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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Influence of smartphone Wi-Fi signals on adipose-derived stem cells.
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
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The use of smartphones is expanding rapidly around the world, thus raising the concern of possible harmful effects of radiofrequency generated by smartphones. We hypothesized that Wi-Fi signals from smartphones may have harmful influence on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). An in vitro study was performed to assess the influence of Wi-Fi signals from smartphones. The ASCs were incubated under a smartphone connected to a Wi-Fi network, which was uploading files at a speed of 4.8 Mbps for 10 hours a day, for a total of 5 days. We constructed 2 kinds of control cells, one grown in 37°C and the other grown in 39°C. After 5 days of Wi-Fi exposure from the smartphone, the cells underwent cell proliferation assay, apoptosis assay, and flow cytometry analysis. Three growth factors, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and transforming growth factor-?, were measured from ASC-conditioned media. Cell proliferation rate was higher in Wi-Fi-exposed cells and 39°C control cells compared with 37°C control cells. Apoptosis assay, flow cytometry analysis, and growth factor concentrations showed no remarkable differences among the 3 groups. We could not find any harmful effects of Wi-Fi electromagnetic signals from smartphones. The increased proliferation of ASCs under the smartphone, however, might be attributable to the thermal effect.
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Empirical treatment of highly suspected nontuberculous mycobacteria infections following aesthetic procedures.
Arch Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2014
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Infection caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing. Awareness of this infection is crucial yet problematic. Delayed management may lead to destructive results. We empirically treated a series of patients with clinical suspicion of NTM infection prior to the identification of the pathogen.
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Highly reactive nonheme iron(III) iodosylarene complexes in alkane hydroxylation and sulfoxidation reactions.
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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High-spin iron(III) iodosylarene complexes bearing an N-methylated cyclam ligand are synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic methods. The nonheme high-spin iron(III) iodosylarene intermediates are highly reactive oxidants capable of activating strong C-H bonds of alkanes; the reactivity of the iron(III) iodosylarene intermediates is much greater than that of the corresponding iron(IV) oxo complex. The electrophilic character of the iron(III) iodosylarene complexes is demonstrated in sulfoxidation reactions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.