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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Rbm46 regulates trophectoderm differentiation by stabilizing Cdx2 mRNA in early mouse embryos.
Stem Cells Dev.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2014
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Blastocyst formation represents the first lineage specification by segregation of the trophectoderm from the inner cell mass in early embryonic development. Transcriptional regulation of Cdx2, which is selectively expressed in and essential for the specification of trophectoderm, has been extensively studied. However, post-transcriptional regulation of Cdx2 remains largely unknown. Here we report that Rbm46, an RNA-binding motif protein with unknown function, directly binds to and stabilizes Cdx2 mRNA in early mouse embryos. In addition, knockdown of Rbm46 using RNA interference down-regulated the majority of trophectoderm markers in mouse ESCs and blocked the allocation of blastomere cells to the trophectoderm in mouse embryos. Our study revealed a novel mechanism by which Rbm46 regulates trophectoderm specification through stabilizing Cdx2 mRNA in early mouse embryos.
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Systematically labeling developmental stage-specific genes for the study of pancreatic ?-cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells.
Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2014
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The applications of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cells in regenerative medicine has encountered a long-standing challenge: how can we efficiently obtain mature cell types from hPSCs? Attempts to address this problem are hindered by the complexity of controlling cell fate commitment and the lack of sufficient developmental knowledge for guiding hPSC differentiation. Here, we developed a systematic strategy to study hPSC differentiation by labeling sequential developmental genes to encompass the major developmental stages, using the directed differentiation of pancreatic ? cells from hPSCs as a model. We therefore generated a large panel of pancreas-specific mono- and dual-reporter cell lines. With this unique platform, we visualized the kinetics of the entire differentiation process in real time for the first time by monitoring the expression dynamics of the reporter genes, identified desired cell populations at each differentiation stage and demonstrated the ability to isolate these cell populations for further characterization. We further revealed the expression profiles of isolated NGN3-eGFP(+) cells by RNA sequencing and identified sushi domain-containing 2 (SUSD2) as a novel surface protein that enriches for pancreatic endocrine progenitors and early endocrine cells both in human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived pancreatic cells and in the developing human pancreas. Moreover, we captured a series of cell fate transition events in real time, identified multiple cell subpopulations and unveiled their distinct gene expression profiles, among heterogeneous progenitors for the first time using our dual reporter hESC lines. The exploration of this platform and our new findings will pave the way to obtain mature ? cells in vitro.
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Generation of naive induced pluripotent stem cells from rhesus monkey fibroblasts.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2014
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Conventional embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from primates resemble mouse epiblast stem cells, raising an intriguing question regarding whether the naive pluripotent state resembling mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) exists in primates and how to capture it in vitro. Here we identified several specific signaling modulators that are sufficient to generate rhesus monkey fibroblast-derived iPSCs with the features of naive pluripotency in terms of growth properties, gene expression profiles, self-renewal signaling, X-reactivation, and the potential to generate cross-species chimeric embryos. Interestingly, together with recent reports of naive human pluripotent stem cells, our findings suggest several conserved signaling pathways shared with rodents and specific to primates, providing significant insights for acquiring naive pluripotency from other species. In addition, the derivation of rhesus monkey naive iPSCs also provides a valuable cell source for use in preclinical research and disease modeling.
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Mouse SCNT ESCs have lower somatic mutation load than syngeneic iPSCs.
Stem Cell Reports
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2014
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Ectopic expression of reprogramming factors has been widely adopted to reprogram somatic nucleus into a pluripotent state (induced pluripotent stem cells [iPSCs]). However, genetic aberrations such as somatic gene mutation in the resulting iPSCs have raised concerns regarding their clinical utility. To test whether the increased somatic mutations are primarily the by-products of current reprogramming methods, we reprogrammed embryonic fibroblasts of inbred C57BL/6 mice into either iPSCs (8 lines, 4 previously published) or embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT ESCs; 11 lines). Exome sequencing of these lines indicates a significantly lower mutation load in SCNT ESCs than iPSCs of syngeneic background. In addition, one SCNT-ESC line has no detectable exome mutation, and two pairs of SCNT-ESC lines only have shared preexisting mutations. In contrast, every iPSC line carries unique mutations. Our study highlights the need for improving reprogramming methods in more physiologically relevant conditions.
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Human hepatocytes with drug metabolic function induced from fibroblasts by lineage reprogramming.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Obtaining fully functional cell types is a major challenge for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. Currently, a fundamental solution to this key problem is still lacking. Here, we show that functional human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) can be generated from fibroblasts by overexpressing the hepatic fate conversion factors HNF1A, HNF4A, and HNF6 along with the maturation factors ATF5, PROX1, and CEBPA. hiHeps express a spectrum of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes and phase III drug transporters. Importantly, the metabolic activities of CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 are comparable between hiHeps and freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. Transplanted hiHeps repopulate up to 30% of the livers of Tet-uPA/Rag2(-/-)/?c(-/-) mice and secrete more than 300 ?g/ml human ALBUMIN in vivo. Our data demonstrate that human hepatocytes with drug metabolic function can be generated by lineage reprogramming, thus providing a cell resource for pharmaceutical applications.
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Lineage specifiers: new players in the induction of pluripotency.
Genomics Proteomics Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2013
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Pluripotency-associated factors and their rivals, lineage specifiers, have long been considered the determining factors for the identity of pluripotent and differentiated cells, respectively. Therefore, factors that are employed for cellular reprogramming in order to induce pluripotency have been identified mainly from embryonic stem cell (ESC)-enriched and pluripotency-associated factors. Recently, lineage specifiers have been identified to play important roles in orchestrating the process of restoring pluripotency. In this review, we summarize the latest discoveries regarding cell fate conversion using pluripotency-associated factors and lineage specifiers. We highlight the value of the "seesaw" model in defining cellular identity, opening up a novel scenario to consider pluripotency and lineage specification.
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Pluripotent stem cells induced from mouse somatic cells by small-molecule compounds.
Science
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Pluripotent stem cells can be induced from somatic cells, providing an unlimited cell resource, with potential for studying disease and use in regenerative medicine. However, genetic manipulation and technically challenging strategies such as nuclear transfer used in reprogramming limit their clinical applications. Here, we show that pluripotent stem cells can be generated from mouse somatic cells at a frequency up to 0.2% using a combination of seven small-molecule compounds. The chemically induced pluripotent stem cells resemble embryonic stem cells in terms of their gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, and potential for differentiation and germline transmission. By using small molecules, exogenous "master genes" are dispensable for cell fate reprogramming. This chemical reprogramming strategy has potential use in generating functional desirable cell types for clinical applications.
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Induction of pluripotency in mouse somatic cells with lineage specifiers.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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The reprogramming factors that induce pluripotency have been identified primarily from embryonic stem cell (ESC)-enriched, pluripotency-associated factors. Here, we report that, during mouse somatic cell reprogramming, pluripotency can be induced with lineage specifiers that are pluripotency rivals to suppress ESC identity, most of which are not enriched in ESCs. We found that OCT4 and SOX2, the core regulators of pluripotency, can be replaced by lineage specifiers that are involved in mesendodermal (ME) specification and in ectodermal (ECT) specification, respectively. OCT4 and its substitutes attenuated the elevated expression of a group of ECT genes, whereas SOX2 and its substitutes curtailed a group of ME genes during reprogramming. Surprisingly, the two counteracting lineage specifiers can synergistically induce pluripotency in the absence of both OCT4 and SOX2. Our study suggests a "seesaw model" in which a balance that is established using pluripotency factors and/or counteracting lineage specifiers can facilitate reprogramming.
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Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into thymic epithelial progenitor-like cells reconstitutes the thymic microenvironment in vivo.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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Thymus transplantation has great clinical potential for treating immunological disorders, but the shortage of transplant donors limits the progress of this therapy. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are promising cell sources for generating thymic epithelial cells. Here, we report a stepwise protocol to direct the differentiation of hESCs into thymic epithelial progenitor-like cells (TEPLCs) by mimicking thymus organogenesis with sequential regulation of Activin, retinoic acid, BMP, and WNT signals. The hESC-derived TEPLCs expressed the key thymic marker gene FOXN1 and could further develop in vivo into thymic epithelium expressing the functional thymic markers MHC II and AIRE upon transplantation. Moreover, the TEPLC-derived thymic epithelium could support mouse thymopoiesis in T-cell-deficient mice and promote human T cell generation in NOD/SCID mice engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs). These findings could facilitate hESC-based replacement therapy and provide a valuable in vitro platform for studying human thymus organogenesis and regeneration.
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Telomere reprogramming and maintenance in porcine iPS cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Telomere reprogramming and silencing of exogenous genes have been demonstrated in mouse and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). Pigs have the potential to provide xenotransplant for humans, and to model and test human diseases. We investigated the telomere length and maintenance in porcine iPS cells generated and cultured under various conditions. Telomere lengths vary among different porcine iPS cell lines, some with telomere elongation and maintenance, and others telomere shortening. Porcine iPS cells with sufficient telomere length maintenance show the ability to differentiate in vivo by teratoma formation test. IPS cells with short or dysfunctional telomeres exhibit reduced ability to form teratomas. Moreover, insufficient telomerase and incomplete telomere reprogramming and/or maintenance link to sustained activation of exogenous genes in porcine iPS cells. In contrast, porcine iPS cells with reduced expression of exogenous genes or partial exogene silencing exhibit insufficient activation of endogenous pluripotent genes and telomerase genes, accompanied by telomere shortening with increasing passages. Moreover, telomere doublets, telomere sister chromatid exchanges and t-circles that presumably are involved in telomere lengthening by recombination also are found in porcine iPS cells. These data suggest that both telomerase-dependent and telomerase-independent mechanisms are involved in telomere reprogramming during induction and passages of porcine iPS cells, but these are insufficient, resulting in increased telomere damage and shortening, and chromosomal instability. Active exogenes might compensate for insufficient activation of endogenous genes and incomplete telomere reprogramming and maintenance of porcine iPS cells. Further understanding of telomere reprogramming and maintenance may help improve the quality of porcine iPS cells.
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Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Bats (Chiroptera) host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat) or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida) for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S) protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3) were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus) and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.
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TGF? inhibition enhances the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human ES cell-derived hemogenic endothelial cells using a stepwise strategy.
Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2011
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Embryonic hematopoiesis is a complex process. Elucidating the mechanism regulating hematopoietic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells would allow us to establish a strategy to efficiently generate hematopoietic cells. However, the mechanism governing the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) remains unknown. Here, on the basis of the emergence of CD43(+) hematopoietic cells from hemogenic endothelial (HE) cells, we demonstrated that VEGF was essential and sufficient, and that bFGF was synergistic with VEGF to specify the HE cells and the subsequent transition into CD43(+) hematopoietic cells. Significantly, we identified TGF? as a novel signal to regulate hematopoietic development, as the TGF? inhibitor SB 431542 significantly promoted the transition from HE cells into CD43(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) during hESC differentiation. By defining these critical signaling factors during hematopoietic differentiation, we can efficiently generate HPCs from hESCs. Our strategy could offer an in vitro model to study early human hematopoietic development.
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Holoclone forming cells from pancreatic cancer cells enrich tumor initiating cells and represent a novel model for study of cancer stem cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2011
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Pancreatic cancer is one of the direct causes of cancer-related death. High level of chemoresistance is one of the major obstacles of clinical treatment. In recent years, cancer stem cells have been widely identified and indicated as the origin of chemoresistance in multi-types of solid tumors. Increasing evidences suggest that cancer stem cells reside in the cells capable of forming holoclones continuously. However, in pancreatic cancer, holoclone-forming cells have not been characterized yet. Therefore, the goal of our present study was to indentify the holoclone-forming pancreatic cancer stem cells and develop an in vitro continuous colony formation system, which will greatly facilitate the study of pancreatic cancer stem cells.
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CD24: a novel surface marker for PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.
Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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Human ESCs provide a promising cell resource for the treatment of type I diabetes mellitus. Although PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors can be efficiently generated from human ESCs by stepwise induction, further in vitro differentiation into functional, mature beta cells is not efficient or reproducible. Purification of pancreatic progenitor cells could facilitate the identification of signals that regulate beta cell differentiation and maturation. Here, we report the identification of a novel surface marker for PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors based on an in vitro human ESC differentiation system. By costaining PDX1 and a panel of cell surface antigens at the pancreatic progenitor stage of human ESC differentiation, we discovered a positive marker, CD24. CD24-positive cells coexpressed most of the key transcription factors of pancreatic progenitors, and the expression of important pancreatic genes was greatly enriched in CD24-positive cells compared with the CD24-negative cells. In addition, CD24-positive cells could differentiate into insulin-producing cells but CD24-negative cells could not. These results indicate that CD24 could be a surface marker for PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors derived from human ESCs. Enrichment of pancreatic progenitors with this marker will facilitate the investigation of beta cell maturation during the human ESC differentiation.
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Generation of iPSCs from mouse fibroblasts with a single gene, Oct4, and small molecules.
Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2010
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The introduction of four transcription factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc by viral transduction can induce reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), but the use of iPSCs is hindered by the use of viral delivery systems. Chemical-induced reprogramming offers a novel approach to generating iPSCs without any viral vector-based genetic modification. Previous reports showed that several small molecules could replace some of the reprogramming factors although at least two transcription factors, Oct4 and Klf4, are still required to generate iPSCs from mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Here, we identify a specific chemical combination, which is sufficient to permit reprogramming from mouse embryonic and adult fibroblasts in the presence of a single transcription factor, Oct4, within 20 days, replacing Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. The iPSCs generated using this treatment resembled mouse embryonic stem cells in terms of global gene expression profile, epigenetic status and pluripotency both in vitro and in vivo. We also found that 8 days of Oct4 induction was sufficient to enable Oct4-induced reprogramming in the presence of the small molecules, which suggests that reprogramming was initiated within the first 8 days and was independent of continuous exogenous Oct4 expression. These discoveries will aid in the future generation of iPSCs without genetic modification, as well as elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie the reprogramming process.
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Genomic characterization of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus in European bats and classification of coronaviruses based on partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequences.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2010
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Bats may host emerging viruses, including coronaviruses (CoV). We conducted an evaluation of CoV in rhinolophid and vespertilionid bat species common in Europe. Rhinolophids carried severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-related CoV at high frequencies and concentrations (26% of animals are positive; up to 2.4×10(8) copies per gram of feces), as well as two Alphacoronavirus clades, one novel and one related to the HKU2 clade. All three clades present in Miniopterus bats in China (HKU7, HKU8, and 1A related) were also present in European Miniopterus bats. An additional novel Alphacoronavirus clade (bat CoV [BtCoV]/BNM98-30) was detected in Nyctalus leisleri. A CoV grouping criterion was developed by comparing amino acid identities across an 816-bp fragment of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) of all accepted mammalian CoV species (RdRp-based grouping units [RGU]). Criteria for defining separate RGU in mammalian CoV were a >4.8% amino acid distance for alphacoronaviruses and a >6.3% distance for betacoronaviruses. All the above-mentioned novel clades represented independent RGU. Strict associations between CoV RGU and host bat genera were confirmed for six independent RGU represented simultaneously in China and Europe. A SARS-related virus (BtCoV/BM48-31/Bulgaria/2008) from a Rhinolophus blasii (Rhi bla) bat was fully sequenced. It is predicted that proteins 3b and 6 were highly divergent from those proteins in all known SARS-related CoV. Open reading frame 8 (ORF8) was surprisingly absent. Surface expression of spike and staining with sera of SARS survivors suggested low antigenic overlap with SARS CoV. However, the receptor binding domain of SARS CoV showed higher similarity with that of BtCoV/BM48-31/Bulgaria/2008 than with that of any Chinese bat-borne CoV. Critical spike domains 472 and 487 were identical and similar, respectively. This study underlines the importance of assessments of the zoonotic potential of widely distributed bat-borne CoV.
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Patients beware: commercialized stem cell treatments on the web.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2010
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A report by the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR)s Task Force on Unproven Stem Cell Treatments outlines development of resources for patients, their families, and physicians seeking information on stem cell treatments.
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Identification and characterization of Bmi-1-responding element within the human p16 promoter.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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Bmi-1, the first functionally identified polycomb gene family member, plays critical roles in cell cycle regulation, cell immortalization, and cell senescence. Bmi-1 is involved in the development and progression of carcinomas and is a potent target for cancer therapy. One important pathway regulated by Bmi-1 is that involving two cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf), as Bmi-1 represses the INK4a locus on which they are encoded. A close correlation between the up-regulation of Bmi-1 and down-regulation of p16 has been demonstrated in various tumors; however, how Bmi-1 regulates p16 expression is not clear. In this study, we revealed that Bmi-1 regulates the expression of p16 by binding directly to the Bmi-1-responding element (BRE) within the p16 promoter. The BRE resided at bp -821 to -732 upstream of the p16 ATG codon. BRE alone was sufficient to allow Bmi-1-mediated regulation of the CMV promoter. Bmi-1 typically functions by forming a complex with Ring2; however, regulation of p16 was independent of Ring2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing of Bmi-1-precipitated chromatin DNA revealed that 1536 genes were targeted by Bmi-1, including genes involved in tissue-specific differentiation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. By analyzing the binding sequences of these genes, we found two highly conserved Bmi-1-binding motifs, which were required for Bmi-1-mediated p16 promoter regulation. Taken together, our results revealed the molecular mechanism of Bmi-1-mediated regulation of the p16 gene, thus providing further insights into the functions of Bmi-1 as well as a sensitive high-throughput platform with which to screen Bmi-1-targeted small molecules for cancer therapy.
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Retinoic acid enhances the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human embryonic stem cell-derived hemato-vascular precursors.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2010
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Current induction schemes directing hematopoietic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are not well defined to mimic the sequential stages of hematopoietic development in vivo. Here, we report a 3-stage method to direct differentiation of hESCs toward hematopoietic progenitors in chemically defined mediums. In the first 2 stages, we efficiently generated T-positive primitive streak/mesendoderm cells and kinase domain receptor-positive (KDR(+)) platelet-derived growth factor receptor ?-negative (PDGFR?(-)) hemato-vascular precursors sequentially. In the third stage, we found that cells in a spontaneous differentiation condition mainly formed erythroid colonies. Addition of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) greatly enhanced generation of hematopoietic progenitors in this stage while suppressing erythroid development. The RA-treated cells highly expressed definitive hematopoietic genes, formed large numbers of multilineage and myeloid colonies, and gave rise to greater than 45% CD45(+) hematopoietic cells. When hematopoietic progenitors were selected with CD34 and C-Kit, greater than 95% CD45(+) hematopoietic cells could be generated. In addition, we found that endogenous RA signaling at the second stage was required for vascular endothelial growth factor/basic fibroblast growth factor-induced hemato-vascular specification, whereas exogenously applied RA efficiently induced KDR(-)PDGFR?(+) paraxial mesoderm cells. Our study suggests that RA signaling plays diverse roles in human mesoderm and hematopoietic development.
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Powering reprogramming with vitamin C.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2010
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In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Esteban et al. (2009) report that vitamin C enhances the reprogramming efficiency of mouse and human fibroblasts transduced with three (Oct4/Klf4/Sox2) or four (Oct4/Klf4/Sox2/cMyc) factors. Vitamin C can alleviate cell senescence by p53 repression and may accelerate reprogramming by synergizing with epigenetic regulators.
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Generation of homogeneous PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors from human ES cell-derived endoderm cells.
J Mol Cell Biol
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2009
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One key step in producing insulin-secreting cells from human embryonic stem (hES) cells is the generation of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX1)-expressing pancreatic progenitor cells. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) has important roles in pancreas development and is widely used to induce pancreatic differentiation of ES cells. When RA was added directly to the activin A-induced hES cells, <20% cells were positive for the pancreatic marker PDX1, whereas the other cells were mainly hepatic cells. We found that when the activin A-induced hES cells were replated and seeded at low cell densities, the addition of RA induced significant pancreatic differentiation and over 70% of cells in culture expressed PDX1. When the endodermal cells were isolated with the surface marker CXCR4 from the activin A-induced culture and further differentiated with RA, a homogeneous PDX1(+) cell population (over 95% pure) was generated. The PDX1(+) cells could further differentiate into cells that expressed pancreatic transcription factors and pancreatic endocrine or exocrine markers. We also found that RA inhibited the hepatic differentiation of endodermal cells that were seeded at low cell densities, and this inhibition may have been through the inhibition of Smad1/5/8 activity. Thus, we present a highly efficient and reproducible protocol for generating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells from hES cells.
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A mouse model of inducible liver injury caused by tet-on regulated urokinase for studies of hepatocyte transplantation.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2009
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Mouse models of liver injury provide useful tools for studying hepatocyte engraftment and proliferation. A representative model of liver injury is the albumin-urokinase (Alb-uPA) transgenic model, but neonatal lethality hampers its widespread application. To overcome this problem, we generated a transgenic mouse in which transcription of the reverse tetracycline transactivator was (rtTA) driven by the mouse albumin promoter, and backcrossed the rtTA mice onto severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/bg mice to generate immunodeficient rtTA/SCID mice. We then produced recombinant adenoviruses Ad.TRE-uPA, in which the urokinase was located downstream of the tetracycline response element (TRE). The rtTA/SCID mouse hepatocytes were then infected with Ad.TRE-uPA to establish an inducible liver injury mouse model. In the presence of doxycycline, uPA was exclusively expressed in endogenous hepatocytes and caused extensive liver injury. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled mouse hepatocytes selectively repopulated the rtTA/SCID mouse liver and replaced over 80% of the recipient liver mass after repeated administration of Ad.TRE-uPA. Compared with the original uPA mice, rtTA/SCID mice did not exhibit problems regarding breeding efficiency, and the time window for transplantation was flexible. In addition, we could control the extent of liver injury to facilitate transplantation surgery by regulating the dose of Ad.TRE-uPA. Our inducible mouse model will be convenient for studies of hepatocyte transplantation and hepatic regeneration, and this system will facilitate screening for potential genetic factors critical for engraftment and proliferation of hepatocytes in vivo.
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Efficient generation of hepatocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.
Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2009
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Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, and can proliferate intensively and differentiate into a variety of cell types. However, the hepatic differentiation of human iPS cells has not yet been reported. In this report, human iPS cells were induced to differentiate into hepatic cells by a stepwise protocol. The expression of liver cell markers and liver-related functions of the human iPS cell-derived cells were monitored and compared with that of differentiated human ES cells and primary human hepatocytes. Approximately 60% of the differentiated human iPS cells at day 7 expressed hepatic markers alpha fetoprotein and Alb. The differentiated cells at day 21 exhibited liver cell functions including albumin Asecretion, glycogen synthesis, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 activity. The expression of hepatic markers and liver-related functions of the iPS cell-derived hepatic cells were comparable to that of the human ES cell-derived hepatic cells. These results show that human iPS cells, which are similar to human ES cells, can be efficiently induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells.
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Repopulation efficiencies of adult hepatocytes, fetal liver progenitor cells, and embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic cells in albumin-promoter-enhancer urokinase-type plasminogen activator mice.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2009
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Fetal liver progenitor cell suspensions (FLPC) and hepatic precursor cells derived from embryonic stem cells (ES-HPC) represent a potential source for liver cell therapy. However, the relative capacity of these cell types to engraft and repopulate a recipient liver compared with adult hepatocytes (HC) has not been comprehensively assessed. We transplanted mouse and human HC, FLPC, and ES-HPC into a new immunodeficient mouse strain (Alb-uPA(tg(+/-))Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice) and estimated the percentages of HC after 3 months. Adult mouse HC repopulated approximately half of the liver mass (46.6 +/- 8.0%, 1 x 10(6) transplanted cells), whereas mouse FLPC derived from day 13.5 and 11.5 post conception embryos generated only 12.1 +/- 3.0% and 5.1 +/- 1.1%, respectively, of the recipient liver and smaller cell clusters. Adult human HC and FLPC generated overall less liver tissue than mouse cells and repopulated 10.0 +/- 3.9% and 2.7 +/- 1.1% of the recipient livers, respectively. Mouse and human ES-HPC did not generate HC clusters in our animal model. We conclude that, in contrast to expectations, adult HC of human and mouse origin generate liver tissue more efficiently than cells derived from fetal tissue or embryonic stem cells in a highly immunodeficient Alb-uPA transgenic mouse model system. These results have important implications in the context of selecting the optimal strategy for human liver cell therapies.
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Pluripotin combined with leukemia inhibitory factor greatly promotes the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines from refractory strains.
Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2009
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Most mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from a 129 or C57BL/6 background, whereas the derivation efficiency of ES cells is extremely low on certain refractory types of background for which ES cells are highly desired. Here we report an optimized, highly efficient protocol by combining pluripotin, a small molecule, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) for the derivation of mouse ES cells. With this method, we successfully isolated ES cell lines from five strains of mice, with an efficiency of 57% for NOD-scid, 63% for SCID beige, 80% for CD-1, and 100% for two F1 strains from C57BL/6xCD-1. By tracking the Oct4-positive cells in the Oct4-green fluorescent protein embryos in the process of ES cell isolation, we found that pluripotin combined with LIF improved the efficiency of ES cell isolation by selectively maintaining the Oct4-positive cells in the outgrowth. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ES cells being efficiently derived from immunodeficient mice on refractory backgrounds (NOD-scid on a NOD background and SCID beige on a BALB/c background).
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Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) from raccoon dog can serve as an efficient receptor for the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.
J. Gen. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2009
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Raccoon dog is one of the suspected intermediate hosts of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In this study, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene of raccoon dog (rdACE2) was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of rdACE2 has identities of 99.3, 89.2, 83.9 and 80.4 % to ACE2 proteins from dog, masked palm civet (pcACE2), human (huACE2) and bat, respectively. There are six amino acid changes in rdACE2 compared with huACE2, and four changes compared with pcACE2, within the 18 residues of ACE2 known to make direct contact with the SARS-CoV S protein. A HeLa cell line stably expressing rdACE2 was established; Western blot analyses and an enzyme-activity assay indicated that the cell line expressed ACE2 at a similar level to two previously established cell lines that express ACE2 from human and masked palm civet, respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus-backboned pseudoviruses expressing spike proteins derived from human SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs were tested for their entry efficiency into these cell lines. The results showed that rdACE2 is a more efficient receptor for human SARS-CoV, but not for SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs, than huACE2 or pcACE2. This study provides useful data to elucidate the role of raccoon dog in SARS outbreaks.
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Humanized mice for modeling human infectious disease: challenges, progress, and outlook.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2009
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Over 800 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and malaria, resulting in more than 5 million deaths annually. Here we discuss the potential and challenges of humanized mouse models for developing effective and affordable therapies and vaccines, which are desperately needed to combat these diseases.
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Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells.
Sci. China, C, Life Sci.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2009
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Efficiently obtaining functional pancreatic islet cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy, but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology. In 2001, hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro. Since then, many strategies (such as overexpression of key transcription factors, delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development, co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas, stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells. Moreover, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells. iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.
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Pancreas-specific Pten deficiency causes partial resistance to diabetes and elevated hepatic AKT signaling.
Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2009
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PTEN, a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT pathway, is an important modulator of insulin signaling. To determine the metabolic function of pancreatic Pten, we generated pancreas-specific Pten knockout (PPKO) mice. PPKO mice had enlarged pancreas and elevated proliferation of acinar cells. They also exhibited hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and altered amino metabolism. Notably, PPKO mice showed delayed onset of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and sex-biased resistance to high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. To investigate the mechanism for the resistance to HFD-induced hyperglycemia in PPKO mice, we evaluated AKT phosphorylation in major insulin-responsive tissues: the liver, muscle, and fat. We found that Pten loss in the pancreas causes the elevation of AKT signaling in the liver. The phosphorylation of AKT and its downstream substrate GSK3beta was increased in the liver of PPKO mice, while PTEN level was decreased without detectable excision of Pten allele in the liver of PPKO mice. Proteomics analysis revealed dramatically decreased level of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in the liver of PPKO mice, which may also contribute to the lower blood glucose level of PPKO mice fed with HFD. Together, our findings reveal a novel response in the liver to pancreatic defect in metabolic regulation, adding a new dimension to understanding diabetes resistance.
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Derivation and characterization of hepatic progenitor cells from human embryonic stem cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2009
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The derivation of hepatic progenitor cells from human embryonic stem (hES) cells is of value both in the study of early human liver organogenesis and in the creation of an unlimited source of donor cells for hepatocyte transplantation therapy. Here, we report for the first time the generation of hepatic progenitor cells derived from hES cells. Hepatic endoderm cells were generated by activating FGF and BMP pathways and were then purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting using a newly identified surface marker, N-cadherin. After co-culture with STO feeder cells, these purified hepatic endoderm cells yielded hepatic progenitor colonies, which possessed the proliferation potential to be cultured for an extended period of more than 100 days. With extensive expansion, they co-expressed the hepatic marker AFP and the biliary lineage marker KRT7 and maintained bipotential differentiation capacity. They were able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, which expressed ALB and AAT, and into cholangiocyte-like cells, which formed duct-like cyst structures, expressed KRT19 and KRT7, and acquired epithelial polarity. In conclusion, this is the first report of the generation of proliferative and bipotential hepatic progenitor cells from hES cells. These hES cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells could be effectively used as an in vitro model for studying the mechanisms of hepatic stem/progenitor cell origin, self-renewal and differentiation.
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P21cip-overexpression in the mouse beta cells leads to the improved recovery from streptozotocin-induced diabetes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2009
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Under normal conditions, the regeneration of mouse beta cells is mainly dependent on their own duplication. Although there is evidence that pancreatic progenitor cells exist around duct, whether non-beta cells in the islet could also potentially contribute to beta cell regeneration in vivo is still controversial. Here, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model to study the pancreatic beta cell regeneration, which could specifically inhibit beta cell proliferation by overexpressing p21(cip) in beta cells via regulation of the Tet-on system. We discovered that p21 overexpression could inhibit beta-cell duplication in the transgenic mice and these mice would gradually suffer from hyperglycemia. Importantly, the recovery efficiency of the p21-overexpressing mice from streptozotocin-induced diabetes was significantly higher than control mice, which is embodied by better physiological quality and earlier emergence of insulin expressing cells. Furthermore, in the islets of these streptozotocin-treated transgenic mice, we found a large population of proliferating cells which expressed pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) but not markers of terminally differentiated cells. Transcription factors characteristic of early pancreatic development, such as Nkx2.2 and NeuroD1, and pancreatic progenitor markers, such as Ngn3 and c-Met, could also be detected in these islets. Thus, our work showed for the first time that when beta cell self-duplication is repressed by p21 overexpression, the markers for embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells could be detected in islets, which might contribute to the recovery of these transgenic mice from streptozotocin-induced diabetes. These discoveries could be important for exploring new diabetes therapies that directly promote the regeneration of pancreatic progenitors to differentiate into islet beta cells in vivo.
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Comparison of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with the S proteins from a porcine and a human coronavirus.
J. Gen. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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The surface proteins S of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were compared for their ability to mediate infection of viral pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The cell tropism of the respective pseudotypes corresponded to the tropism of the viruses from which the S protein was derived. Higher infectivity values were obtained with the SARS-CoV S protein than with the TGEV S protein. Differences were observed with respect to the importance of the cytoplasmic tail and the membrane anchor of the S proteins. In the case of the SARS-CoV S protein, truncation of the cytoplasmic tail resulted in increased infectivity. For the TGEV S protein, the inactivation of an intracellular retention signal in the cytoplasmic tail was required. Exchange of the membrane anchor of the S proteins led to a low infection efficiency. Our results indicate that related glycoproteins may show substantial differences in their ability to mediate pseudotype infection.
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Highly efficient differentiation of human ES cells and iPS cells into mature pancreatic insulin-producing cells.
Cell Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2009
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Human pluripotent stem cells represent a potentially unlimited source of functional pancreatic endocrine lineage cells. Here we report a highly efficient approach to induce human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to differentiate into mature insulin-producing cells in a chemical-defined culture system. The differentiated human ES cells obtained by this approach comprised nearly 25% insulin-positive cells as assayed by flow cytometry analysis, which released insulin/C-peptide in response to glucose stimuli in a manner comparable to that of adult human islets. Most of these insulin-producing cells co-expressed mature beta cell-specific markers such as NKX6-1 and PDX1, indicating a similar gene expression pattern to adult islet beta cells in vivo. In this study, we also demonstrated that EGF facilitates the expansion of PDX1-positive pancreatic progenitors. Moreover, our protocol also succeeded in efficiently inducing human iPS cells to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. Therefore, this work not only provides a new model to study the mechanism of human pancreatic specialization and maturation in vitro, but also enhances the possibility of utilizing patient-specific iPS cells for the treatment of diabetes.
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Stem cell science on the rise in China.
Cell Stem Cell
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Chinas output in fundamental stem cell research has increased markedly in recent years. Vigorous public investment and infrastructure development have enabled major productivity gains, but challenges in regulation, governance, and the management of clinical expectations must be addressed to ensure scientific quality and sustainable growth.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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