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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Staphylococcus aureus mobile genetic elements.
Mol. Biol. Rep.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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Among the bacteria groups, most of them are known to be beneficial to human being whereas only a minority is being recognized as harmful. The pathogenicity of bacteria is due, in part, to their rapid adaptation in the presence of selective pressures exerted by the human host. In addition, through their genomes, bacteria are subject to mutations, various rearrangements or horizontal gene transfer among and/or within bacterial species. Bacteria's essential metabolic functions are generally encoding by the core genes. Apart of the core genes, there are several number of mobile genetic elements (MGE) acquired by horizontal gene transfer that might be beneficial under certain environmental conditions. These MGE namely bacteriophages, transposons, plasmids, and pathogenicity islands represent about 15% Staphylococcus aureus genomes. The acquisition of most of the MGE is made by horizontal genomic islands (GEI), recognized as discrete DNA segments between closely related strains, transfer. The GEI contributes to the wide spread of microorganisms with an important effect on their genome plasticity and evolution. The GEI are also involve in the antibiotics resistance and virulence genes dissemination. In this review, we summarize the mobile genetic elements of S. aureus.
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Mass spectrometry and multiplex antigen assays to assess microbial quality and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical and food samples.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2014
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The aim of our study was to investigate the microbial quality of meat products and on some clinical samples in Abidjan focused on Staphylococcus genus and the toxin production profile of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated. Bacteria were collected from 240 samples of three meat products sold in Abidjan and 180 samples issued from clinical infections. The strains were identified by both microbiological and MALDI-TOF-MS methods. The susceptibility to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The production of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, LukE/D, and epidermolysins was screened using radial gel immunodiffusion. The production of staphylococcal enterotoxins and TSST-1 was screened by a Bio-Plex Assay. We observed that 96/240 of meat samples and 32/180 of clinical samples were contaminated by Staphylococcus. Eleven species were isolated from meats and 4 from clinical samples. Forty-two S. aureus strains were isolated from ours samples. Variability of resistance was observed for most of the tested antibiotics but none of the strains displays a resistance to imipenem and quinolones. We observed that 89% of clinical S. aureus were resistant to methicillin against 58% for those issued from meat products. All S. aureus isolates issued from meat products produce epidermolysins whereas none of the clinical strains produced these toxins. The enterotoxins were variably produced by both clinical and meat product samples.
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Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections.
BMC Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
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Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections.
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Staphylococcal Panton-Valentine leucocidin as a major virulence factor associated to furuncles.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2011
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Panton-Valentine Leucocidin (PVL), one of the ?-barrel pore-forming staphylococcal leucotoxins, is known to be associated to furuncles and some severe community pneumonia. However, it is still uncertain how many other virulence factors are also associated to furuncles and what the risk factors of furuncles are in immuno-compromised status of patients, especially the HIV (+) patients. In this paper, we use antigen immunoprecipitation and multiplex PCR approach to determine the presence of 19 toxins, 8 adhesion factors and the PFGE profiles associated to furuncles in three independent patient study groups of S. aureus (SA) isolates collected from the Cayenne General Hospital (French Guiana). The patient groups were made of: 16 isolates from HIV (-) patients, 9 from HIV (+) patients suffering from furuncles, and 30 control isolates from patients with diverse secondary infected dermatitis. Our data reveals that the majority (96%) of SA strains isolated from HIV patient-derived furuncles significantly produced PVL (p<10(-7)), whereas only 10% of SA strains produced this toxin in secondary infected dermatosis. A high prevalence of LukE-LukD-producing isolates (56 to 78%) was recorded in patient groups. Genes encoding clumping factor B, collagen- and laminin-binding proteins (clfB, cna, lbp, respectively) were markedly frequent (30 to 55%), without being associated to a specific group. Pulse field gel electrophoresis evidenced 24 overall pulsotypes, whereas the 25 PVL-producing isolates were distributed into 15 non clonal fingerprints. These pulsotypes were not specific PVL-producing isolates. PVL appears to be the major virulence factor associated to furuncles in Europe and in South America regardless of the immune status of the HIV patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.