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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Association of interferon-?-induced protein-10 serum levels with virological responses to PEG-interferon-based therapy in hepatitis C virus genotype 1 or 2 chronically infected Chinese patients.
Scand. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2014
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Abstract Objective. Interferon (IFN)-?-induced protein-10 (IP-10) serum level has been shown be associated with viral response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. However, little is known in Chinese population. We determined IP-10 serum levels in Chinese CHC patients undergoing PEG-IFN-based therapy. Predictive role of IP-10 level for virological responses was accessed. Material and methods. IP-10 serum levels were determined in 165 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and 33 genotype 2 patients. Multivariate analysis was performed to screen independent factors for sustained virological response (SVR) prediction. Predictive value of IP-10 level in combination with interleukin 28B (IL28B) genotype or rapid virological response was further investigated. Results. Our study showed that pretreatment IP-10 level was significantly higher in HCV genotype 1 patients. IP-10 levels were independently predictive for SVR with cut-off values of 250.60 pg/ml at baseline or 407.40 pg/ml at week 4. Positive predictive value (PPV) for SVR of low IP-10 level at baseline and IL28B CC genotype was 96.15% and negative predictive value (NPV) was 50.00%. PPV for SVR of low IP-10 level at week 4 and rapid viral response (RVR) was 95.24% and NPV was 50.00%. Conclusion. Together our study indicated that higher IP-10 serum levels were associated with HCV genotype 1 CHC Chinese patients. IP-10 levels at baseline and week 4 were both predictive of SVR and improved predictive performances of IL28B genotype and RVR for SVR.
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Performance comparison of the versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA) and the abbott realtime HCV genotype II assay for detecting hepatitis C virus genotype 6.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2014
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The Versant HCV genotype 2.0 assay (line probe assay [LiPA] 2.0), based on reverse hybridization, and the Abbott Realtime HCV genotype II assay (Realtime II), based on genotype-specific real-time PCR, have been widely used to analyze hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes. However, their performances for detecting HCV genotype 6 infections have not been well studied. Here, we analyzed genotype 6 in 63 samples from the China HCV Genotyping Study that were originally identified as genotype 6 using the LiPA 2.0. The genotyping results were confirmed by nonstructural 5B (NS5B) or core sequence phylogenetic analysis. A total of 57 samples were confirmed to be genotype 6 (51 genotype 6a, 5 genotype 6n, and 1 genotype 6e). Four samples identified as a mixture of genotypes 6 and 4 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 3b. The remaining two samples classified as genotype 6 by the LiPA 2.0 were confirmed to be genotype 1b, which were intergenotypic recombinants and excluded from further comparison. In 57 genotype 6 samples detected using the Realtime II version 2.00 assay, 47 genotype 6a samples were identified as genotype 6, one 6e sample was misclassified as genotype 1, and four 6a and five 6n samples yielded indeterminate results. Nine nucleotide profiles in the 5' untranslated region affected the performances of both assays. Therefore, our analysis shows that both assays have limitations in identifying HCV genotype 6. The LiPA 2.0 cannot distinguish some 3b samples from genotype 6 samples. The Realtime II assay fails to identify some 6a and all non-6a subtypes, and it misclassifies genotype 6e as genotype 1.
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Prediction of spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion in HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients during the immune clearance phase.
J. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2014
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Spontaneous hepatitis B virus (HBV) e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion is associated with reduced risk of liver-related complications, but is poorly understood. In this study, 113 chronic hepatitis B patients in the immune active HBeAg-positive phase were followed up for 76 weeks. Based on the outcome of liver function, HBeAg, hepatitis B viral e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBV DNA at week 76, 18 patients were classified as spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion group (group A) and 95 patients were classified as non-spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion group (group B). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only week 28 HBV DNA levels were used for the logistic regression equation, and the odds ratio was 0.505 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.366-0.697). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for HBV DNA and HBeAg levels at week 28 were 0.824 (P?
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Association between CISH polymorphisms and spontaneous clearance of hepatitis B virus in hepatitis B extracellular antigen-positive patients during immune active phase.
Chin. Med. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2014
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Some hepatitis B extracellular antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in their immune active phase can clear the virus spontaneously and enter into an inactive hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier state, indicating a benign prognosis. In this study, the association between cytokine-inducible SRC homology 2 domain protein (CISH) gene polymorphisms at -292 (rs414171) and the spontaneous clearance of HBV in HBeAg-positive CHB patients in immune the active phase was investigated.
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Associations between age at menarche and menopause with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis in Chinese women.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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Ages at menarche and menopause are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and osteoporosis in Caucasian women, but associations remain unexplored in Chinese women.
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Determination of the human antibody response to the neutralization epitopes encompassing amino acids 313-327 and 432-443 of hepatitis C virus E1E2 glycoproteins.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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It has been reported that monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the E1E2 glycoproteins may have the potential to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The protective epitopes targeted by these MAbs have been mapped to the regions encompassing amino acids 313-327 and 432-443. In this study, we synthesized these two peptides and tested the reactivity of serum samples from 336 patients, 210 of which were from Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) patients infected with diverse HCV genotypes. The remaining 126 samples were isolated from patients who had spontaneously cleared HCV infection. In the chronic HCV-infected group (CHC group), the prevalence of human serum antibodies reactive to epitopes 313-327 and 432-443 was 24.29% (51 of 210) and 4.76% (10 of 210), respectively. In the spontaneous clearance group (SC group), the prevalence was 0.79% (1 of 126) and 12.70% (16 of 126), respectively. The positive serum samples that contained antibodies reactive to epitope 313-327 neutralized HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) bearing the envelope glycoproteins of genotypes 1a or 1b and/or 4, but genotypes 2a, 3a, 5 and 6 were not neutralized. The neutralizing activity of these serum samples could not be inhibited by peptide 313-327. Six samples (SC17, SC38, SC86, SC92, CHC75 and CHC198) containing antibodies reactive to epitope 432-443 had cross-genotype neutralizing activities. The neutralizing activity of SC38, SC86, SC92 and CHC75 was partially inhibited by peptide 432-443. However, the neutralizing activity of sample SC17 for genotype 4HCVpp and sample CHC198 for genotype 1b HCVpp were not inhibited by the peptide. This study identifies the neutralizing ability of endogenous anti-HCV antibodies and warrants the exploration of antibodies reactive to epitope 432-443 as sources for future antibody therapies.
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MicroRNAs-372/373 promote the expression of hepatitis B virus through the targeting of nuclear factor I/B.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Recent evidence has indicated the pathological relevance of miRNA dysregulation in hepatitis virus infection; however, the roles of microRNAs in the regulation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) expression are still largely unknown. In this study we identified that miR-373 was up-regulated in HBV-infected liver tissues and that the members of the miRs-371-372-373 (miRs-371-3) gene cluster were also significantly co-up-regulated in HBV-producing HepG2.2.15 cells. A positive in vivo association was identified between hepatic HBV DNA levels and the copy number variation of the miRs-371-3 gene cluster. The enhanced expression of miRs-372/373 stimulated the production of HBV proteins and HBV core-associated DNA in HepG2 cells transfected with 1.3×HBV. Further, nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) was identified to be a direct functional target of miRs-372/373 by in silico algorithms and this was subsequently confirmed by western blotting and luciferase reporter assays. Knockdown of NFIB by small interfering RNA (siRNA) promoted HBV expression, whereas rescue of NFIB attenuated the stimulation in the 1.3×HBV-transfected HepG2 cells. Conclusion: Our study revealed that miRNA (miRs-372/373) can promote HBV expression through a pathway involving the transcription factor (NFIB). This novel model provides new insights into the molecular basis in HBV and host interaction.
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Proteome responses to stable hepatitis B virus transfection and following interferon alpha treatment in human liver cell line HepG2.
Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide health problem and may develop to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the global proteome responses of liver-derived cells to HBV infection and IFNalpha treatment, 2-DE and MS-based analysis were performed to compare the proteome changes between HBV stably transfected cell line HepG2.2.15 and its parental cell line HepG2, as well as HepG2.2.15 before and after IFNalpha treatment (5000 IU/mL for 72 h). Compared to HepG2, 12 of 18 down-regulated and 27 of 32 up-regulated proteins were identified in HepG2.2.15. After IFNalpha treatment, 6 of 7 down-regulated and 11 of 14 up-regulated proteins were identified. Differentially expressed proteins caused by HBV infection were involved with cytoskeletal matrix, heat shock stress, kinases/signal transduction, protease/proteasome components, etc. Prohibitin showed a dose-dependent up-regulation during IFNalpha treatment and might play a potent role in anti-HBV activities of IFNalpha by enhancing the crossbinding p53 expression to achieve the apoptosis of HBV infected liver cells. Down-regulation of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in HepG2.2.15 and recovery by IFNalpha suggested its relationship with IFNalphas anti-HBV effect.
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DCs pulsed with novel HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes against hepatitis C virus induced a broadly reactive anti-HCV-specific T lymphocyte response.
PLoS ONE
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To determine the capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with single or multiple-peptide mixtures of novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) epitopes to stimulate HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) effector functions.
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Distribution and clinical correlates of viral and host genotypes in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.
J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
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Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively frequent in China. This study investigated the clinical, demographic, and viral and host genetic characteristics that may influence disease manifestations and clinical management.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.