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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Causes of Missed Referrals to Low-Vision Rehabilitation Services: Causes in a Tertiary Eye Care Setting.
Semin Ophthalmol
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2014
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Abstract Purpose: To identify the referral pattern and identify causes of missed referrals to low-vision services in a tertiary eye care center. Methods: A retrospective review of all the hospital records of patients seen from September-December 2012 was done to identify patients with visual impairment. Low vision was defined as has a best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in the better eye of <20/60 to light perception (as per WHO definition); or a visual field of <20° from the point of fixation. The frequency of referrals in this database was used to identify referral patterns of physicians and also causes for missed referrals for these patients. Results: Of 14,938 hospital medical records reviewed during the period, 499 patients missed low-vision services with a mean age of 46?±?18.2 years, including 158 females. Among those missed, 12.07% were in the age group 0-15 years, while 30.9% of the patients were >60 years, with 157 requiring rehabilitative services and training. Causes for missed referrals were clear misses or non-referrals by the physician (39%), non-acceptance of services by the patient (53%), loss from appointment desks (4.5%), and loss to follow-up (3.5%). Conclusion: Missed referral to low-vision services in tertiary centers can be considerable; these need to be identified for optimal utilization and delivery of these services to patients with low vision.
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The role of TLR9 polymorphism in susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis.
Immunogenetics
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2014
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the causative agent of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), a major health problem that leads to 1.5 million deaths annually. Host genetic factors play a significant role in disease resistance/susceptibility by altering immunity against MTB. Toll-like receptor (TLR) sensors such as TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, and TLR9 are known to play a pivotal role in PTB via modulating sensor expression and/or effector responses. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs187084 (T-1486C) of the TLR9 promoter is associated with various autoimmune disorders and cancers. A recent bioinformatic analysis predicted that the T-1486C SNP is involved in PTB, although its potential role is unclear. To investigate the role of T-1486C in PTB, we stimulated PBMCs with the H37Rv whole cell lysate. We found that the presence of the "C" allele increases the transcriptional activity of the TLR9, which in turn induces high levels of Interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), a biomarker for PTB. However, the expression of protective cytokines such as IFN? and TNF? was observed significantly less with "C" allele in comparison to "T" allele. We further selected three different tribe populations showing differential susceptibility to PTB and performed genotypic analyses for the TLR9 promoter. We found a significantly lower minor allele frequency (MAF) of T-1486C in the Baiga tribe, wherein fewer PTB cases were reported, than that in the Gond and Korku tribes. Collectively, these data suggest that the minor "C" allele at rs187084 locus may be associated with susceptibility to PTB, which may explain the relatively lower PTB rates observed in Baiga tribe members.
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Removal of paralytic shellfish toxins by probiotic lactic acid bacteria.
Toxins (Basel)
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2014
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Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms) to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX), neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3), C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2)) from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2) was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%-97.2%) was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%-49.7%). There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo.
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In vitro antibacterial activity of Tabernaemontana alternifolia (Roxb) stem bark aqueous extracts against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
Ann. Clin. Microbiol. Antimicrob.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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The rise of antibiotic resistance among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), have caused concerns for the treatment of MRSA infections. Hence, search for an alternative therapy for these infections is inevitable. Folk Indian medicine refers to the use of leaf and stem bark powder of Tabernaemontana alternifolia (Roxb) in treatment of skin infections, but no scientific report establishes its antibacterial activity.
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Poly IC triggers a cathepsin D- and IPS-1-dependent pathway to enhance cytokine production and mediate dendritic cell necroptosis.
Immunity
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2013
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RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) sense virus-derived RNA or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC) to exert antiviral immune responses. Here, we examine the mechanisms underlying the adjuvant effects of poly IC. Poly IC was taken up by dendritic cells (DCs), and it induced lysosomal destabilization, which, in turn, activated an RLR-dependent signaling pathway. Upon poly IC stimulation, cathepsin D was released into the cytoplasm from the lysosome to interact with IPS-1, an adaptor molecule for RLRs. This interaction facilitated cathepsin D cleavage of caspase 8 and the activation of the transcription factor NF-?B, resulting in enhanced cytokine production. Further recruitment of the kinase RIP-1 to this complex initiated the necroptosis of a small number of DCs. HMGB1 released by dying cells enhanced IFN-? production in concert with poly IC. Collectively, these findings suggest that cathepsin D-triggered, IPS-1-dependent necroptosis is a mechanism that propagates the adjuvant efficacy of poly IC.
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Innate immune recognition mechanisms and translational opportunities.
Int. Rev. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2013
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Innate immune sensors are a family of receptors which play a pivotal role in immune surveillance in various cellular compartments, recognizing numerous motifs derived from pathogens or associated with altered self molecules. Sensing of pathogenic components of self or nonself origin leads to a variety of integrated responses such as induction of proinflammatory and antiviral cytokines and lipid mediators, as well as upregulation of costimulatory molecules on a variety of cells. Furthermore, these sensors play a crucial role in cell survival, autophagy and pluripotency, and therefore, they are essential for the maintenance of cellular metabolic homeostasis. Finally, these sensors also play a substantial role in elicitation of specific immune responses, deploying and regulating the development of appropriate adaptive immunity against pathogens. This issue focuses on the biology of innate immune sensors, particularly Toll-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors, mutations in such sensors and/or their signaling components associated with disorders and the role of innate immune sensors in the mechanism of response to particulate vaccine adjuvants.
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Sweeten PAMPs: Role of Sugar Complexed PAMPs in Innate Immunity and Vaccine Biology.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Innate sensors play a critical role in the early innate immune responses to invading pathogens through sensing of diverse biochemical signatures also known as pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). These biochemical signatures primarily consist of a major family of biomolecules such as proteins, lipids, nitrogen bases, and sugar and its complexes, which are distinct from host molecules and exclusively expressed in pathogens and essential to their survival. The family of sensors known as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are germ-line encoded, evolutionarily conserved molecules, and consist of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), C-type lectin-like receptors (CLRs), and DNA sensors. Sensing of PAMP by PRR initiates the cascade of signaling leading to the activation of transcription factors, such as NF-?B and interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), resulting in a variety of cellular responses, including the production of interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss sensing of different types of glycosylated PAMPs such as ?-glucan (a polymeric sugar) or lipopolysaccharides, nucleic acid, and so on (sugar complex PAMPs) by different families of sensors, its role in pathogenesis, and its application in development of potential vaccine and vaccine adjuvants.
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Lactobacillus plantarum (VR1) isolated from an ayurvedic medicine (Kutajarista) ameliorates in vitro cellular damage caused by Aeromonas veronii.
BMC Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2011
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Lactobacillus plantarum is considered as a safe and effective probiotic microorganism. Among various sources of isolation, traditionally fermented foods are considered to be rich in Lactobacillus spp., which can be exploited for their probiotic attribute. Antibacterial property of L. plantarum has been demonstrated against various enteric pathogens in both in vitro and in vivo systems. This study was aimed at characterizing L. plantarum isolated from Kutajarista, an ayurvedic fermented biomedicine, and assessing its antagonistic property against a common enteropathogen Aeromonas veronii.
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Viral infection augments Nod1/2 signaling to potentiate lethality associated with secondary bacterial infections.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2011
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Secondary bacterial infection is a common sequela to viral infection and is associated with increased lethality and morbidity. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We show that the TLR3/MDA5 agonist poly I:C or viral infection dramatically augments signaling via the NLRs Nod1 and Nod2 and enhances the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Enhanced Nod1 and Nod2 signaling by poly I:C required the TLR3/MDA5 adaptors TRIF and IPS-1 and was mediated by type I IFNs. Mechanistically, poly I:C or IFN-? induced the expression of Nod1, Nod2, and the Nod-signaling adaptor Rip2. Systemic administration of poly I:C or IFN-? or infection with murine norovirus-1 promoted inflammation and lethality in mice superinfected with E. coli, which was independent of bacterial burden but attenuated in the absence of Nod1/Nod2 or Rip2. Thus, crosstalk between type I IFNs and Nod1/Nod2 signaling promotes bacterial recognition, but induces harmful effects in the virally infected host.
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Pathogen recognition by the innate immune system.
Int. Rev. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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Microbial infection initiates complex interactions between the pathogen and the host. Pathogens express several signature molecules, known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are essential for survival and pathogenicity. PAMPs are sensed by evolutionarily conserved, germline-encoded host sensors known as pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs). Recognition of PAMPs by PRRs rapidly triggers an array of anti-microbial immune responses through the induction of various inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and type I interferons. These responses also initiate the development of pathogen-specific, long-lasting adaptive immunity through B and T lymphocytes. Several families of PRRs, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), and DNA receptors (cytosolic sensors for DNA), are known to play a crucial role in host defense. In this review, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the field of PAMP recognition by PRRs and the signaling pathways activated by PRRs.
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NLRC5 deficiency does not influence cytokine induction by virus and bacteria infections.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2010
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Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing gene family receptors (NLRs) are cytosolic proteins that respond to a variety of pathogen and host components to induce inflammatory cytokines. NLRC5 is a recently identified member of the NLR family that has been implicated in positive and negative regulation of antiviral innate immune responses. To clarify whether NLRC5 controls antiviral innate immunity in vivo, we generated NLRC5-deficient mice. Macrophages and dendritic cells derived from NLRC5-deficient mice induced relatively normal levels of IFN-?, IL-6, and TNF-? after treatment with RNA viruses, DNA viruses, and bacteria. The serum cytokine levels after polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid infection were also comparable between control and NLRC5-deficient mice. NLRC5 overexpression promoted IL-1? production via caspase-1, suggesting that NLRC5 constitutes an inflammasome. However, there was no reduction of IL-1? in NLRC5-deficient cells in response to known inflammasome activators, suggesting that NLRC5 controls IL-1? production through an unidentified pathway. These findings indicate that NLRC5 is dispensable for cytokine induction in virus and bacterial infections under physiologic conditions.
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The ubiquitin ligase TRIM56 regulates innate immune responses to intracellular double-stranded DNA.
Immunity
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2010
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The innate immune system detects pathogen- and host-derived double-stranded DNA exposed to the cytosol and induces type I interferon (IFN) and other cytokines. Here, we identified interferon-inducible tripartite-motif (TRIM) 56 as a regulator of double-stranded DNA-mediated type I interferon induction. TRIM56 overexpression enhanced IFN-? promoter activation after double-stranded DNA stimulation whereas TRIM56 knockdown abrogated it. TRIM56 interacted with STING and targeted it for lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. This modification induced STING dimerization, which was a prerequisite for recruitment of the antiviral kinase TBK1 and subsequent induction of IFN-?. Taken together, these results indicate that TRIM56 is an interferon-inducible E3 ubiquitin ligase that modulates STING to confer double-stranded DNA-mediated innate immune responses.
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Involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome in innate and humoral adaptive immune responses to fungal beta-glucan.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2009
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Fungal beta-glucan, such as curdlan, triggers antifungal innate immune responses as well as shaping adaptive immune responses. In this study, we identified a key pathway that couples curdlan to immune responses. Curdlan promoted the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta by dendritic cells and macrophages through the NLRP3 inflammasome. Stimulation with Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae also triggered the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1beta production. In vivo, NLRP3 was required for efficient Ag-specific Ab production when curdlan was used as an adjuvant, whereas it was dispensable for the induction of Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation. Furthermore, stimulation of purified B cells with curdlan-induced CD69 up-regulation and IgM production while stimulation with other NLRP3 inflammasome activators, such as silica and aluminum salt, did not. Notably, this induction required NLRP3 but was independent of Toll-like receptor and IL-1 receptor family signaling, suggesting the presence of NLRP3-dependent and IL-1 receptor family independent mechanisms in B cells responsible for Ab responses. Collectively, these findings reveal a critical role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in the regulation of antifungal innate immune responses as well as B cell activation.
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Toll-like receptors and innate immunity.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2009
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Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved innate receptors expressed in various immune and non-immune cells of the mammalian host. TLRs play a crucial role in defending against pathogenic microbial infection through the induction of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons. Furthermore, TLRs also play roles in shaping pathogen-specific humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. In this review, we describe the recent advances in pathogen recognition by TLRs and TLR signaling.
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Poly I:C-induced activation of NK cells by CD8 alpha+ dendritic cells via the IPS-1 and TRIF-dependent pathways.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2009
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NK cells play essential roles in eliminating virally infected cells and tumor cells. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a double-stranded RNA analog recognized by melanoma-differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5) and TLR3, activates NK cells in vivo. MDA5 and TLR3 signal through distinct adaptor molecules, IFN-promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1) and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF), respectively. However, it remains unclear how NK cells are activated by poly I:C in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that the IPS-1-dependent and the TRIF-dependent pathways are essential for NK cell activation to poly I:C stimulation in mice, whereas deficiency in either IPS-1 or TRIF only modestly impairs the poly I:C-induced NK cell activation. Furthermore, both IPS-1 and TRIF contributed to suppression of implanted B16 tumor growth in response to poly I:C administration via NK cell activation. Presence of IPS-1 and TRIF in dendritic cells (DCs), but not NK cells, was required for production of IFN-gamma to poly I:C in NK cells in vitro. Moreover CD8alpha(+) conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), but not CD8alpha(-) cDCs, expressed genes for type I IFNs, IL-6, and IL-12p40 in response to poly I:C stimulation, and were also responsible for inducing IFN-gamma production in NK cells. Taken together, poly I:C activates the IPS-1- and TRIF-dependent pathways in CD8alpha(+) cDCs, which in turn leads to NK cell activation.
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Pathogen recognition in the innate immune response.
Biochem. J.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2009
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Immunity against microbial pathogens primarily depends on the recognition of pathogen components by innate receptors expressed on immune and non-immune cells. Innate receptors are evolutionarily conserved germ-line-encoded proteins and include TLRs (Toll-like receptors), RLRs [RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I)-like receptors] and NLRs (Nod-like receptors). These receptors recognize pathogens or pathogen-derived products in different cellular compartments, such as the plasma membrane, the endosomes or the cytoplasm, and induce the expression of cytokines, chemokines and co-stimulatory molecules to eliminate pathogens and instruct pathogen-specific adaptive immune responses. In the present review, we will discuss the recent progress in the study of pathogen recognition by TLRs, RLRs and NLRs and their signalling pathways.
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Cutting Edge: TLR-Dependent viral recognition along with type I IFN positive feedback signaling masks the requirement of viral replication for IFN-{alpha} production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2009
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Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) recognize RNA virus infection via TLRs and consequently produce vast amounts of type I IFN. Because nucleic acid-sensing TLRs reside in the intracellular membrane compartment, it is presumable that pDCs do not require cytoplasmic viral replication to recognize the infection. By checking Newcastle disease virus (NDV) RNA abundance in GFP(+) and GFP(-) pDCs from Ifna6gfp mice, we found that NDV replication was not detected in IFN-producing pDCs. GFP(+) pDC was induced in response to replication-incompetent NDV. In contrast, the replication-incompetent NDV failed to induce IFN-producing pDCs in type I IFNR-deficient mice. The lack of IFNR signaling led to the replication of NDV and the subsequent RIG-I-like helicase-dependent IFN-alpha production in pDCs. These results showed that detection of viruses via TLRs together with a type I IFN feedback system circumvents the requirement for viral replication-dependent recognition in pDCs.
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Microbial community structure at different fermentation stages of kutajarista, a herbal formulation.
Indian J. Microbiol.
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Kutajarista is an Ayurvedic fermented herbal formulation prescribed for gastrointestinal disorders. This herbal formulation undergoes a gradual fermentative process and takes around 2 months for production. In this study, microbial composition at initial stages of fermentation of Kutajarista was assessed by culture independent 16S rRNA gene clone library approach. Physicochemical changes were also compared at these stages of fermentation. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that Gallic acid, Ellagic acid, and its derivatives were the major chemical constituents recovered in this process. At 0 day of fermentation, Lactobacillus sp., Acinetobacter sp., Alcaligenes sp., and Methylobacterium sp. were recovered, but were not detected at 8 day of fermentation. Initially, microbial diversity increased after 8 days of fermentation with 11 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), which further decreased to 3 OTUs at 30 day of fermentation. Aeromonas sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Klebsiella sp. dominated till 30 day of fermentation. Predominance of ?- Proteobacteria and presence of gallolyl derivatives at the saturation stage of fermentation implies tannin degrading potential of these microbes. This is the first study to highlight the microbial role in an Ayurvedic herbal product fermentation.
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Comparative analysis of fecal microflora of healthy full-term Indian infants born with different methods of delivery (vaginal vs cesarean): Acinetobacter sp. prevalence in vaginally born infants.
J. Biosci.
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In this study fecal microflora of human infants born through vaginal delivery (VB) and through cesarean section (CB) were investigated using culture-independent 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing approach. The results obtained clearly revealed that fecal microbiota of VB infants distinctly differ from those in their counterpart CB infants. The intestinal microbiota of infants delivered by cesarean section appears to be more diverse, in terms of bacteria species, than the microbiota of vaginally delivered infants. The most abundant bacterial species present in VB infants were Acinetobacter sp., Bifidobacterium sp. and Staphylococcus sp. However, CB infants fecal microbiota was dominated with Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile. The intestinal microbiota of cesarean section delivered infants in this study was also characterized by an absence of Bifidobacteria species. An interesting finding of our study was recovery of large number of Acinetobacter sp. consisting of Acinetobacter pittii (former Acinetobacter genomic species 3), Acinetobacter junii and Acinetobacter baumannii in the VB infants clone library. Among these, Acinetobacter baumannii is a known nosocomial pathogen and Acinetobacter pittii (genomic species 3) is recently recognized as clinically important taxa within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex. Although none of the infants had shown any sign of clinical symptoms of disease, this observation warrants a closer look.
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Recognition of bacterial infection by innate immune sensors.
Crit. Rev. Microbiol.
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Microbial challenges to the host initiate an array of defense processes through the activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity consists of sensors or pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that are expressed on immune and non-immune cells and sense conserved pathogen-derived molecules or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in various compartments of the host cells. Recognition of the PAMPs by PRRs triggers antimicrobial effector responses via the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. Several families of PRRs, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), and DNA sensors and their respective PAMPs have been well studied in innate immunity and host defense. Here, we review the recent findings on bacterial recognition by TLRs and NLRs and the signaling pathways activated by these sensors.
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Antioxidative potential of lactobacilli isolated from the gut of Indian people.
Mol. Biol. Rep.
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Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of degenerative conditions occurring at cellular level with serious health implications. This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidative potentials of probiotic lactobacilli of Indian gut origin and their ability to augment antioxidant defense enzyme systems in the host cells under oxidative stress conditions. A total of 39 Lactobacillus cultures were assessed for their resistance against reactive oxygen species. Most of the cultures were moderately to strongly resistant towards 0.4 mM H(2)O(2). The Lactobacillus isolate CH4 was the most H(2)O(2) resistant culture with only 0.06 log cycle reduction. Majority of the cultures demonstrated high resistance towards hydroxyl ions and Lp21 was the most resistant with log count reduction of 0.20 fold only. Almost all the cultures were also quite resistant to superoxide anions. Lp21 also showed the highest superoxide dismutase content (0.8971 U). Amongst the 39 cultures, Lactobacillus spp. S3 showed the highest total antioxidative activity of 77.85 ± 0.13 % followed by Lp55 (56.1 ± 1.2 %) in terms of per cent inhibition of linolenic acid oxidation. Lp9 up-regulated the expression of superoxide dismutase 2 gene in HT-29 cells both at 0.1 mM (1.997 folds) and 1.0 mM H(2)O(2) (2.058 folds) concentrations. In case of glutathione peroxidase-1, Lp9, Lp91 and Lp55 showed significant (P < 0.001) up-regulation in the gene expression to the level of 5.451, 8.706 and 10.083 folds, respectively when HT-29 was challenged with 0.1 mM H(2)O(2). The expression of catalase gene was also significantly up-regulated by all the cultures at 0.1 mM H(2)O(2) conditions. It can be concluded that the antioxidative efficacy of the putative probiotic lactobacilli varied considerably between species and strains and the potential strains can be explored as prospective antioxidants to manage oxidative stress induced diseases.
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