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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Impaired Exercise Capacity: A Cross-Sectional Study.
J Clin Sleep Med
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2014
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Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Because cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) aids in prognostic assessment of heart disease, there is rising interest in its utility for cardiovascular risk stratification of patients with OSA. However, the relationship between OSA and exercise capacity is unclear. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that OSA is associated with impaired exercise capacity.
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Untreated sleep-disordered breathing: links to aging-related decline in sleep-dependent memory consolidation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Increasing age is associated with a decline in cognition and motor skills, while at the same time exacerbating one's risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA-related cognitive deficits are highly prevalent and can affect various memory systems including overnight memory consolidation on a motor sequence task. Thus, the aim of our study was to examine the effect of aging on sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in patients with and without OSA.
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Risk of stroke from sleep apnea in men and women.
Expert Rev Neurother
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2010
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Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder, and research on the effects of sleep apnea is important to gain insight into how sleep affects health. Untreated OSA has been associated with important health consequences, such as an increased risk for hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Previous studies have shown that OSA also represents a risk factor for stroke. The relationship between OSA and stroke is particularly relevant, as stroke is the second leading cause of death globally. The reviewed article presents new data from the Sleep Heart Health Study, a longitudinal cohort study, which shows an association between incident stroke and untreated OSA of varying severity for men and possibly more severe OSA for women. The study is discussed in the context of the current state of knowledge about OSA, in particular its health consequences, and the general limitations in conducting research with OSA patients.
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Cognitive profile and brain morphological changes in obstructive sleep apnea.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by neurocognitive impairment, likely mediated by injury to various brain regions. We evaluated brain morphological changes in patients with OSA and their relationship to neuropsychological and oximetric data. Sixteen patients affected by moderate-severe OSA (age: 55.8±6.7 years, 13 males) and fourteen control subjects (age: 57.6±5.1 years, 9 males) underwent 3.0 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing evaluating short- and long-term memory, executive functions, language, attention, praxia and non-verbal learning. Volumetric segmentation of cortical and subcortical structures and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were performed. Patients and controls differed significantly in Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning test (immediate and delayed recall), Stroop test and Digit span backward scores. Volumes of cortical gray matter (GM), right hippocampus, right and left caudate were smaller in patients compared to controls, with also brain parenchymal fraction (a normalized measure of cerebral atrophy) approaching statistical significance. Differences remained significant after controlling for comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, smoking, hypercholesterolemia). VBM analysis showed regions of decreased GM volume in right and left hippocampus and within more lateral temporal areas in patients with OSA. Our findings indicate that the significant cognitive impairment seen in patients with moderate-severe OSA is associated with brain tissue damage in regions involved in several cognitive tasks. We conclude that OSA can increase brain susceptibility to the effects of aging and other clinical and pathological occurrences.
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Cognitive replay of visuomotor learning at sleep onset: temporal dynamics and relationship to task performance.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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Studies of neural activity in animals and humans suggest that experiences are "replayed" in cortical and hippocampal networks during NREM sleep. Here, we examine whether memory reactivation in sleeping humans might also be evident within reports of concomitant subjective experience (i.e., dreaming).
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Reduced overnight consolidation of procedural learning in chronic medicated schizophrenia is related to specific sleep stages.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2009
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We previously reported that patients with schizophrenia failed to demonstrate normal sleep-dependent improvement in motor procedural learning. Here, we tested whether this failure was associated with the duration of Stage 2 sleep in the last quartile of the night (S2q4) and with spindle activity during this epoch. Fourteen patients with schizophrenia and 15 demographically matched controls performed a motor sequence task (MST) before and after a night of polysomnographically monitored sleep. Patients showed no significant overnight task improvement and significantly less than controls, who did show significant improvement. While there were no group differences in overall sleep architecture, patients showed significant reductions in fast sigma frequency power (45%) and in spindle density (43%) during S2q4 sleep at the electrode proximal to the motor cortex controlling the hand that performed the MST. Although spindle activity did not correlate with overnight improvement in either group, S2q4 sleep duration in patients significantly correlated with the plateau level of overnight improvement seen at the end of the morning testing session, and slow wave sleep (SWS) duration correlated with the delay in reaching this plateau. SWS and S2q4 sleep each predicted the initial level of overnight improvement in schizophrenia, and their product explained 77% of the variance, suggesting that both sleep stages are necessary for consolidation. These findings replicate our prior observation of reduced sleep-dependent consolidation of motor procedural learning in schizophrenia and link this deficit to specific sleep stages. They provide further evidence that sleep is an important contributor to cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.
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Sleep enhances category learning.
Learn. Mem.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2009
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The ability to categorize objects and events in the world around us is a fundamental and critical aspect of human learning. We trained healthy adults on a probabilistic category-learning task in two different training modes. The aim of this study was to see whether either form of probabilistic category learning (feedback or observational) undergoes subsequent enhancement during sleep. Our results suggest that after training, a good night of sleep can lead to improved performance the following day on such tasks.
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Increased sleep fragmentation leads to impaired off-line consolidation of motor memories in humans.
PLoS ONE
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A growing literature supports a role for sleep after training in long-term memory consolidation and enhancement. Consequently, interrupted sleep should result in cognitive deficits. Recent evidence from an animal study indeed showed that optimal memory consolidation during sleep requires a certain amount of uninterrupted sleep. Sleep continuity is disrupted in various medical disorders. We compared performance on a motor sequence learning task (MST) in relatively young subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (n?=?16; apnea-hypopnea index 17.1±2.6/h [SEM]) to a carefully matched control group (n?=?15, apnea-hypopnea index 3.7±0.4/h, p<0.001. Apart from AHI, oxygen nadir and arousal index, there were no significant differences between groups in total sleep time, sleep efficiency and sleep architecture as well as subjective measures of sleepiness based on standard questionnaires. In addition performance on the psychomotor vigilance task (reaction time and lapses), which is highly sensitive to sleep deprivation showed no differences as well as initial learning performance during the training phase. However there was a significant difference in the primary outcome of immediate overnight improvement on the MST between the two groups (controls?=?14.7±4%, patients?=?1.1±3.6%; P?=?0.023) as well as plateau performance (controls?=?24.0±5.3%, patients?=?10.1±2.0%; P?=?0.017) and this difference was predicted by the arousal index (p?=?0.02) rather than oxygen saturation (nadir and time below 90% saturation. Taken together, this outcome provides evidence that there is a clear minimum requirement of sleep continuity in humans to ensure optimal sleep dependent memory processes. It also provides important new information about the cognitive impact of obstructive sleep apnea and challenges its current definitions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.