JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
ER?1: characterization, prognosis, and evaluation of treatment strategies in ER?-positive and -negative breast cancer.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The role and clinical value of ER?1 expression is controversial and recent data demonstrates that many ER? antibodies are insensitive and/or non-specific. Therefore, we sought to comprehensively characterize ER?1 expression across all sub-types of breast cancer using a validated antibody and determine the roles of this receptor in mediating response to multiple forms of endocrine therapy both in the presence and absence of ER? expression.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of gene regulation patterns underlying both oestrogen- and tamoxifen-stimulated cell growth through global gene expression profiling in breast cancer cells.
Eur. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A c-Src inhibitor blocks oestrogen (E2)-induced stress and converts E2 responses from inducing apoptosis to growth stimulation in E2-deprived breast cancer cells. A reprogrammed cell line, MCF-7:PF, results in a functional oestrogen receptor (ER). We addressed the question of whether the selective ER modulator 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) could target ER to prevent E2-stimulated growth in MCF-7:PF cells.
Related JoVE Video
A molecular model for the mechanism of acquired tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.
Eur. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Oestrogen (E2)-stimulated growth re-emerges after a c-Src inhibitor blocking E2-induced apoptosis. A resulting cell line, MCF-7:PF, is selected with features of functional oestrogen receptor (ER) and over-expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor beta (IGF-1R?). We addressed the question of whether the selective ER modulator (SERM), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) or other SERMs could target ER to prevent E2-stimulated growth in MCF-7:PF cells.
Related JoVE Video
Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type, displays frequent inactivating germline and somatic mutations in SMARCA4.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Small cell carcinoma of the ovary of hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) is an extremely rare, aggressive cancer affecting children and young women. We identified germline and somatic inactivating mutations in the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling gene SMARCA4 in 75% (9/12) of SCCOHT cases in addition to SMARCA4 protein loss in 82% (14/17) of SCCOHT tumors but in only 0.4% (2/485) of other primary ovarian tumors. These data implicate SMARCA4 in SCCOHT oncogenesis.
Related JoVE Video
Regulation of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition by PARAXIS during somitogenesis.
Dev. Dyn.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Dynamic alterations in cell shape, migration, and adhesion play a central role in tissue morphogenesis during embryonic development and congenital disease. The mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition that occurs during vertebrate somitogenesis is required for proper patterning of the axial musculoskeletal system. Somitic MET is initiated in the presomitic mesoderm by PARAXIS-dependent changes in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and the composition of the extracellular matrix. However, the target genes downstream of the transcription factor PARAXIS remain poorly described.
Related JoVE Video
Expression of quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 is associated with a highly invasive phenotype and correlates with a poor prognosis in Luminal B breast cancer.
Breast Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1) oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to form disulfide bonds in proteins. Tumor specific expression of QSOX1 has been reported for numerous tumor types. In this study, we investigate QSOX1 as a marker of breast tumor progression and evaluate the role of QSOX1 as it relates to breast tumor growth and metastasis. METHODS: Correlation of QSOX1 expression with breast tumor grade, subtype and estrogen receptor (ER) status was gathered through informatic analysis using the "Gene expression based Outcome for Breast cancer Online" (GOBO) web-based tool. Expression of QSOX1 protein in breast tumors tissue microarray (TMA) and in a panel of breast cancer cell lines was used to confirm our informatics analysis. To investigate malignant cell mechanisms for which QSOX1 might play a key role, we suppressed QSOX1 protein expression using short hairpin (sh) RNA in ER+ Luminal A-like MCF7, ER+ Luminal B-like BT474 and ER- Basal-like BT549 breast cancer cell lines. RESULTS: GOBO analysis revealed high levels of QSOX1 RNA expression in ER+ subtypes of breast cancer. In addition, Kaplan Meyer analyses revealed QSOX1 RNA as a highly significant predictive marker for both relapse and poor overall survival in Luminal B tumors. We confirmed this finding by evaluation of QSOX1 protein expression in breast tumors and in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Expression of QSOX1 in breast tumors correlates with increasing tumor grade and high Ki-67 expression. Suppression of QSOX1 protein slowed cell proliferation as well as dramatic inhibition of MCF7, BT474 and BT549 breast tumor cells from invading through Matrigelâ„¢ in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Inhibition of invasion could be rescued by the exogenous addition of recombinant QSOX1. Gelatin zymography indicated that QSOX1 plays an important role in the function of MMP-9, a key mediator of breast cancer invasive behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results suggest that QSOX1 is a novel biomarker for risk of relapse and poor survival in Luminal B breast cancer, and has a pro-proliferative and pro-invasive role in malignant progression partly mediated through a decrease in MMP-9 functional activity.
Related JoVE Video
In Vitro Assessment of the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cell Line SUM 149: Discovery of 2 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the RNase L Gene.
J Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, highly aggressive form of breast cancer. The mechanism of IBC carcinogenesis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for IBC and whether or not the IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190 demonstrated evidence of viral infection.Methods: We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for 2 variants of the ribonuclease (RNase) L gene that have been correlated with the risk of prostate cancer due to a possible viral etiology. We evaluated dose-response to treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-?); and assayed for evidence of the putative human mammary tumor virus (HMTV, which has been implicated in IBC) in SUM149 cells. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to evaluate expression of RNase L in IBC and non-IBC.Results: 2 of 2 IBC cell lines were homozygous for RNase L common missense variants 462 and 541; whereas 2 of 10 non-IBC cell lines were homozygous positive for the 462 variant (p= 0.09) and 0 of 10 non-IBC cell lines were homozygous positive for the 541 variant (p = 0.015). Our real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot analysis for sequences of HMTV revealed no evidence of the putative viral genome.Conclusion: We discovered 2 SNPs in the RNase L gene that were homozygously present in IBC cell lines. The 462 variant was absent in non-IBC lines. Our discovery of these SNPs present in IBC cell lines suggests a possible biomarker for risk of IBC. We found no evidence of HMTV in SUM149 cells. A query of a panel of human IBC and non-IBC samples showed no difference in RNase L expression. Further studies of the RNase L 462 and 541 variants in IBC tissues are warranted to validate our in vitro findings.
Related JoVE Video
Androgen Receptor-Positive Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Unique Breast Cancer Subtype.
Ann. Surg. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The significance of androgen receptor (AR) expression in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is unclear, and published studies so far have been inconclusive.
Related JoVE Video
The St. Gallen Prize Lecture 2011: evolution of long-term adjuvant anti-hormone therapy: consequences and opportunities.
Breast
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The successful translation of the scientific principles of targeting the breast tumour oestrogen receptor (ER) with the nonsteroidal anti-oestrogen tamoxifen and using extended durations (at least 5 years) of adjuvant therapy, dramatically increased patient survivorship and significantly enhanced a drop in national mortality rates from breast cancer. The principles are the same for the validation of aromatase inhibitors to treat post-menopausal patients but tamoxifen remains a cheap, life-saving medicine for the pre-menopausal patient. Results from the Oxford Overview Analysis illustrate the scientific principle of "longer is better" for adjuvant therapy in pre-menopausal patients. One year of adjuvant therapy is ineffective at preventing disease recurrence or reducing mortality, whereas five years of adjuvant tamoxifen reduces recurrence by 50% which is maintained for a further ten years after treatment stops. Mortality is reduced but the magnitude continues to increase to 30% over a 15-year period. With this clinical database, it is now possible to implement simple solutions to enhance survivorship. Compliance with long-term anti-hormone adjuvant therapy is critical. In this regard, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to reduce severe menopausal side effects may be inappropriate. It is known that SSRIs block the CYP2D6 enzyme that metabolically activates tamoxifen to its potent anti-oestrogenic metabolite, endoxifen. The selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, does not block CYP2D6, and may be a better choice. Nevertheless, even with perfect compliance, the relentless drive of the breast cancer cell to acquire resistance to therapy persists. The clinical application of long-term anti-hormonal therapy for the early treatment and prevention of breast cancer, focused laboratory research on the discovery of mechanisms involved in acquired anti-hormone resistance. Decades of laboratory study to reproduce clinical experience described not only the unique mechanism of selective ER modulator (SERM)-stimulated breast cancer growth, but also a new apoptotic biology of oestradiol action in breast cancer, following 5 years of anti-hormonal treatment. Oestradiol-induced apoptotic therapy is currently shown to be successful for the short-term treatment of metastatic ER positive breast cancer following exhaustive treatment with anti-hormones. The "oestrogen purge" concept is now being integrated into trials of long-term adjuvant anti-hormone therapy. The Study of Letrazole Extension (SOLE) trial employs "anti-hormonal drug holidays" so that a womans own oestrogen may periodically purge and kill the nascent sensitized breast cancer cells that are developing. This is the translation of an idea first proposed at the 1992 St. Gallen Conference. Although tamoxifen is the first successful targeted therapy in cancer, the pioneering medicine is more than that. A study of the pharmacology of tamoxifen opened the door for a pioneering application in cancer chemoprevention and created a new drug group: the SERMs, with group members (raloxifene and lasofoxifene) approved for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis with a simultaneous reduction of breast cancer risk. Thus, the combined strategies of long-term anti-hormone adjuvant therapy, targeted to the breast tumour ER, coupled with the expanding use of SERMs to prevent osteoporosis and prevent breast cancer as a beneficial side effect, have advanced patient survivorship significantly and promise to reduce breast cancer incidence.
Related JoVE Video
Estrogen induces apoptosis in estrogen deprivation-resistant breast cancer through stress responses as identified by global gene expression across time.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In laboratory studies, acquired resistance to long-term antihormonal therapy in breast cancer evolves through two phases over 5 y. Phase I develops within 1 y, and tumor growth occurs with either 17?-estradiol (E(2)) or tamoxifen. Phase II resistance develops after 5 y of therapy, and tamoxifen still stimulates growth; however, E(2) paradoxically induces apoptosis. This finding is the basis for the clinical use of estrogen to treat advanced antihormone-resistant breast cancer. We interrogated E(2)-induced apoptosis by analysis of gene expression across time (2-96 h) in MCF-7 cell variants that were estrogen-dependent (WS8) or resistant to estrogen deprivation and refractory (2A) or sensitive (5C) to E(2)-induced apoptosis. We developed a method termed differential area under the curve analysis that identified genes uniquely regulated by E(2) in 5C cells compared with both WS8 and 2A cells and hence, were associated with E(2)-induced apoptosis. Estrogen signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), and inflammatory response genes were overrepresented among the 5C-specific genes. The identified ERS genes indicated that E(2) inhibited protein folding, translation, and fatty acid synthesis. Meanwhile, the ERS-associated apoptotic genes Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM; BCL2L11) and caspase-4 (CASP4), among others, were induced. Evaluation of a caspase peptide inhibitor panel showed that the CASP4 inhibitor z-LEVD-fmk was the most active at blocking E(2)-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, z-LEVD-fmk completely prevented poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, E(2)-inhibited growth, and apoptotic morphology. The up-regulated proinflammatory genes included IL, IFN, and arachidonic acid-related genes. Functional testing showed that arachidonic acid and E(2) interacted to superadditively induce apoptosis. Therefore, these data indicate that E(2) induced apoptosis through ERS and inflammatory responses in advanced antihormone-resistant breast cancer.
Related JoVE Video
Context-specific gene regulatory networks subdivide intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease with respect to molecular alterations and cellular composition making therapeutic and clinical outcome unpredictable. This diversity creates a significant challenge in developing tumor classifications that are clinically reliable with respect to prognosis prediction.
Related JoVE Video
The G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 inhibits proliferation of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 binds 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) yet differs from classic estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta). GPR30 can mediate E(2)-induced nongenomic signaling, but its role in ERalpha-positive breast cancer remains unclear. Gene expression microarray data from five cohorts comprising 1,250 breast carcinomas showed an association between increased GPR30 expression and ERalpha-positive status. We therefore examined GPR30 in estrogenic activities in ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells using G-1 and diethylstilbestrol (DES), ligands that selectively activate GPR30 and ER, respectively, and small interfering RNAs. In expression studies, E(2) and DES, but not G-1, transiently downregulated both ER and GPR30, indicating that this was ER mediated. In Ca(2+) mobilization studies, GPR30, but not ERalpha, mediated E(2)-induced Ca(2+) responses because E(2), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (activates GPR30), and G-1, but not DES, elicited cytosolic Ca(2+) increases not only in MCF-7 cells but also in ER-negative SKBr3 cells. Additionally, in MCF-7 cells, GPR30 depletion blocked E(2)-induced and G-1-induced Ca(2+) mobilization, but ERalpha depletion did not. Interestingly, GPR30-coupled Ca(2+) responses were sustained and inositol triphosphate receptor mediated in ER-positive MCF-7 cells but transitory and ryanodine receptor mediated in ER-negative SKBr3 cells. Proliferation studies involving GPR30 depletion indicated that the role of GPR30 was to promote SKBr3 cell growth but reduce MCF-7 cell growth. Supporting this, G-1 profoundly inhibited MCF-7 cell growth, potentially via p53 and p21 induction. Further, flow cytometry showed that G-1 blocked MCF-7 cell cycle progression at the G(1) phase. Thus, GPR30 antagonizes growth of ERalpha-positive breast cancer and may represent a new target to combat this disease.
Related JoVE Video
Deep clonal profiling of formalin fixed paraffin embedded clinical samples.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues are a vast resource of annotated clinical samples. As such, they represent highly desirable and informative materials for the application of high definition genomics for improved patient management and to advance the development of personalized therapeutics. However, a limitation of FFPE tissues is the variable quality of DNA extracted for analyses. Furthermore, admixtures of non-tumor and polyclonal neoplastic cell populations limit the number of biopsies that can be studied and make it difficult to define cancer genomes in patient samples. To exploit these valuable tissues we applied flow cytometry-based methods to isolate pure populations of tumor cell nuclei from FFPE tissues and developed a methodology compatible with oligonucleotide array CGH and whole exome sequencing analyses. These were used to profile a variety of tumors (breast, brain, bladder, ovarian and pancreas) including the genomes and exomes of matching fresh frozen and FFPE pancreatic adenocarcinoma samples.
Related JoVE Video
PAR6B is required for tight junction formation and activated PKC? localization in breast cancer.
Am J Cancer Res
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Dysregulation of mechanisms that govern the control of epithelial cell polarity, morphology and plasticity are emerging as key processes in tumor progression. In this study we report amplification and overexpression of PAR6B, an essential component in epithelial cell tight junction (TJ) formation and maintenance of apico-basal polarity, in breast cancer cell lines. Analysis of chromosome 20q13.13 in 11 breast cancer cell lines by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identified a novel small amplicon centered at PARD6B in 5 cell lines, with copy number ranging from 7 to 27. The presence of the PARD6B amplicon correlated with PARD6B transcript and PAR6B protein abundance. Expression of related isoforms PARD6A and PARD6G were detectable at significantly lower levels. PARD6B overexpression correlated with TJ network formation in cultured cell monolayers. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of PAR6B in MCF7 resulted in loss of TJ assembly and membrane localization of atypical PKC? (aPKC), but did not affect adherens junction formation. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of CDC42 in MCF7 also resulted in loss of TJ networks, confirming the requirement of a complete PAR6-aPKC-CDC42-PAR3 complex to activate and stabilize TJs. Immunohistochemical analysis of PAR6B expression on breast tumor microarrays indicated exquisite epithelial cell-specificity. Few quantitative differences in staining were observed between normal epithelium and adjacent tumor margins. However staining appeared reduced and cytoplasmic in more poorly differentiated tumors. We propose that quantitative imbalances in the components of pathways governing normal epithelial cell polarity arising from gain or loss of function may radically alter epithelial cell architecture and contribute to tumor progression.
Related JoVE Video
Detection of redundant fusion transcripts as biomarkers or disease-specific therapeutic targets in breast cancer.
Cancer Res.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Fusion genes and fusion gene products are widely employed as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in hematopoietic cancers, but their applications have yet to be appreciated in solid tumors. Here, we report the use of SnowShoes-FTD, a powerful new analytic pipeline that can identify fusion transcripts and assess their redundancy and tumor subtype-specific distribution in primary tumors. In a study of primary breast tumors, SnowShoes-FTD was used to analyze paired-end mRNA-Seq data from a panel of estrogen receptor (ER)(+), HER2(+), and triple-negative primary breast tumors, identifying tumor-specific fusion transcripts by comparison with mRNA-Seq data from nontransformed human mammary epithelial cell cultures plus the Illumina Body Map data from normal tissues. We found that every primary breast tumor that was analyzed expressed one or more fusion transcripts. Of the 131 tumor-specific fusion transcripts identified, 86 were "private" (restricted to a single tumor) and 45 were "redundant" (distributed among multiple tumors). Among the redundant fusion transcripts, 7 were unique to ER(+) tumors and 8 were unique to triple-negative tumors. In contrast, none of the redundant fusion transcripts were unique to HER2(+) tumors. Both private and redundant fusion transcripts were widely expressed in primary breast tumors, with many mapping to genomic loci implicated in breast carcinogenesis and/or risk. Our finding that some fusion transcripts are tumor subtype-specific suggests that these entities may be critical determinants in the etiology of breast cancer subtypes, useful as biomarkers for tumor stratification, or exploitable as cancer-specific therapeutic targets.
Related JoVE Video
Co-targeting of the PI3K pathway improves the response of BRCA1 deficient breast cancer cells to PARP1 inhibition.
Cancer Lett.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although pre-clinical and clinical studies on PARP1 inhibitors, alone and in combination with DNA-damaging agents, show promising results, further ways to improve and broaden the scope of application of this therapeutic approach are warranted. To this end, we have investigated the possibility of improving the response of BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells to PARP1 inhibition by co-targeting the PI3K pathway. Human breast cancer cell lines with or without the expression of BRCA1 and/or PTEN were treated with PARP1 and PI3K inhibitors as single agents and in combination. PARP1 inhibition induced DNA damage conferring a G2/M arrest and decrease in viability, paralleled by the induction of apoptosis. PI3K inhibition alone caused a G1 arrest and decreased cell growth. Most importantly, sequential combination of PARP and PI3K inhibitors interacted synergistically to significantly decrease growth compared to PARP inhibition alone. Global transcriptional profiling revealed that this decrease in growth was associated with down-regulation of macromolecule biosynthesis and the induction of apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest an improved treatment strategy for BRCA1-mutant and possibly also triple-negative breast cancers with similar molecular defects.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.