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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Low and High Dietary Protein:Carbohydrate Ratios during Pregnancy Affect Materno-Fetal Glucose Metabolism in Pigs.
J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2013
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Inadequate dietary protein during pregnancy causes intrauterine growth retardation. Whether this is related to altered maternal and fetal glucose metabolism was examined in pregnant sows comparing a high-protein:low-carbohydrate diet (HP-LC; 30% protein, 39% carbohydrates) with a moderately low-protein:high-carbohydrate diet (LP-HC; 6.5% protein, 68% carbohydrates) and the isoenergetic standard diet (ST; 12.1% protein, 60% carbohydrates). During late pregnancy, maternal and umbilical glucose metabolism and fetal hepatic mRNA expression of gluconeogenic enzymes were examined. During an i.v. glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), the LP-HC-fed sows had lower insulin concentrations and area under the curve (AUC), and higher glucose:insulin ratios than the ST- and the HP-LC-fed sows (P < 0.05). Insulin sensitivity and glucose clearance were higher in the LP-HC sows compared with ST sows (P < 0.05). Glucagon concentrations during postabsorptive conditions and IVGTT, and glucose AUC during IVGTT, were higher in the HP-LC group compared with the other groups (P < 0.001). (13)C glucose oxidation was lower in the HP-LC sows than in the ST and LP-HC sows (P < 0.05). The HP-LC fetuses were lighter and had a higher brain:liver ratio than the ST group (P < 0.05). The umbilical arterial inositol concentration was greater in the HP-LC group (P < 0.05) and overall small fetuses (230-572 g) had higher values than medium and heavy fetuses (?573 g) (P < 0.05). Placental lactate release was lower in the LP-HC group than in the ST group (P < 0.05). Fetal glucose extraction tended to be lower in the LP-HC group than in the ST group (P = 0.07). In the HP-LC and LP-HC fetuses, hepatic mRNA expression of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC) was higher than in the ST fetuses (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the HP-LC and LP-HC sows adapted by reducing glucose turnover and oxidation and having higher glucose utilization, respectively. The HP-LC and LP-HC fetuses adapted via prematurely expressed hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes.
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A simplified mass isotopomer approach to estimate gluconeogenesis rate in vivo using deuterium oxide.
Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
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We compare a new simplified (2)H enrichment mass isotopomer analysis (MIA) against the laborious hexamethylentetramine (HMT) method to quantify the contribution of gluconeogenesis (GNG) to total glucose production (GP) in calves. Both methods are based on the (2)H labeling of glucose after in vivo administration of deuterium oxide. The (2)H enrichments of plasma glucose at different C-H positions were measured as aldonitrile pentaacetate (AAc) and methyloxime-trimethylsilyl (MoxTMS) derivatives or HMT by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Two pre-ruminating fasted Holstein calves (51 kg body mass, BM, age 7 days) received two oral bolus doses of (2)H(2)O (10 g/kg BM, 70 atom% (2)H) at 7:00 h and 11:00 h after overnight food withdrawal. Blood samples for fractional GNG determination were collected at -24 and between 6 and 9 h after the first (2)H(2)O dose. The ratio of (2)H enrichments C5/C2 represents the contribution of GNG to GP. The (2)H enrichment at C2 was calculated based on the ion fragments at m/z 328 (C1-C6) - m/z 187 (C3-C6) of glucose AAc. The (2)H enrichment at C5 was approximated either by averaging the (2)H enrichment at C5-C6 using the ion fragment of glucose MoxTMS at m/z 205 or by conversion of the C5 of glucose into HMT. The fractional GNG calculated by the C5-C6 average (2)H enrichment method (41.4 +/- 6.9%) compared to the HMT method (34.3 +/- 11.4%) was not different (mean +/- SD, n = 6 replicates). In conclusion, GNG can be estimated with less laborious sample preparation by means of our new C5-C6 average (2)H enrichment method using AAc and MoxTMS glucose derivatives.
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Patient mobility in the European Union: pushing for EU internal health market.
Med Law
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2009
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Having access to high-quality healthcare is a priority issue for European citizens and is recognised by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU. The right to healthcare also encompasses situations where patients travel from one EU Member State to another and receive treatment there. This paper will explore the contradictory relation between the competence of EU Member States to regulate their health systems on their own, on the one hand, and free movement of services in the European Union, on the other hand. It will discuss the consequences of the decisions of the European Court of Justice in this field and the provisions of the Proposal for a Directive on Patients Rights in Cross-Border Healthcare, especially in the light of opening up of EU Member States healthcare markets, the need to control national healthcare expenditures and to protect the welfare state and the population of the host state.
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Influence of maternal low protein diet during pregnancy on hepatic gene expression signature in juvenile female porcine offspring.
Mol Nutr Food Res
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Epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that maternal nutrition status contributes to long-term changes in the metabolic phenotype of the offspring, a process known as fetal programming.
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High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet during pregnancy alters maternal plasma amino acid concentration and placental amino acid extraction but not fetal plasma amino acids in pigs.
Br. J. Nutr.
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A high protein-low-carbohydrate diet during pregnancy can cause intra-uterine growth restriction. However, its impact during pregnancy on maternal, umbilical and fetal plasma amino acid (AA) profiles is unknown. A maternal high-protein (30 %)-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diet was compared with isoenergetic standard (12·1 % crude protein; ST) and low-protein (6·5 %)-high-carbohydrate (LP-HC) diets fed to nulliparous pregnant sows to examine changes in AA concentrations in maternal, venous and arterial umbilical and fetal plasma in mid and late pregnancy. At 64 and 94 days of pregnancy (dp), sows underwent Caesarean section, and maternal, umbilical and fetal plasma samples were collected. The HP-LC diet mainly affected maternal plasma AA concentrations. Plasma concentrations of Ile and Val were increased and those of Ala, Glu and Gly were decreased (P ? 0·05) in HP-LC compared with ST sows at 64 and 94 dp. The LP-HC diet decreased fetal plasma Glu concentration compared with the ST diet at 94 dp. Substantial AA catabolism was reflected by increased (P ? 0·05) maternal and fetal plasma urea concentrations with the HP-LC compared with the ST and LP-HC diets at 94 dp. Fractional placental extraction of Val was higher whereas those of Ala, Gln and Glu were lower in the HP-LC compared with the ST sows at 64 and 94 dp (P ? 0·05). Reduced fetal mass at 94 dp was accompanied by reduced fetal extraction of Lys and Pro in the HP-LC group (P ? 0·05). In conclusion, a maternal HP-LC diet during pregnancy altered maternal plasma composition of many AA and modified placental AA extraction to compensate for imbalanced maternal nutrient intake.
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Intrauterine growth retarded progeny of pregnant sows fed high protein:low carbohydrate diet is related to metabolic energy deficit.
PLoS ONE
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High and low protein diets fed to pregnant adolescent sows led to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). To explore underlying mechanisms, sow plasma metabolite and hormone concentrations were analyzed during different pregnancy stages and correlated with litter weight (LW) at birth, sow body weight and back fat thickness. Sows were fed diets with low (6.5%, LP), adequate (12.1%, AP), and high (30%, HP) protein levels, made isoenergetic by adjusted carbohydrate content. At -5, 24, 66, and 108 days post coitum (dpc) fasted blood was collected. At 92 dpc, diurnal metabolic profiles were determined. Fasted serum urea and plasma glucagon were higher due to the HP diet. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), %HDLC and cortisol were reduced in HP compared with AP sows. Lowest concentrations were observed for serum urea and protein, plasma insulin-like growth factor-I, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and progesterone in LP compared with AP and HP sows. Fasted plasma glucose, insulin and leptin concentrations were unchanged. Diurnal metabolic profiles showed lower glucose in HP sows whereas non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations were higher in HP compared with AP and LP sows. In HP and LP sows, urea concentrations were 300% and 60% of AP sows, respectively. Plasma total cholesterol was higher in LP than in AP and HP sows. In AP sows, LW correlated positively with insulin and insulin/glucose and negatively with glucagon/insulin at 66 dpc, whereas in HP sows LW associated positively with NEFA. In conclusion, IUGR in sows fed high protein:low carbohydrate diet was probably due to glucose and energy deficit whereas in sows with low protein:high carbohydrate diet it was possibly a response to a deficit of indispensable amino acids which impaired lipoprotein metabolism and favored maternal lipid disposal.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.