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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
HIV Type 1 Subtype BF Leads to Faster CD4(+) T Cell Loss Compared to Subtype B.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 09-06-2013
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Abstract Although it has been suggested that biological differences among HIV-1 subtypes exist, their possible influence on disease progression has not been fully revealed. In particular, the increasing emergence of recombinants stresses the need to characterize disease presentation in persons infected by these diverse HIV-1 forms. We explored this issue among 83 Brazilian subjects infected with either HIV-1 subtype B or recombinant subtype BF, all followed since incident infection in a cohort study. Viral subtypes were assigned by full length sequencing of HIV-1 genomes. We observed that the baseline measures for CD4(+) T cells and viral load did not differ between the groups. However, longitudinal analysis revealed that subtype BF was clearly associated with a faster CD4(+) T cell decline compared to infection with subtype B, in spite of a similar plasma HIV-1 load. While subtype B-infected subjects presented a loss of 3.6 CD4(+) T cells/?l per month, subtype BF-infected individuals showed a monthly decay of 6.3 CD4(+) T cells/?l (p<0.01). The time to reach 350 CD4(+) T cells/?l and the time to start antiretroviral treatment were also shorter in subtype BF-infected persons. The elucidation of an accelerated CD4(+) T cell loss associated with subtype BF suggests that this HIV-1 genetic form could be more pathogenic than subtype B.
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Characterization of partial and near full-length genomes of HIV-1 strains sampled from recently infected individuals in São Paulo, Brazil.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Genetic variability is a major feature of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and is considered the key factor frustrating efforts to halt the HIV epidemic. A proper understanding of HIV-1 genomic diversity is a fundamental prerequisite for proper epidemiology, genetic diagnosis, and successful drugs and vaccines design. Here, we report on the partial and near full-length genomic (NFLG) variability of HIV-1 isolates from a well-characterized cohort of recently infected patients in São Paul, Brazil.
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Unexpected diversity of cellular immune responses against Nef and Vif in HIV-1-infected patients who spontaneously control viral replication.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2010
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HIV-1-infected individuals who spontaneously control viral replication represent an example of successful containment of the AIDS virus. Understanding the anti-viral immune responses in these individuals may help in vaccine design. However, immune responses against HIV-1 are normally analyzed using HIV-1 consensus B 15-mers that overlap by 11 amino acids. Unfortunately, this method may underestimate the real breadth of the cellular immune responses against the autologous sequence of the infecting virus.
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GB virus type C infection modulates T-cell activation independently of HIV-1 viral load.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2009
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Many clinical studies have suggested a beneficial effect of GB virus type C (GBV-C) on the course of HIV-1 infection, but the mechanisms involved in such amelioration are not clear. As recent evidence has implicated cellular activation in HIV-1 pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of GBV-C viremia on T-cell activation in early HIV-1 infection.
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Clinical correlations of human cytomegalovirus strains and viral load in kidney transplant recipients.
Int. Immunopharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2009
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Little is known about clinical differences associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection by distinct strains in renal transplant patients. Different clinical pictures may be associated with specific viral genotypes, viral load, as well as host factors. The objective of this study was to identify CMV strains to determine viral load (antigenemia), and their correlation with clinical data in renal transplant recipients. Seventy-one patients were enrolled, comprising 91 samples. After selection, polymorphonuclear cells were used to amplify and sequence the gB region of CMV DNA. The sequences were analyzed to ascertain the frequency of different genotypes. Additionally, the results of this study showed that the gB coding gene presents a great variability, revealing a variety of patterns: classical gB1 (1.4%), gB1V (46.4%), classical gB2 (35.2%), gB2V (2.8%), gB3 (1.4%), classical gB4 (4.9%) and gB4V (4.9%). The mean viral load in kidney transplant patient was 75.1 positive cells (1-1000). A higher viral load was observed in patients with genotype 4 infection. Statistically significant differences were detected between gB1 and gB4 (p=0.010), and between gB2 and gB4 (p=0.021). The average numbers of positive cells in relation to clinical presentation were: 34.5 in asymptomatic, 49.5 in CMV associated syndrome and 120.7 in patients with invasive disease (p=0.048). As a group, gB1 was the most frequent strain and revealed a potential risk for developing invasive disease. Viral load also seemed to be important as a marker associated with clinical presentation of the disease.
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High human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) prevalence, clinical correlates and high incidence among recently HIV-1-infected subjects in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2009
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Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is the etiological agent for Kaposi Sarcoma, which occurs especially in HIV-infected subjects. HHV-8 infection and its clinical correlates have not been well characterized in recently HIV-1-infected subjects, especially men who have sex with men (MSM).
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Frequency of subtype B and F1 dual infection in HIV-1 positive, Brazilian men who have sex with men.
Virol. J.
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Because various HIV vaccination studies are in progress, it is important to understand how often inter- and intra-subtype co/superinfection occurs in different HIV-infected high-risk groups. This knowledge would aid in the development of future prevention programs. In this cross-sectional study, we report the frequency of subtype B and F1 co-infection in a clinical group of 41 recently HIV-1 infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in São Paulo, Brazil.
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Faster HIV-1 disease progression among Brazilian individuals recently infected with CXCR4-utilizing strains.
PLoS ONE
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Primary HIV infection is usually caused by R5 viruses, and there is an association between the emergence of CCXR4-utilizing strains and faster disease progression. We characterized HIV-1 from a cohort of recently infected individuals in Brazil, predicted the viruss co-receptor use based on the env genotype and attempted to correlate virus profiles with disease progression.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.