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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Osteonecrosis of femoral head occurred after stent placement of femoral artery.
Case Rep Orthop
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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We present a case of osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) that occurred after stent angiography of femoral artery for the treatment of arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) of left inferior limb in a 76-year-old woman. No case of late collapse of femoral head as a complication of endovascular procedure such as stent placement has been previously documented. We considered that ONFH occurred after detaining stent at a junction of left deep femoral artery for the treatment of the ischemia of left lateral and medial femoral circumflex artery.
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Relationship of acetabular dysplasia in females with osteoarthritis of the hip to the distance between both anterior superior iliac spines.
Med. Sci. Monit.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Acetabular dysplasia (AD) is the main cause of hip osteoarthritis in Japan. A simple method to evaluate acetabular dysplasia would be helpful for early treatment or prevention of hip osteoarthritis. Acetabular dysplasia is reported to be associated with pathological transverse growth of the pelvis, indicating that the distance between the 2 anterior superior iliac spines might be useful for screening and detection of acetabular dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to determine if the acetabular dysplasia radiographic parameters are related to the distance between the 2 anterior superior iliac spines in patients with hip osteoarthritis.
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Osteoarthritis hip joints in Japan: involvement of acetabular dysplasia.
J Orthop Sci
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2011
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We conducted a nationwide epidemiologic study regarding hip osteoarthritis (OA) in Japan, and a previous report found these patients to be unique in comparison to Caucasians. This report focused on the data regarding each hip joint, and the involvement of acetabular dysplasia with hip OA was analyzed.
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Elevation of the femur in THA through a direct anterior approach: cadaver and clinical studies.
Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2010
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The direct anterior approach in THA is an intermuscular approach that requires no muscle detachment. However, it is difficult to elevate the proximal femur for access to the femoral canal.
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Effect of undersizing on the long-term stability of the Exeter hip stem: A comparative in vitro study.
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon)
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2010
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Even for clinically successful hip stems such as the Exeter-V40 occasional failures are reported. It has been reported that sub-optimal pre-operative planning, leading to implant undersizing and/or thin cement mantle, can explain such failures. The scope of this study was to investigate whether stem undersizing and a thin cement mantle are sufficient to cause implant loosening.
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In vivo comparison of wear particles between highly crosslinked polyethylene and conventional polyethylene in the same design of total knee arthroplasties.
J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part B Appl. Biomater.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Reduction of wear with highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE) has been reported in in vitro and in vivo studies of total hip prostheses. However, use of HXLPE in total knee prostheses is still controversial. The aim of this study was to compare in vivo polyethylene wear particle generation of HXLPE with that of conventional polyethylene in total knee prostheses of the same design. Synovial fluid was obtained from four knees with HXLPE inserts and three knees with conventional polyethylene inserts at 1 year after operation. Polyethylene particles were isolated and examined using a scanning electron microscope and image analyzer. The total number of particles in each knee was 0.28 +/- 0.12 x 10(6) in HXPLE group (mean +/- standard error) and 6.87 +/- 2.85 x 10(6) in conventional polyethylene group (p = 0.040). Particle size (equivalent circle diameter) was 0.64 +/- 0.07 microm in HXPLE group and 1.21 +/- 0.21 microm in conventional polyethylene group (p = 0.030). Particle shape (aspect ratio) was 1.33 +/- 0.10 in HXLPE and 1.88 +/- 0.19 in conventional polyethylene (p = 0.035). Thepercentage of particles of submicron size was greater than 90% in HXLPE group and 55% in conventional polyethylene group. Except for the material of the polyethylene insert, the design and material of prostheses were completely the same in both groups. The HXLPE insert generated fewer, smaller, and rounder polyethylene wear particles than the conventional polyethylene insert in the early stage after surgery.
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The risk of notching the anterior femoral cortex with the use of navigation systems in total knee arthroplasty.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2009
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Use of navigation systems has recently been introduced in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to achieve more reliable prosthetic alignment. In the sagittal plane, there are two important requirements for navigation systems: (1) perpendicular cut to the femoral mechanical axis and (2) prevention of notching of anterior femoral cortex. These two requirements, however, may conflict. The angles between the line of the anterior femoral cortex and four sagittal femoral mechanical axes for navigation systems using radiographs of the entire lower extremity, while standing were measured and compared. These four sagittal axes simulated on the radiographs in navigation systems were in extension relative to the line of the anterior femoral cortex in 40-85% of cases in male and 65-100% in elderly female. The present study showed that navigation systems have the potential risk for notching of anterior femoral cortex.
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Intra- and intersurgeon variability in image-free navigation system for THA.
Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2009
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In image-free navigation systems, cup orientation is determined in the pelvic coordinate by registration of bony landmarks. While the value of navigation relates primarily to the reliability and accuracy of cup placement, the reliability of registration plays a role in cup placement. We therefore examined intra- and intersurgeon variability in registration and the distance between registration points in each bony landmark. Thirty-seven THAs were performed in the lateral position and 15 THAs in the supine position. The cup was fixed using a navigation system. The registration was repeated two more times by operator and assistant, and the intra- and intersurgeon variability of cup abduction angle and anteversion was analyzed by ICC (intraclass correlation coefficients). In 25 hips, the distance between intrasurgeon registration points and between intersurgeon registration points in each landmark were calculated. The ICC in the lateral position ranged between 0.59 and 0.81, and between 0.85 and 0.95 in the supine position. The ICCs of cup abduction angle for the intra- and intersurgeon variability were 0.92 and 0.95 for the supine position and 0.65 and 0.59 for the lateral position. Those of anteversion were 0.93, 0.85, and 0.81, 0.72, respectively. The variability in locating the ASIS in the lateral position was greater than that in the supine position. The variability of registration points depended on bony landmarks and patient position but the range of variability we found would not likely result in a large variability in cup placement.
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TKA sagittal alignment with navigation systems and conventional techniques vary only a few degrees.
Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2009
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Navigation systems have been developed to achieve more reliable prosthetic alignment in TKAs. However, the component alignment in the sagittal plane is reportedly less reliable than in the coronal plane even with navigation systems. We measured and compared sagittal prosthetic alignments for TKAs with the conventional technique and three navigation approaches to establish reference frames, using radiographs of the entire lower extremity while standing. The sagittal alignments simulated on the radiographs with the conventional technique and navigation systems differed by a mean of 2 degrees to 4 degrees . Use of navigation systems resulted in a mean of 1 degrees to 4 degrees hyperextension between the femoral and tibial components and use of the conventional technique resulted in a mean of 1 degrees flexion. Use of different reference points on the distal femoral condyle for the navigation systems resulted in differences of as much as 3 degrees alignment in the sagittal plane. Although optimal prosthetic alignment for TKA in the sagittal plane is unknown, surgeons and technicians using navigation systems should be aware of this difference in the sagittal plane and the risk of hyperextension between the femoral and tibial components, which might be associated with osteolysis and anterior post-cam impingement.
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Factors influencing the stability of stems fixed with impaction graft in vitro.
Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2009
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Mechanical stability of the stem is believed to be an important factor in successful impaction grafting in revision THA. We asked whether particle size, femoral bone deficiencies, stem design, graft composition, and impaction technique influenced the initial stability of the stem in vitro using model femora and human bone particles. Bone particles made with a reciprocating blade-type bone mill contained larger particles with a broader size distribution than those made by a rotating drum-type bone mill and had higher stiffness on compression testing. The stiffness on torsional testing decreased as the degree of proximal-medial segmental deficiencies increased. The stiffness and maximum torque in a stem with a rectangular cross section and wide anteroposterior surface were higher in torsional tests. Adding hydroxyapatite granules to the bone particles increased the torsional stability. To facilitate compact bone particles, we developed a spacer between the guidewire and modified femoral packers. This spacer facilitated compacting bone particles from the middle up to the proximal and the technique increased the amount of impacted bone particles at the middle of the stem and also improved the initial stability of the stem. Stem design and degree of deficiencies influenced stiffness in the torsional test and the addition of hydroxyapatite granules enhanced torsional stiffness.
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Pseudoaneurysm Accompanied by Crowe Type IV Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: A Case Report.
Case Rep Orthop
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We report the case of a 72-year-old woman whose pseudoaneurysm was difficult to diagnose and treat. The patient had a history of congenital dislocated hip and was undergoing anticoagulation therapy with warfarin due to the mitral valve replacement. Her chief complaint was pain and enlargement of the left buttock, and the laboratory tests revealed severe anemia. However, her elderly depression confused her chief complaint, and she was transferred to a psychiatric hospital. Two months after the onset of the symptoms, she was finally diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm by contrast-enhanced CT and angiography. IDC coils were used for embolization. A plain CT showed hemostasis as well as a reduced hematoma at 2 months after the embolization. The possible contributing factors for the pseudoaneurysm included bleeding due to warfarin combined with an intramuscular hematoma accompanied by Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip that led to an arterial rupture by impingement between pelvis and femoral head. Since the warfarin treatment could not be halted due to the valve replacement, embolization was chosen for her treatment, and the treatment outcome was favorable.
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Accuracy of cup height and medialization in THA for dysplastic hip osteoarthritis using an imageless navigation system.
Orthopedics
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In total hip arthroplasty (THA) for dysplastic hip osteoarthritis, bony deformity makes it difficult to identify the correct cup height and medialization. The authors developed a new technique for registration and navigation of cup position for dysplastic hips using an imageless navigation system. Eighty dysplastic hips (Crowe type I, n=58; type II, n=18; type III, n=4) underwent THA. Thirty-four hips were operated on while in the supine position and 46 hips were operated on while in the lateral position. Before capsulectomy, the anterior pelvic plane and the position of the femur were registered. After exposure of the acetabulum, the teardrop, posterior rim, and medial wall of the acetabulum were registered. Then the cup height, cup medialization, cup inclination, anteversion, and leg lengthening were navigated. The difference between the navigated and radiographic cup heights was 4.5 ± 4.0 mm, the difference in cup medialization was 3.0 ± 2.5 mm, the difference in cup inclination was 4.3° ± 3.1°, the difference in cup anteversion was 5.5° ± 3.8°, and the difference in leg lengthening was 3.7 ± 3.0 mm. Comparison of the first 20 cases with the last 20 cases showed that the accuracy of cup medialization was significantly improved. These differences were not affected by Crowe type or surgical position. Because the correct cup height and medialization are key issues in THA for dysplastic hip osteoarthritis, the accuracy of cup height and medialization in this imageless navigation system were acceptable for clinical application.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.