR, but not by the cultural detection. All raw milk samples were negative by real-time PCR and culture.
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NEUROBID--an EU-funded project to study the developing brain barriers.
Int. J. Dev. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2010
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Brain diseases are one of the most prevalent groups of diseases in Europe with estimated annual costs amounting to euro386 billion. Data collected by the WHO suggest that brain diseases are responsible for 35% of Europes total disease burden. In the treatment of neurological disease, the blood brain barrier (BBB) still represents an obstacle for the delivery of drugs to the brain and thus a major challenge for the development of therapeutic regimens. Understanding the molecular basis and functioning of the BBB in health and disease, including transport mechanisms across the BBB, therefore holds significant potential for future strategies to prevent and ameliorate neurological disease. Recent research indicates that some neurological disorders have a developmental etiologic component. The major goal of the NEUROBID project is thus to understand the molecular mechanisms and function of the BBB in health and disease both in the developing brain and the adult central nervous system. With an interdisciplinary consortium from the fields of developmental neurobiology and BBB research, NEUROBID aims to (i) understand the involvement of normal and disturbed BBB function in normal and abnormal brain development and (ii) to develop novel strategies for drug delivery to the brain. Unique transport mechanisms across the BBB will be used to target potential therapeutic macromolecular and cellular agents specifically to the brain barriers and transport them into the brain. The main target disorders of NEUROBID are non-inherited neurodevelopmental disorders arising from perinatal adverse exposure, such as cerebral palsy, and classic adult neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. In the long term, NEUROBID hopes to pave the way for new treatment strategies and thus reduce the economic and social burden of neurological disease.
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Effects of crystalline glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide on cultered human supraspinatus tendon cells.
Acta Orthop
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2009
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Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and impairment. Subacromial glucocorticoid injections are widely used for treatment of epiphenomenons of chronic impingement syndrome with the possible side effects of tendon rupture and impaired tendon healing.
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Object properties and cognitive load in the formation of associative memory during precision lifting.
Behav. Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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When we manipulate familiar objects in our daily life, our grip force anticipates the physical demands right from the moment of contact with the object, indicating the existence of a memory for relevant object properties. This study explores the formation and consolidation of the memory processes that associate either familiar (size) or arbitrary object features (color) with object weight. In the general task, participants repetitively lifted two differently weighted objects (580 and 280 g) in a pseudo-random order. Forty young healthy adults participated in this study and were randomly distributed into four groups: Color Cue Single task (CCS, blue and red, 9.8(3)cm(3)), Color Cue Dual task (CCD), No Cue (NC) and Size Cue (SC, 9.8(3) and 6(3)cm(3)) group. All groups performed a repetitive precision grasp-lift task and were retested with the same protocol after a 5-min pause. The CCD group was also required to simultaneously perform a memory task during each lift of differently weighted objects coded by color. The results show that groups lifting objects with arbitrary or familiar features successfully formed the association between object weight and manipulated object features and incorporated this into grip force programming, as observed in the different scaling of grip force and grip force rate for different object weights. An arbitrary feature, i.e., color, can be sufficiently associated with object weight, however with less strength than the familiar feature of size. The simultaneous memory task impaired anticipatory force scaling during repetitive object lifting but did not jeopardize the learning process and the consolidation of the associative memory.
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Brain pericyte plasticity as a potential drug target in CNS repair.
Drug Discov. Today
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Brain pericytes (BrPCs) are essential cellular components of the central nervous system neurovascular unit involved in the regulation of blood flow, blood-brain barrier function, as well as in the stabilization of the vessel architecture. More recently, it became evident that BrPCs, besides their regulatory activities in brain vessel function and homeostasis, have pleiotropic functions in the adult CNS ranging from stromal and regeneration promoting activities to stem cell properties. This special characteristic confers BrPC cell plasticity, being able to display features of other cells within the organism. BrPCs might also be causally involved in certain brain diseases. Due to these properties BrPCs might be potential drug targets for future therapies of neurological disorders. This review summarizes BrPC properties, disorders in which this cell type might be involved, and provides suggestions for future therapeutic developments targeting BrPCs.
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The chromosome 15q14 locus for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: is C15orf53 a major candidate gene?
J Psychiatr Res
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Bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia are complexly inherited and highly heritable disorders with currently unknown etiologies. Recently, two independent genome-wide association studies for BD identified a small region on chromosome 15q14-15.1, pointing to a locus close to the gene C15orf53. Previously, this genomic region was also found to co-segregate with periodic catatonia (SCZD10, OMIM %605419), an unsystematic schizophrenia according to Leonhards classification, in several multiplex families, thus pointing to overlapping etiologies of both conditions. A susceptibility locus on chromosome 15q14-15.1 was narrowed down to a 4.38 Mb region in these affected families followed by mutation and segregation analyses of C15orf53. Association analysis of individuals affected by BD and/or SCZD10 (n = 274) and controls (n = 230) and expression analyses in distinct post-mortem human limbic brain tissues were conducted. C15orf53 revealed no mutations in our SCZD10 family members, but segregation of two common haplotypes was found. No association of identified haplotypes was found in our case-control samples. Gene expression could be demonstrated for immune-system-derived cells but not for the post-mortem human limbic brain tissue. Our results indicate that C15orf53 is probably neither causative for the etiology of BD nor for SCZD10 in our samples.
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Molecular characterisation of transport mechanisms at the developing mouse blood-CSF interface: a transcriptome approach.
PLoS ONE
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Exchange mechanisms across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier in the choroid plexuses within the cerebral ventricles control access of molecules to the central nervous system, especially in early development when the brain is poorly vascularised. However, little is known about their molecular or developmental characteristics. We examined the transcriptome of lateral ventricular choroid plexus in embryonic day 15 (E15) and adult mice. Numerous genes identified in the adult were expressed at similar levels at E15, indicating substantial plexus maturity early in development. Some genes coding for key functions (intercellular/tight junctions, influx/efflux transporters) changed expression during development and their expression patterns are discussed in the context of available physiological/permeability results in the developing brain. Three genes: Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc), Glycophorin A (Gypa) and C (Gypc), were identified as those whose gene products are candidates to target plasma proteins to choroid plexus cells. These were investigated using quantitative- and single-cell-PCR on plexus epithelial cells that were albumin- or total plasma protein-immunopositive. Results showed a significant degree of concordance between plasma protein/albumin immunoreactivity and expression of the putative transporters. Immunohistochemistry identified SPARC and GYPA in choroid plexus epithelial cells in the embryo with a subcellular distribution that was consistent with transport of albumin from blood to cerebrospinal fluid. In adult plexus this pattern of immunostaining was absent. We propose a model of the cellular mechanism in which SPARC and GYPA, together with identified vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) may act as receptors/transporters in developmentally regulated transfer of plasma proteins at the blood-CSF interface.
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Hedgehog-EGFR cooperation response genes determine the oncogenic phenotype of basal cell carcinoma and tumour-initiating pancreatic cancer cells.
EMBO Mol Med
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Inhibition of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signalling in cancer is a promising therapeutic approach. Interactions between HH/GLI and other oncogenic pathways affect the strength and tumourigenicity of HH/GLI. Cooperation of HH/GLI with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling promotes transformation and cancer cell proliferation in vitro. However, the in vivo relevance of HH-EGFR signal integration and the critical downstream mediators are largely undefined. In this report we show that genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR signalling reduces tumour growth in mouse models of HH/GLI driven basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We describe HH-EGFR cooperation response genes including SOX2, SOX9, JUN, CXCR4 and FGF19 that are synergistically activated by HH-EGFR signal integration and required for in vivo growth of BCC cells and tumour-initiating pancreatic cancer cells. The data validate EGFR signalling as drug target in HH/GLI driven cancers and shed light on the molecular processes controlled by HH-EGFR signal cooperation, providing new therapeutic strategies based on combined targeting of HH-EGFR signalling and selected downstream target genes.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.