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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.
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Pathogenic Neisseria hitchhike on the uropod of human neutrophils.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2011
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Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are important components of the human innate immune system and are rapidly recruited at the site of bacterial infection. Despite the effective phagocytic activity of PMNs, Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections are characterized by high survival within PMNs. We reveal a novel type IV pilus-mediated adherence of pathogenic Neisseria to the uropod (the rear) of polarized PMNs. The direct pilus-uropod interaction was visualized by scanning electron microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We showed that N. meningitidis adhesion to the PMN uropod depended on both pilus-associated proteins PilC1 and PilC2, while N. gonorrhoeae adhesion did not. Bacterial adhesion elicited accumulation of the complement regulator CD46, but not I-domain-containing integrins, beneath the adherent bacterial microcolony. Electrographs and live-cell imaging of PMNs suggested that bacterial adherence to the uropod is followed by internalization into PMNs via the uropod. We also present data showing that pathogenic Neisseria can hitchhike on PMNs to hide from their phagocytic activity as well as to facilitate the spread of the pathogen through the epithelial cell layer.
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Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection induces altered amphiregulin processing and release.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2011
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Adhesion of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae has established effects on the host cell and evokes a variety of cellular events including growth factor activation. In the present study we report that infection with N. gonorrhoeae causes altered amphiregulin processing and release in human epithelial cells. Amphiregulin is a well-studied growth factor with functions in various cell processes and is upregulated in different forms cancer and proliferative diseases. The protein is prototypically cleaved on the cell surface in response to external stimuli. We demonstrate that upon infection, a massive upregulation of amphiregulin mRNA is seen. The protein changes its subcellular distribution and is also alternatively cleaved at the plasma membrane, which results in augmented release of an infection-specific 36 kDa amphiregulin product from the surface of human cervical epithelial cells. Further, using antibodies directed against different domains of the protein we could determine the impact of infection on pro-peptide processing. In summary, we present data showing that the infection of N. gonorrhoeae causes an alternative amphiregulin processing, subcellular distribution and release in human epithelial cervical cells that likely contribute to the predisposition cellular abnormalities and anti-apoptotic features of N. gonorrhoeae infections.
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The complement regulator CD46 is bactericidal to Helicobacter pylori and blocks urease activity.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2011
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CD46 is a C3b/C4b binding complement regulator and a receptor for several human pathogens. We examined the interaction between CD46 and Helicobacter pylori (a bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and causes gastritis), peptic ulcers, and cancer.
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Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection causes DNA damage and affects the expression of p21, p27 and p53 in non-tumor epithelial cells.
J. Cell. Sci.
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The constant shedding and renewal of epithelial cells maintain the protection of epithelial barriers. Interference with the processes of host cell-cycle regulation and barrier integrity permits the bacterial pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae to effectively colonize and invade epithelial cells. Here, we show that a gonococcal infection causes DNA damage in human non-tumor vaginal VK2/E6E7 cells with an increase of 700 DNA strand breaks per cell per hour as detected by an alkaline DNA unwinding assay. Infected cells exhibited elevated levels of DNA double-strand breaks, as indicated by a more than 50% increase in cells expressing DNA damage-response protein 53BP1-positive foci that co-localized with phosphorylated histone H2AX (?H2AX). Furthermore, infected cells abolished their expression of the tumor protein p53 and induced an increase in the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27 to 2.6-fold and 4.2-fold of controls, respectively. As shown by live-cell microscopy, flow cytometry assays, and BrdU incorporation assays, gonococcal infection slowed the host cell-cycle progression mainly by impairing progression through the G2 phase. Our findings show new cellular players that are involved in the control of the human cell cycle during gonococcal infection and the potential of bacteria to cause cellular abnormalities.
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N-Acyl taurines trigger insulin secretion by increasing calcium flux in pancreatic ?-cells.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
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Pancreatic ?-cells secrete insulin in response to various stimuli to control blood glucose levels. This insulin release is the result of a complex interplay between signaling, membrane potential and intracellular calcium levels. Various nutritional and hormonal factors are involved in regulating this process. N-Acyl taurines are a group of fatty acids which are amidated (or conjugated) to taurine and little is known about their physiological functions. In this study, treatment of pancreatic ?-cell lines (HIT-T15) and rat islet cell lines (INS-1) with N-acyl taurines (N-arachidonoyl taurine and N-oleoyl taurine), induced a high frequency of calcium oscillations in these cells. Treatment with N-arachidonoyl taurine and N-oleoyl taurine also resulted in a significant increase in insulin secretion from pancreatic ?-cell lines as determined by insulin release assay and immunofluorescence (p<0.05). Our data also show that the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in insulin secretion in response to N-arachidonoyl taurine and N-oleoyl taurine treatment. However our data also suggest that receptors other than TRPV1 are involved in the insulin secretion response to treatment with N-oleoyl taurine.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.