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Modeling and simulation using CellDesigner.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2014
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In silico modeling and simulation are effective means to understand how the regulatory systems function in life. In this chapter, we explain how to build a model and run the simulation using CellDesigner, adopting the standards such as SBML and SBGN.
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Disease severity is associated with differential gene expression at the early and late phases of infection in nonhuman primates infected with different H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2014
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Occasional transmission of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses to humans causes severe pneumonia with high mortality. To better understand the mechanisms via which H5N1 viruses induce severe disease in humans, we infected cynomolgus macaques with six different H5N1 strains isolated from human patients and compared their pathogenicity and the global host responses to the virus infection. Although all H5N1 viruses replicated in the respiratory tract, there was substantial heterogeneity in their replicative ability and in the disease severity induced, which ranged from asymptomatic to fatal. A comparison of global gene expression between severe and mild disease cases indicated that interferon-induced upregulation of genes related to innate immunity, apoptosis, and antigen processing/presentation in the early phase of infection was limited in severe disease cases, although interferon expression was upregulated in both severe and mild cases. Furthermore, coexpression analysis of microarray data, which reveals the dynamics of host responses during the infection, demonstrated that the limited expression of these genes early in infection led to a failure to suppress virus replication and to the hyperinduction of genes related to immunity, inflammation, coagulation, and homeostasis in the late phase of infection, resulting in a more severe disease. Our data suggest that the attenuated interferon-induced activation of innate immunity, apoptosis, and antigen presentation in the early phase of H5N1 virus infection leads to subsequent severe disease outcome.
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Integrative knowledge management to enhance pharmaceutical R&D.
Nat Rev Drug Discov
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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Information technologies already have a key role in pharmaceutical research and development (R&D), but achieving substantial advances in their use and effectiveness will depend on overcoming current challenges in sharing, integrating and jointly analysing the range of data generated at different stages of the R&D process.
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Harnessing Diversity towards the Reconstructing of Large Scale Gene Regulatory Networks.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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Elucidating gene regulatory network (GRN) from large scale experimental data remains a central challenge in systems biology. Recently, numerous techniques, particularly consensus driven approaches combining different algorithms, have become a potentially promising strategy to infer accurate GRNs. Here, we develop a novel consensus inference algorithm, TopkNet that can integrate multiple algorithms to infer GRNs. Comprehensive performance benchmarking on a cloud computing framework demonstrated that (i) a simple strategy to combine many algorithms does not always lead to performance improvement compared to the cost of consensus and (ii) TopkNet integrating only high-performance algorithms provide significant performance improvement compared to the best individual algorithms and community prediction. These results suggest that a priori determination of high-performance algorithms is a key to reconstruct an unknown regulatory network. Similarity among gene-expression datasets can be useful to determine potential optimal algorithms for reconstruction of unknown regulatory networks, i.e., if expression-data associated with known regulatory network is similar to that with unknown regulatory network, optimal algorithms determined for the known regulatory network can be repurposed to infer the unknown regulatory network. Based on this observation, we developed a quantitative measure of similarity among gene-expression datasets and demonstrated that, if similarity between the two expression datasets is high, TopkNet integrating algorithms that are optimal for known dataset perform well on the unknown dataset. The consensus framework, TopkNet, together with the similarity measure proposed in this study provides a powerful strategy towards harnessing the wisdom of the crowds in reconstruction of unknown regulatory networks.
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Toward an integrated software platform for systems pharmacology.
Biopharm Drug Dispos
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2013
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Understanding complex biological systems requires extensive support of computational tools. This is particularly true for systems pharmacology, which aims to understand the action of drugs and their interactions in a systems context. Computational models play important role as they can be viewed as an explicit representation of biological hypotheses to be tested. A series of software and data resources are used for model development, verification, and exploration of possible behaviors of biological systems using the model that may not be possible or not cost effective by experiments. Software platforms play a dominant role in creativity and productivity support and have transformed many industries that can be applied to biology as well. Establishing the software platform shall be the next important step in the field. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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A comprehensive map of the influenza A virus replication cycle.
BMC Syst Biol
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
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Influenza is a common infectious disease caused by influenza viruses. Annual epidemics cause severe illnesses, deaths, and economic loss around the world. To better defend against influenza viral infection, it is essential to understand its mechanisms and associated host responses. Many studies have been conducted to elucidate these mechanisms, however, the overall picture remains incompletely understood. A systematic understanding of influenza viral infection in host cells is needed to facilitate the identification of influential host response mechanisms and potential drug targets.
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Integrating Pathways of Parkinsons Disease in a Molecular Interaction Map.
Mol. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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Parkinsons disease (PD) is a major neurodegenerative chronic disease, most likely caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Information on various aspects of PD pathogenesis is rapidly increasing and needs to be efficiently organized, so that the resulting data is available for exploration and analysis. Here we introduce a computationally tractable, comprehensive molecular interaction map of PD. This map integrates pathways implicated in PD pathogenesis such as synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired protein degradation, alpha-synuclein pathobiology and neuroinflammation. We also present bioinformatics tools for the analysis, enrichment and annotation of the map, allowing the research community to open new avenues in PD research. The PD map is accessible at http://minerva.uni.lu/pd_map .
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Parallel real-time PCR on a chip for genetic tug-of-war (gTOW) method.
Anal Sci
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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A microchip-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device has been developed for the genetic tug-of-war (gTOW) method that provides quantitative data for research on biorobustness and systems biology. The device was constructed of a silicon glass chip, a temperature controlling Peltier element, and a microscope. A parallel real-time amplification process of target genes on the plasmids and the housekeeping genes in a model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae were detected simultaneously, and the copy number of the target genes were estimated. The device provides unique quantitative data that can be used to augment understanding of the system-level properties of living cells.
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Adding protein context to the human protein-protein interaction network to reveal meaningful interactions.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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Interactions of proteins regulate signaling, catalysis, gene expression and many other cellular functions. Therefore, characterizing the entire human interactome is a key effort in current proteomics research. This challenge is complicated by the dynamic nature of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which are conditional on the cellular context: both interacting proteins must be expressed in the same cell and localized in the same organelle to meet. Additionally, interactions underlie a delicate control of signaling pathways, e.g. by post-translational modifications of the protein partners - hence, many diseases are caused by the perturbation of these mechanisms. Despite the high degree of cell-state specificity of PPIs, many interactions are measured under artificial conditions (e.g. yeast cells are transfected with human genes in yeast two-hybrid assays) or even if detected in a physiological context, this information is missing from the common PPI databases. To overcome these problems, we developed a method that assigns context information to PPIs inferred from various attributes of the interacting proteins: gene expression, functional and disease annotations, and inferred pathways. We demonstrate that context consistency correlates with the experimental reliability of PPIs, which allows us to generate high-confidence tissue- and function-specific subnetworks. We illustrate how these context-filtered networks are enriched in bona fide pathways and disease proteins to prove the ability of context-filters to highlight meaningful interactions with respect to various biological questions. We use this approach to study the lung-specific pathways used by the influenza virus, pointing to IRAK1, BHLHE40 and TOLLIP as potential regulators of influenza virus pathogenicity, and to study the signalling pathways that play a role in Alzheimers disease, identifying a pathway involving the altered phosphorylation of the Tau protein. Finally, we provide the annotated human PPI network via a web frontend that allows the construction of context-specific networks in several ways.
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Modeling of Rifampicin-Induced CYP3A4 Activation Dynamics for the Prediction of Clinical Drug-Drug Interactions from In Vitro Data.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Induction of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) expression is often implicated in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDI), as metabolism catalyzed by this enzyme is the dominant route of elimination for many drugs. Although several DDI models have been proposed, none have comprehensively considered the effects of enzyme transcription/translation dynamics on induction-based DDI. Rifampicin is a well-known CYP3A4 inducer, and is commonly used as a positive control for evaluating the CYP3A4 induction potential of test compounds. Herein, we report the compilation of in vitro induction data for CYP3A4 by rifampicin in human hepatocytes, and the transcription/translation model developed for this enzyme using an extended least squares method that can account for inherent inter-individual variability. We also developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for the CYP3A4 inducer and CYP3A4 substrates. Finally, we demonstrated that rifampicin-induced DDI can be predicted with reasonable accuracy, and that a static model can be used to simulate DDI once the blood concentration of the inducer reaches a steady state following repeated dosing. This dynamic PBPK-based DDI model was implemented on a new multi-hierarchical physiology simulation platform named PhysioDesigner.
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Software for systems biology: from tools to integrated platforms.
Nat. Rev. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2011
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Understanding complex biological systems requires extensive support from software tools. Such tools are needed at each step of a systems biology computational workflow, which typically consists of data handling, network inference, deep curation, dynamical simulation and model analysis. In addition, there are now efforts to develop integrated software platforms, so that tools that are used at different stages of the workflow and by different researchers can easily be used together. This Review describes the types of software tools that are required at different stages of systems biology research and the current options that are available for systems biology researchers. We also discuss the challenges and prospects for modelling the effects of genetic changes on physiology and the concept of an integrated platform.
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BioPAX support in CellDesigner.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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BioPAX is a standard language for representing and exchanging models of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels. It is widely used by different pathway databases and genomics data analysis software. Currently, the primary source of BioPAX data is direct exports from the curated pathway databases. It is still uncommon for wet-lab biologists to share and exchange pathway knowledge using BioPAX. Instead, pathways are usually represented as informal diagrams in the literature. In order to encourage formal representation of pathways, we describe a software package that allows users to create pathway diagrams using CellDesigner, a user-friendly graphical pathway-editing tool and save the pathway data in BioPAX Level 3 format.
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Tissue-specific subnetworks and characteristics of publicly available human protein interaction databases.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases are widely used tools to study cellular pathways and networks; however, there are several databases available that still do not account for cell type-specific differences. Here, we evaluated the characteristics of six interaction databases, incorporated tissue-specific gene expression information and finally, investigated if the most popular proteins of scientific literature are involved in good quality interactions.
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A proof of the DBRF-MEGN method, an algorithm for deducing minimum equivalent gene networks.
Source Code Biol Med
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2011
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We previously developed the DBRF-MEGN (difference-based regulation finding-minimum equivalent gene network) method, which deduces the most parsimonious signed directed graphs (SDGs) consistent with expression profiles of single-gene deletion mutants. However, until the present study, we have not presented the details of the methods algorithm or a proof of the algorithm.
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Integrated quantitative analysis of the phosphoproteome and transcriptome in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2010
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Quantitative phosphoproteome and transcriptome analysis of ligand-stimulated MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was performed to understand the mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance at a system level. Phosphoproteome data revealed that WT cells were more enriched with phospho-proteins than tamoxifen-resistant cells after stimulation with ligands. Surprisingly, decreased phosphorylation after ligand perturbation was more common than increased phosphorylation. In particular, 17?-estradiol induced down-regulation in WT cells at a very high rate. 17?-Estradiol and the ErbB ligand heregulin induced almost equal numbers of up-regulated phospho-proteins in WT cells. Pathway and motif activity analyses using transcriptome data additionally suggested that deregulated activation of GSK3? (glycogen-synthase kinase 3?) and MAPK1/3 signaling might be associated with altered activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein and AP-1 transcription factors in tamoxifen-resistant cells, and this hypothesis was validated by reporter assays. An examination of clinical samples revealed that inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3? at serine 9 was significantly lower in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients that eventually had relapses, implying that activation of GSK3? may be associated with the tamoxifen-resistant phenotype. Thus, the combined phosphoproteome and transcriptome data set analyses revealed distinct signal transcription programs in tumor cells and provided a novel molecular target to understand tamoxifen resistance.
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Connecting the dots: role of standardization and technology sharing in biological simulation.
Drug Discov. Today
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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The role of biological modeling and simulation in enhancing productivity across the drug discovery pipeline has been increasingly appreciated over the past decade by the pharmaceutical industry. However, adoption of in silico modeling and simulation techniques has been sparse due to skepticism in the associated pay-offs and knowledge gap in research. While biological simulations have been successfully applied in specific projects, a standardized, community-wide platform is imperative for making the final leap of faith across the domain. This review outlines the issues and challenges involved in fostering a private-public collaborative effort for the development of standard modeling and biosimulation platforms and concludes with insights into possible mechanisms for integrating an in silico pipeline into the drug discovery and development process.
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A comprehensive molecular interaction map of the budding yeast cell cycle.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2010
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With the accumulation of data on complex molecular machineries coordinating cell-cycle dynamics, coupled with its central function in disease patho-physiologies, it is becoming increasingly important to collate the disparate knowledge sources into a comprehensive molecular network amenable to systems-level analyses. In this work, we present a comprehensive map of the budding yeast cell-cycle, curating reactions from ?600 original papers. Toward leveraging the map as a framework to explore the underlying network architecture, we abstract the molecular components into three planes--signaling, cell-cycle core and structural planes. The planar view together with topological analyses facilitates network-centric identification of functions and control mechanisms. Further, we perform a comparative motif analysis to identify around 194 motifs including feed-forward, mutual inhibitory and feedback mechanisms contributing to cell-cycle robustness. We envisage the open access, comprehensive cell-cycle map to open roads toward community-based deeper understanding of cell-cycle dynamics.
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A comprehensive map of the mTOR signaling network.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2010
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The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. mTOR signaling is frequently dysregulated in oncogenic cells, and thus an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Using CellDesigner, a modeling support software for graphical notation, we present herein a comprehensive map of the mTOR signaling network, which includes 964 species connected by 777 reactions. The map complies with both the systems biology markup language (SBML) and graphical notation (SBGN) for computational analysis and graphical representation, respectively. As captured in the mTOR map, we review and discuss our current understanding of the mTOR signaling network and highlight the impact of mTOR feedback and crosstalk regulations on drug-based cancer therapy. This map is available on the Payao platform, a Web 2.0 based community-wide interactive process for creating more accurate and information-rich databases. Thus, this comprehensive map of the mTOR network will serve as a tool to facilitate systems-level study of up-to-date mTOR network components and signaling events toward the discovery of novel regulatory processes and therapeutic strategies for cancer.
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PathText: a text mining integrator for biological pathway visualizations.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2010
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Motivation: Metabolic and signaling pathways are an increasingly important part of organizing knowledge in systems biology. They serve to integrate collective interpretations of facts scattered throughout literature. Biologists construct a pathway by reading a large number of articles and interpreting them as a consistent network, but most of the models constructed currently lack direct links to those articles. Biologists who want to check the original articles have to spend substantial amounts of time to collect relevant articles and identify the sections relevant to the pathway. Furthermore, with the scientific literature expanding by several thousand papers per week, keeping a model relevant requires a continuous curation effort. In this article, we present a system designed to integrate a pathway visualizer, text mining systems and annotation tools into a seamless environment. This will enable biologists to freely move between parts of a pathway and relevant sections of articles, as well as identify relevant papers from large text bases. The system, PathText, is developed by Systems Biology Institute, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, National Centre for Text Mining (University of Manchester) and the University of Tokyo, and is being used by groups of biologists from these locations.
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Large-scale analysis of network bistability for human cancers.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2010
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Protein-protein interaction and gene regulatory networks are likely to be locked in a state corresponding to a disease by the behavior of one or more bistable circuits exhibiting switch-like behavior. Sets of genes could be over-expressed or repressed when anomalies due to disease appear, and the circuits responsible for this over- or under-expression might persist for as long as the disease state continues. This paper shows how a large-scale analysis of network bistability for various human cancers can identify genes that can potentially serve as drug targets or diagnosis biomarkers.
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Violations of robustness trade-offs.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2010
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Biological robustness is a principle that may shed light on system-level characteristics of biological systems. One intriguing aspect of the concept of biological robustness is the possible existence of intrinsic trade-offs among robustness, fragility, performance, and so on. At the same time, whether such trade-offs hold regardless of the situation or hold only under specific conditions warrants careful investigation. In this paper, we reassess this concept and argue that biological robustness may hold only when a system is sufficiently optimized and that it may not be conserved when there is room for optimization in its design. Several testable predictions and implications for cell culture experiments are presented.
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Payao: a community platform for SBML pathway model curation.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
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Payao is a community-based, collaborative web service platform for gene-regulatory and biochemical pathway model curation. The system combines Web 2.0 technologies and online model visualization functions to enable a collaborative community to annotate and curate biological models. Payao reads the models in Systems Biology Markup Language format, displays them with CellDesigner, a process diagram editor, which complies with the Systems Biology Graphical Notation, and provides an interface for model enrichment (adding tags and comments to the models) for the access-controlled community members. Availability and implementation: Freely available for model curation service at http://www.payaologue.org. Web site implemented in Seaser Framework 2.0 with S2Flex2, MySQL 5.0 and Tomcat 5.5, with all major browsers supported.
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Fragilities caused by dosage imbalance in regulation of the budding yeast cell cycle.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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Cells can maintain their functions despite fluctuations in intracellular parameters, such as protein activities and gene expression levels. This commonly observed biological property of cells is called robustness. On the other hand, these parameters have different limitations, each reflecting the property of the subsystem containing the parameter. The budding yeast cell cycle is quite fragile upon overexpression of CDC14, but is robust upon overexpression of ESP1. The gene products of both CDC14 and ESP1 are regulated by 1ratio1 binding with their inhibitors (Net1 and Pds1), and a mathematical model predicts the extreme fragility of the cell cycle upon overexpression of CDC14 and ESP1 caused by dosage imbalance between these genes. However, it has not been experimentally shown that dosage imbalance causes fragility of the cell cycle. In this study, we measured the quantitative genetic interactions of these genes by performing combinatorial "genetic tug-of-war" experiments. We first showed experimental evidence that dosage imbalance between CDC14 and NET1 causes fragility. We also showed that fragility arising from dosage imbalance between ESP1 and PDS1 is masked by CDH1 and CLB2. The masking function of CLB2 was stabilization of Pds1 by its phosphorylation. We finally modified Chens model according to our findings. We thus propose that dosage imbalance causes fragility in biological systems.
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Visualization of omics data for systems biology.
Nat. Methods
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2010
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High-throughput studies of biological systems are rapidly accumulating a wealth of omics-scale data. Visualization is a key aspect of both the analysis and understanding of these data, and users now have many visualization methods and tools to choose from. The challenge is to create clear, meaningful and integrated visualizations that give biological insight, without being overwhelmed by the intrinsic complexity of the data. In this review, we discuss how visualization tools are being used to help interpret protein interaction, gene expression and metabolic profile data, and we highlight emerging new directions.
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The Systems Biology Graphical Notation.
Nat. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2009
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Circuit diagrams and Unified Modeling Language diagrams are just two examples of standard visual languages that help accelerate work by promoting regularity, removing ambiguity and enabling software tool support for communication of complex information. Ironically, despite having one of the highest ratios of graphical to textual information, biology still lacks standard graphical notations. The recent deluge of biological knowledge makes addressing this deficit a pressing concern. Toward this goal, we present the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), a visual language developed by a community of biochemists, modelers and computer scientists. SBGN consists of three complementary languages: process diagram, entity relationship diagram and activity flow diagram. Together they enable scientists to represent networks of biochemical interactions in a standard, unambiguous way. We believe that SBGN will foster efficient and accurate representation, visualization, storage, exchange and reuse of information on all kinds of biological knowledge, from gene regulation, to metabolism, to cellular signaling.
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Structure of protein interaction networks and their implications on drug design.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2009
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Protein-protein interaction networks (PINs) are rich sources of information that enable the network properties of biological systems to be understood. A study of the topological and statistical properties of budding yeast and human PINs revealed that they are scale-rich and configured as highly optimized tolerance (HOT) networks that are similar to the router-level topology of the Internet. This is different from claims that such networks are scale-free and configured through simple preferential-attachment processes. Further analysis revealed that there are extensive interconnections among middle-degree nodes that form the backbone of the networks. Degree distributions of essential genes, synthetic lethal genes, synthetic sick genes, and human drug-target genes indicate that there are advantageous drug targets among nodes with middle- to low-degree nodes. Such network properties provide the rationale for combinatorial drugs that target less prominent nodes to increase synergetic efficacy and create fewer side effects.
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Consistent design schematics for biological systems: standardization of representation in biological engineering.
J R Soc Interface
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2009
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The discovery by design paradigm driving research in synthetic biology entails the engineering of de novo biological constructs with well-characterized input-output behaviours and interfaces. The construction of biological circuits requires iterative phases of design, simulation and assembly, leading to the fabrication of a biological device. In order to represent engineered models in a consistent visual format and further simulating them in silico, standardization of representation and model formalism is imperative. In this article, we review different efforts for standardization, particularly standards for graphical visualization and simulation/annotation schemata adopted in systems biology. We identify the importance of integrating the different standardization efforts and provide insights into potential avenues for developing a common framework for model visualization, simulation and sharing across various tools. We envision that such a synergistic approach would lead to the development of global, standardized schemata in biology, empowering deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms as well as engineering of novel biological systems.
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Robustness and fragility in the yeast high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signal-transduction pathway.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2009
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Cellular signalling networks integrate environmental stimuli with the information on cellular status. These networks must be robust against stochastic fluctuations in stimuli as well as in the amounts of signalling components. Here, we challenge the yeast HOG signal-transduction pathway with systematic perturbations in components expression levels under various external conditions in search for nodes of fragility. We observe a substantially higher frequency of fragile nodes in this signal-transduction pathway than that has been observed for other cellular processes. These fragilities disperse without any clear pattern over biochemical functions or location in pathway topology and they are largely independent of pathway activation by external stimuli. However, the strongest toxicities are caused by pathway hyperactivation. In silico analysis highlights the impact of model structure on in silico robustness, and suggests complex formation and scaffolding as important contributors to the observed fragility patterns. Thus, in vivo robustness data can be used to discriminate and improve mathematical models.
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The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line.
, Harukazu Suzuki, Alistair R R Forrest, Erik van Nimwegen, Carsten O Daub, Piotr J Balwierz, Katharine M Irvine, Timo Lassmann, Timothy Ravasi, Yuki Hasegawa, Michiel J L de Hoon, Shintaro Katayama, Kate Schroder, Piero Carninci, Yasuhiro Tomaru, Mutsumi Kanamori-Katayama, Atsutaka Kubosaki, Altuna Akalin, Yoshinari Ando, Erik Arner, Maki Asada, Hiroshi Asahara, Timothy Bailey, Vladimir B Bajic, Denis Bauer, Anthony G Beckhouse, Nicolas Bertin, Johan Björkegren, Frank Brombacher, Erika Bulger, Alistair M Chalk, Joe Chiba, Nicole Cloonan, Adam Dawe, Josée Dostie, Pär G Engström, Magbubah Essack, Geoffrey J Faulkner, J Lynn Fink, David Fredman, Ko Fujimori, Masaaki Furuno, Takashi Gojobori, Julian Gough, Sean M Grimmond, Mika Gustafsson, Megumi Hashimoto, Takehiro Hashimoto, Mariko Hatakeyama, Susanne Heinzel, Winston Hide, Oliver Hofmann, Michael Hörnquist, Lukasz Huminiecki, Kazuho Ikeo, Naoko Imamoto, Satoshi Inoue, Yusuke Inoue, Ryoko Ishihara, Takao Iwayanagi, Anders Jacobsen, Mandeep Kaur, Hideya Kawaji, Markus C Kerr, Ryuichiro Kimura, Syuhei Kimura, Yasumasa Kimura, Hiroaki Kitano, Hisashi Koga, Toshio Kojima, Shinji Kondo, Takeshi Konno, Anders Krogh, Adele Kruger, Ajit Kumar, Boris Lenhard, Andreas Lennartsson, Morten Lindow, Marina Lizio, Cameron Macpherson, Norihiro Maeda, Christopher A Maher, Monique Maqungo, Jessica Mar, Nicholas A Matigian, Hideo Matsuda, John S Mattick, Stuart Meier, Sei Miyamoto, Etsuko Miyamoto-Sato, Kazuhiko Nakabayashi, Yutaka Nakachi, Mika Nakano, Sanne Nygaard, Toshitsugu Okayama, Yasushi Okazaki, Haruka Okuda-Yabukami, Valerio Orlando, Jun Otomo, Mikhail Pachkov, Nikolai Petrovsky, Charles Plessy, John Quackenbush, Aleksandar Radovanovic, Michael Rehli, Rintaro Saito, Albin Sandelin, Sebastian Schmeier, Christian Schönbach, Ariel S Schwartz, Colin A Semple, Miho Sera, Jessica Severin, Katsuhiko Shirahige, Cas Simons, George St Laurent, Masanori Suzuki, Takahiro Suzuki, Matthew J Sweet, Ryan J Taft, Shizu Takeda, Yoichi Takenaka, Kai Tan, Martin S Taylor, Rohan D Teasdale, Jesper Tegnér, Sarah Teichmann, Eivind Valen, Claes Wahlestedt, Kazunori Waki, Andrew Waterhouse, Christine A Wells, Ole Winther, Linda Wu, Kazumi Yamaguchi, Hiroshi Yanagawa, Jun Yasuda, Mihaela Zavolan, David A Hume, Takahiro Arakawa, Shiro Fukuda, Kengo Imamura, Chikatoshi Kai, Ai Kaiho, Tsugumi Kawashima, Chika Kawazu, Yayoi Kitazume, Miki Kojima, Hisashi Miura, Kayoko Murakami, Mitsuyoshi Murata, Noriko Ninomiya, Hiromi Nishiyori, Shohei Noma, Chihiro Ogawa, Takuma Sano, Christophe Simon, Michihira Tagami, Yukari Takahashi, Jun Kawai, Yoshihide Hayashizaki.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2009
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Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites, we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process.
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G-protein coupled receptor signaling architecture of mammalian immune cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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A series of recent studies on large-scale networks of signaling and metabolic systems revealed that a certain network structure often called "bow-tie network" are observed. In signaling systems, bow-tie network takes a form with diverse and redundant inputs and outputs connected via a small numbers of core molecules. While arguments have been made that such network architecture enhances robustness and evolvability of biological systems, its functional role at a cellular level remains obscure. A hypothesis was proposed that such a network function as a stimuli-reaction classifier where dynamics of core molecules dictate downstream transcriptional activities, hence physiological responses against stimuli. In this study, we examined whether such hypothesis can be verified using experimental data from Alliance for Cellular Signaling (AfCS) that comprehensively measured GPCR related ligands response for B-cell and macrophage. In a GPCR signaling system, cAMP and Ca2+ act as core molecules. Stimuli-response for 32 ligands to B-Cells and 23 ligands to macrophages has been measured. We found that ligands with correlated changes of cAMP and Ca2+ tend to cluster closely together within the hyperspaces of both cell types and they induced genes involved in the same cellular processes. It was found that ligands inducing cAMP synthesis activate genes involved in cell growth and proliferation; cAMP and Ca2+ molecules that increased together form a feedback loop and induce immune cells to migrate and adhere together. In contrast, ligands without a core molecules response are scattered throughout the hyperspace and do not share clusters. G-protein coupling receptors together with immune response specific receptors were found in cAMP and Ca2+ activated clusters. Analyses have been done on the original software applicable for discovering bow-tie network architectures within the complex network of intracellular signaling where ab initio clustering has been implemented as well. Groups of potential transcription factors for each specific group of genes were found to be partly conserved across B-cell and macrophage. A series of findings support the hypothesis.
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Identification of dosage-sensitive genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the genetic tug-of-war method.
Genome Res.
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Gene overexpression beyond a permissible limit causes defects in cellular functions. However, the permissible limits of most genes are unclear. Previously, we developed a genetic method designated genetic tug-of-war (gTOW) to measure the copy number limit of overexpression of a target gene. In the current study, we applied gTOW to the analysis of all protein-coding genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We showed that the yeast cellular system was robust against an increase in the copy number by up to 100 copies in >80% of the genes. After frameshift and segmentation analyses, we isolated 115 dosage-sensitive genes (DSGs) with copy number limits of 10 or less. DSGs contained a significant number of genes involved in cytoskeletal organization and intracellular transport. DSGs tended to be highly expressed and to encode protein complex members. We demonstrated that the protein burden caused the dosage sensitivity of highly expressed genes using a gTOW experiment in which the open reading frame was replaced with GFP. Dosage sensitivities of some DSGs were rescued by the simultaneous increase in the copy numbers of partner genes, indicating that stoichiometric imbalances among complexes cause dosage sensitivity. The results obtained in this study will provide basic knowledge about the physiology of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomal composition.
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Gene regulatory network analysis supports inflammation as a key neurodegeneration process in prion disease.
BMC Syst Biol
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The activation of immune cells in the brain is believed to be one of the earliest events in prion disease development, where misfolded PrionSc protein deposits are thought to act as irritants leading to a series of events that culminate in neuronal cell dysfunction and death. The role of these events in prion disease though is still a matter of debate. To elucidate the mechanisms leading from abnormal protein deposition to neuronal injury, we have performed a detailed network analysis of genes differentially expressed in several mouse prion models.
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CTen: a web-based platform for identifying enriched cell types from heterogeneous microarray data.
BMC Genomics
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Interpreting in vivo sampled microarray data is often complicated by changes in the cell population demographics. To put gene expression into its proper biological context, it is necessary to distinguish differential gene transcription from artificial gene expression induced by changes in the cellular demographics.
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Integrated network analysis reveals a novel role for the cell cycle in 2009 pandemic influenza virus-induced inflammation in macaque lungs.
BMC Syst Biol
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Annually, influenza A viruses circulate the world causing wide-spread sickness, economic loss, and death. One way to better defend against influenza virus-induced disease may be to develop novel host-based therapies, targeted at mitigating viral pathogenesis through the management of virus-dysregulated host functions. However, mechanisms that govern aberrant host responses to influenza virus infection remain incompletely understood. We previously showed that the pandemic H1N1 virus influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1; CA04) has enhanced pathogenicity in the lungs of cynomolgus macaques relative to a seasonal influenza virus isolate (A/Kawasaki/UTK-4/2009 (H1N1; KUTK4)).
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Software support for SBGN maps: SBGN-ML and LibSBGN.
Bioinformatics
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LibSBGN is a software library for reading, writing and manipulating Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN) maps stored using the recently developed SBGN-ML file format. The library (available in C++ and Java) makes it easy for developers to add SBGN support to their tools, whereas the file format facilitates the exchange of maps between compatible software applications. The library also supports validation of maps, which simplifies the task of ensuring compliance with the detailed SBGN specifications. With this effort we hope to increase the adoption of SBGN in bioinformatics tools, ultimately enabling more researchers to visualize biological knowledge in a precise and unambiguous manner.
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A framework for mapping, visualisation and automatic model creation of signal-transduction networks.
Mol. Syst. Biol.
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Intracellular signalling systems are highly complex. This complexity makes handling, analysis and visualisation of available knowledge a major challenge in current signalling research. Here, we present a novel framework for mapping signal-transduction networks that avoids the combinatorial explosion by breaking down the network in reaction and contingency information. It provides two new visualisation methods and automatic export to mathematical models. We use this framework to compile the presently most comprehensive map of the yeast MAP kinase network. Our method improves previous strategies by combining (I) more concise mapping adapted to empirical data, (II) individual referencing for each piece of information, (III) visualisation without simplifications or added uncertainty, (IV) automatic visualisation in multiple formats, (V) automatic export to mathematical models and (VI) compatibility with established formats. The framework is supported by an open source software tool that facilitates integration of the three levels of network analysis: definition, visualisation and mathematical modelling. The framework is species independent and we expect that it will have wider impact in signalling research on any system.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.