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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on angiographic outcomes after drug-eluting stents in patients with de novo long coronary artery lesions.
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in coronary artery disease. Long coronary artery lesions may be associated with adverse outcomes after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate angiographic outcomes after a comprehensive CR program in patients with DESs for long coronary artery lesions. A total of 576 patients treated with DESs for long (?25 mm) coronary lesions were enrolled in this prospective CR registry. Comprehensive CR programs were successfully performed in 288 patients (50%). The primary end point was in-stent late luminal loss at the 9-month angiographic follow-up. There were few significant differences between the CR and non-CR groups in terms of baseline characteristics, including clinical, angiographic, and procedural variables. The rate of in-stent late luminal loss in the CR group was 35% less than in the usual care group (0.19 ± 0.33 mm in CR vs 0.29 ± 0.45 mm in non-CR, difference 0.08 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.16, p = 0.02) at the 9-month follow-up. After propensity-matched analysis (224 pairs), the results were consistent (0.18 ± 0.31 mm in CR vs 0.28 ± 0.41 mm in non-CR, difference 0.10 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.18, p = 0.02). The CR group showed a significant improvement in the overall risk profile compared with the non-CR group, including current smoking, biochemical profiles, depression, obesity, and exercise capacity. In conclusion, the comprehensive CR program significantly reduced late luminal loss after DES implantation for long coronary lesions. This may be associated with significant improvements in exercise capacity and overall risk profile.
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Effect of antisera from Clostridium difficile-infected mice on toxin-A-induced colonic epithelial cell death signaling.
J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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Clostridium difficile causes mucosal damage and diarrhea by releasing two exotoxins: toxin A and toxin B. C. difficile colitis is associated with alterations in bowel flora and the failure to mount an effective antibody response. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether antitoxin sera prevent toxin-A-induced apoptosis, cytoskeletal disaggregation, cell detachment, and tight junction loss in cultured colonic epithelial cells. Serum samples were isolated from mice that survived a C. difficile infection following antibiotic treatment, and the antitoxin effects of these samples were investigated in toxin-A-exposed HT29 colonic epithelial cells and a toxin-A-induced animal model of gut inflammation. Unchallenged mice did not produce IgG against toxin A, whereas serum (antiserum) from C. difficile-challenged mice showed significant IgG responses against toxin A. Treatment with the antiserum markedly inhibited mucosal damage and inflammation in the toxin-A-treated mouse model. In contrast to control mouse serum, the antiserum also markedly inhibited toxin-A-induced DNA fragmentation, dephosphorylation of paxillin and Epo receptor (EpoR), deacetylation of tubulin, and upregulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and p53. Taken together, these results reveal that the generated antitoxin serum has biotherapeutic effects in preventing various C. difficile toxin-A-induced cellular toxicities.
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Role of NADH: quinone oxidoreductase-1 in the tight junctions of colonic epithelial cells.
BMB Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is known to be involved in the regulation of energy synthesis and metabolism, and the functional studies of NQO1 have largely focused on metabolic disorders. Here, we show for the first time that compared to NQO1-WT mice, NQO1-KO mice exhibited a marked increase of permeability and spontaneous inflammation in the gut. In the DSS-induced colitis model, NQO1-KO mice showed more severe inflammatory responses than NQO1-WT mice. Interestingly, the transcript levels of claudin and occludin, the major tight junction molecules of gut epithelial cells, were significantly decreased in NQO1-KO mice. The colons of NQO1-KO mice also showed high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, which are known to affect transcriptional regulation. Taken together, these novel findings indicate that NQO1 contributes to the barrier function of gut epithelial cells by regulating the transcription of tight junction molecules.
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Directed evolution of human heavy chain variable domain (VH) using in vivo protein fitness filter.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable domains (VH) are promising scaffolds for antigen binding. However, VH is an unstable and aggregation-prone protein, hindering its use for therapeutic purposes. To evolve the VH domain, we performed in vivo protein solubility selection that linked antibiotic resistance to the protein folding quality control mechanism of the twin-arginine translocation pathway of E. coli. After screening a human germ-line VH library, 95% of the VH proteins obtained were identified as VH3 family members; one VH protein, MG2x1, stood out among separate clones expressing individual VH variants. With further screening of combinatorial framework mutation library of MG2x1, we found a consistent bias toward substitution with tryptophan at the position of 50 and 58 in VH. Comparison of the crystal structures of the VH variants revealed that those substitutions with bulky side chain amino acids filled the cavity in the VH interface between heavy and light chains of the Fab arrangement along with the increased number of hydrogen bonds, decreased solvation energy, and increased negative charge. Accordingly, the engineered VH acquires an increased level of thermodynamic stability, reversible folding, and soluble expression. The library built with the VH variant as a scaffold was qualified as most of VH clones selected randomly were expressed as soluble form in E. coli regardless length of the combinatorial CDR. Furthermore, a non-aggregation feature of the selected VH conferred a free of humoral response in mice, even when administered together with adjuvant. As a result, this selection provides an alternative directed evolution pathway for unstable proteins, which are distinct from conventional methods based on the phage display.
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Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimers disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.
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Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates head and neck cancer stem cell traits through suppression of Notch pathway.
Eur. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Most solid cancers including head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC) are believed to be initiated from and maintained by cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for treatment resistance, resulting in tumour relapse. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant polyphenol in green tea, can potently inhibit cancer growth and induce apoptosis in various cancers, including HNSC. However, its effect on HNSC CSCs is not well elucidated. In this study, we examined the anti-tumour effect of EGCG on HNSC CSCs. We demonstrated that EGCG inhibits the self-renewal capacity of HNSC CSCs by suppressing their sphere forming capacity, and attenuates the expression of stem cell markers, such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44. EGCG treatment augmented cisplatin-mediated chemosensitivity by suppressing ABCC2 and ABCG2 transporter genes, which are putative molecules of treatment resistance of CSC. In addition, the combination treatment of EGCG and cisplatin inhibited tumour formation and induced apoptosis in a xenograft model. As one of mechanisms of suppression of HNSC CSC traits, EGCG decreased the transcriptional level of Notch, resulting in the inhibition of Notch signalling. Collectively, our data suggest that EGCG in combination with cisplatin can be used for the management of HNSC CSCs.
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The insect peptide coprisin prevents Clostridium difficile-mediated acute inflammation and mucosal damage through selective antimicrobial activity.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
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Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis are typically treated with vancomycin or metronidazole, but recent increases in relapse incidence and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of C. difficile indicate the need for new antibiotics. We previously isolated coprisin, an antibacterial peptide from Copris tripartitus, a Korean dung beetle, and identified a nine-amino-acid peptide in the ?-helical region of it (LLCIALRKK) that had antimicrobial activity (J.-S. Hwang et al., Int. J. Pept., 2009, doi:10.1155/2009/136284). Here, we examined whether treatment with a coprisin analogue (a disulfide dimer of the nine peptides) prevented inflammation and mucosal damage in a mouse model of acute gut inflammation established by administration of antibiotics followed by C. difficile infection. In this model, coprisin treatment significantly ameliorated body weight decreases, improved the survival rate, and decreased mucosal damage and proinflammatory cytokine production. In contrast, the coprisin analogue had no apparent antibiotic activity against commensal bacteria, including Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, which are known to inhibit the colonization of C. difficile. The exposure of C. difficile to the coprisin analogue caused a marked increase in nuclear propidium iodide (PI) staining, indicating membrane damage; the staining levels were similar to those seen with bacteria treated with a positive control for membrane disruption (EDTA). In contrast, coprisin analogue treatment did not trigger increases in the nuclear PI staining of Bifidobacterium thermophilum. This observation suggests that the antibiotic activity of the coprisin analogue may occur through specific membrane disruption of C. difficile. Thus, these results indicate that the coprisin analogue may prove useful as a therapeutic agent for C. difficile infection-associated inflammatory diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis.
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Enhancement of vaccine-induced primary and memory CD8(+) T-cell responses by soluble PD-1.
J. Immunother.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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Programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling through its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, has been known to negatively regulate T-cell responses. In addition, PD-L1 has been shown to interact with B7-1 costimulatory molecule to inhibit T-cell responses. Extensive studies have shown that PD-1/PD-L blockade restores exhausted T cells during chronic viral infections and tumors. In this study, we evaluated the effects of soluble PD-1 (sPD-1) as a blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 on vaccine-elicited antigen-specific T-cell responses in mice. Coadministration of sPD-1 DNA with human papilloma virus-16 E7 DNA vaccine significantly enhanced E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses, resulting in potent antitumor effects against E7-expressing tumors. We also found that sPD-1, codelivered with adenovirus-based vaccine, could increase antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses, indicating vaccine type-independent adjuvant effect of sPD-1. In addition, the frequency and functional activity of adoptively transferred OT-I cells, particularly memory CD8(+) T cells, were augmented by coadministration of sPD-1 DNA, which was closely associated with increased T-cell proliferation and reduced T-cell apoptosis through upregulation of Bcl-xL expression during T-cell activation. Codelivery of sPD-1 DNA also enhanced maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo which was accompanied by upregulation of DC maturation markers such as major histocompatibility complex class II. Taken together, our findings show that sPD-1 potently enhances codelivered antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses and in vivo maturation of DCs during activation of naive CD8(+) T cells, suggesting that an immunization strategy with sPD-1 as an adjuvant can be used to increase antigen-specific T-cell immunity elicited by vaccination.
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Downregulation of erythropoietin receptor by overexpression of phospholipase C-gamma 1 is critical for decrease on focal adhesion in transformed cells.
Cell Oncol (Dordr)
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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Phospholipase C-?l (PLC-?l) is known to play a critical role in cell adhesion and migration and is highly expressed in metastatic tumors. In the current study, we found that cells transformed by PLC overexpression (PLC-?l cells) exhibited a marked decrease in expression of the Epo receptor (EpoR). Here, we assessed the role of EpoR-dependent signaling pathways in PLC-?l-dependent regulation of cell adhesion and migration.
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Association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and occult coronary artery disease detected by multi-detector computed tomography.
Int. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Arterial stiffness, assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), has been reported to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We assessed the association between arterial stiffness, as determined by PWV, and occult coronary artery disease (CAD), as detected by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), in asymptomatic individuals.
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Codelivery of IL-7 Augments Multigenic HCV DNA Vaccine-induced Antibody as well as Broad T Cell Responses in Cynomolgus Monkeys.
Immune Netw
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2010
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A crucial limitation of DNA vaccines is its weak immunogenicity, especially in terms of eliciting antibody responses in non-human primates or humans; therefore, it is essential to enhance immune responses to vaccination for the development of successful DNA vaccines for humans.
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Clostridium difficile toxin A decreases acetylation of tubulin, leading to microtubule depolymerization through activation of histone deacetylase 6, and this mediates acute inflammation.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2010
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Clostridium difficile toxin A is known to cause actin disaggregation through the enzymatic inactivation of intracellular Rho proteins. Based on the rapid and severe cell rounding of toxin A-exposed cells, we speculated that toxin A may be involved in post-translational modification of tubulin, leading to microtubule instability. In the current study, we observed that toxin A strongly reduced ?-tubulin acetylation in human colonocytes and mouse intestine. Fractionation analysis demonstrated that toxin A-induced ?-tubulin deacetylation yielded monomeric tubulin, indicating the presence of microtubule depolymerization. Inhibition of the glucosyltransferase activity against Rho proteins of toxin A by UDP-2,3-dialdehyde significantly abrogated toxin A-induced ?-tubulin deacetylation. In colonocytes treated with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of the HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase, toxin A-induced ?-tubulin deacetylation and loss of tight junction were completely blocked. Administration of TSA also attenuated proinflammatory cytokine production, mucosal damage, and epithelial cell apoptosis in mouse intestine exposed to toxin A. These results suggest that toxin A causes microtubule depolymerization by activation of HDAC6-mediated tubulin deacetylation. Indeed, blockage of HDAC6 by TSA markedly attenuates ?-tubulin deacetylation, proinflammatory cytokine production, and mucosal damage in a toxin A-induced mouse enteritis model. Tubulin deacetylation is an important component of the intestinal inflammatory cascade following toxin A-mediated Rho inactivation in vitro and in vivo.
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Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-kappaB in H1299 human lung cancer cells.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2009
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Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (Galphai1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of Galphai1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Galphai1QL. Galphai1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-kappaB, which resulted from an increase in NF-kappaB p50 protein. We conclude that Galphai1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-kappaB activation.
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Clostridium difficile toxin A inhibits erythropoietin receptor-mediated colonocyte focal adhesion through inactivation of Janus Kinase-2.
J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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Previously, we demonstrated that the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is present on fibroblasts, where it regulates focal contact. Here, we assessed whether this action of EpoR is involved in the reduced cell adhesion observed in colonocytes exposed to Clostridium difficile toxin A. EpoR was present and functionally active in cells of the human colonic epithelial cell line HT29 and epithelial cells of human colon tissues. Toxin A significantly decreased activating phosphorylations of EpoR and its downstream signaling molecules JAK-2 (Janus kinase 2) and STAT5 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5). In vitro kinase assays confirmed that toxin A inhibited JAK 2 kinase activity. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2 (with AG490) abrogated activating phosphorylations of EpoR and also decreased focal contacts in association with inactivation of paxillin, an essential focal adhesion molecule. In addition, AG490 treatment significantly decreased expression of occludin (a tight junction molecule) and tight junction levels. Taken together, these data suggest that inhibition of JAK2 by toxin A in colonocytes causes inactivation of EpoR, thereby enhancing the inhibition of focal contact formation and loss of tight junctions known to be associated with the enzymatic activity of toxin A.
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The insect peptide CopA3 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation.
J. Pept. Sci.
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We recently demonstrated that the insect peptide CopA3 (LLCIALRKK), a disulfide-linked dimeric peptide, exerts antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities in a mouse colitis model. Here, we examined whether CopA3 inhibited activation of macrophages by LPS. Exposure of an unseparated mouse peritoneal cell population or isolated peritoneal macrophages to LPS markedly increased secretion of IL-6 and TNF-?; these effects were significantly inhibited by CopA3 treatment. The inhibitory effect of CopA3 was also evident in murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Western blotting revealed that LPS-induced activation of STAT1 and STAT5 in macrophages was significantly inhibited by CopA3. Inhibition of JAK (STAT1/STAT5 kinase) with AG490 markedly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-? in macrophages. Collectively, these observations suggest that CopA3 inhibits macrophage activation by inhibiting activating phosphorylations of the transcription factors, STAT1 and STAT5, and blocking subsequent production of IL-6 and TNF-? and indicate that CopA3 may be useful as an immune-modulating agent.
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Clostridium difficile toxin A inhibits the kinase activity of extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 through direct binding.
J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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Clostridium difficile toxin A glucosylates Rho family proteins, resulting in actin filament disaggregation and cell rounding in cultured colonocytes. Given that the cellular toxicity of toxin A is dependent on its receptor binding and subsequent entry into the cell, we herein sought to identify additional colonocyte proteins that might bind to toxin A following its internalization. Our results revealed that toxin A interacted with ERK1 and ERK2 in two human colonocyte cell lines (NCM460 and HT29). A GST-pulldown assay also showed that toxin A can directly bind to ERK1 and ERK2. In NCM460 cells exposed to PMA (an ERK1/2 activator), the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 did not affect the interaction between toxin A and ERK1/2. However, an in vitro kinase assay showed that the direct binding of toxin A to ERK1 or ERK2 inhibited their kinase activities. These results suggest a new molecular mechanism for the cellular toxicity seen in cells exposed to toxin A.
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Cells transformed by PLC-gamma 1 overexpression are highly sensitive to clostridium difficile toxin A-induced apoptosis and mitotic inhibition.
J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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Phospholipase C-?l (PLC-?l) expression is associated with cellular transformation. Notably, PLC-gamma is up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissue and breast carcinoma. Because exotoxins released by Clostridium botulinum have been shown to induce apoptosis and promote growth arrest in various cancer cell lines, we examined here the potential of Clostridium difficile toxin A to selectively induce apoptosis in cells transformed by PLC-?l overexpression. We found that PLC-?l-transformed cells, but not vectortransformed (control) cells, were highly sensitive to C. difficile toxin A-induced apoptosis and mitotic inhibition. Moreover, expression of the proapoptotic Bcl2 family member, Bim, and activation of caspase-3 were significantly up-regulated by toxin A in PLC-?l-transformed cells. Toxin A-induced cell rounding and paxillin dephosphorylation were also significantly higher in PLC-?l-transformed cells than in control cells. These findings suggest that C. difficile toxin A may have potential as an anticancer agent against colorectal cancers and breast carcinomas in which PLC-?l is highly up-regulated.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.