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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Antifungal activity of flavonoids isolated from mango (Mangifera indica L.) leaves.
Nat. Prod. Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2010
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Five flavonoids, namely (-)-epicatechin-3-O-?-glucopyranoside (1), 5-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxylphenyl)pyrano[3,2-g]chromene-4(8H)-one (2), 6-(p-hydroxybenzyl)taxifolin-7-O-?-D-glucoside (tricuspid) (3), quercetin-3-O-?-glucopyranosyl-(1 ? 2)-?-D-glucopyranoside (4) and (-)-epicatechin(2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromene-3,5,7-triol (5), were isolated from the leaves of mango (Mangifera indica L.). Antifungal activity of these compounds was evaluated against five fungal species, namely Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler, Aspergillus fumigatus Fresenius, Aspergillus niger van Tieghem, Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. and Penicillium citrii. Six concentrations, namely 100, 300, 500, 700, 900 and 1000 ppm of each of the five flavonoids were employed by means of the poisoned medium technique. All concentrations of the five test flavonoids significantly suppressed fungal growth. However, the specificity of different test compounds was evident against different fungal species. In general, antifungal activity of the flavonoids was gradually increased by increasing their concentrations. The highest concentration (of 1000 ppm) of compounds 1-5 reduced the growth of different target fungal species by 63-97%, 56-96%, 76-99%, 76-98% and 82-96%, respectively.
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Surface functional polymers by post-polymerization modification using diarylcarbenes: introduction, release and regeneration of hydrogen peroxide and bactericidal activity.
Langmuir
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2010
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Functionalized diarylcarbenes are excellent reactive intermediates suitable for the direct surface modification of organic polymers, and these may be used to introduce urea and thiourea functions onto polystyrene at loading levels of up to 2.3 x 10(13) molecules/cm(2). These functions are capable of the reversible binding and release of peroxide at loading levels of up to 0.6 mmol/g and give polymers that display biocidal activity against a spectrum of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.
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Dimeric supramolecular motifs of two carboxylate-guanidinium compounds.
Acta Crystallogr C
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2010
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The structures of N-benzyl-N-{6-[(4-carboxylatobenzyl)aminocarbonyl]-2-pyridylmethyl}guanidinium, C(23)H(23)N(5)O(3), (I), and N-[2-(benzylaminocarbonyl)ethyl]-N-{6-[(4-carboxylatobenzyl)aminocarbonyl]-2-pyridylmethyl}guanidinium monohydrate, C(26)H(28)N(6)O(4).H(2)O, (II), both form three-dimensional supramolecular hydrogen-bonded networks based on a dimeric primary synthon involving carboxylate-guanidinium linkages. The differences in the geometries and hydrogen-bonding connectivities are driven by the additional methylpropionamide group and water of crystallization of (II).
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Clinical utility of computed tomography screening of chest, abdomen, and sinuses before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: the St. Jude experience.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
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All allogeneic (allo) and autologous (auto) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital undergo pre-HSCT computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses, chest, and abdomen because they are at significant risk for opportunistic infections. We studied whether this extensive routine imaging is warranted to detect infection despite the risk of additional radiation exposure. We reviewed the medical records of all children receiving allo- and auto-HSCT at St. Jude in 2004 and 2005. Of the 184 eligible patients who received 187 transplants, 131 received allografts and 56 autografts. Solid tumors and lymphomas were removed from the final analysis of the chest and abdomen CT as this imaging is typically warranted as part of disease restaging; thus, 111 allogeneic participants were included in this analysis. Both auto- and allo-recipients were evaluated by sinus CT and included in this final analysis. Most allo- and auto-HSCT recipients (> or =80%) did not have sinus, pulmonary, cardiac, or gastrointestinal symptoms; >85% of the evaluable allo-recipients had no prior fungal infection. Eighty-eight allo- and 31 auto-HSCT recipients had abnormal sinus CT findings, all unrelated to the underlying disease. Sixty-two (55.9%) of the allo-recipients had normal chest CT and 85 (76.6%) had normal abdominal CT. Of the 18 allo-recipients who began new therapy based on these findings, only 2 (11.1%) were related to chest CT findings and the other 16 were related to sinus findings. Our findings suggest that pre-HSCT routine CT imaging of the abdomen may not be warranted in a subset of allogeneic recipients who are asymptomatic and without previous infectious findings. Thus, these patients may be spared unnecessary radiation exposure. Recipients undergoing auto-HSCT or allo-HSCT for lymphomas or solid tumors will routinely undergo chest and abdominal CT imaging as part of their disease evaluation. The decision to perform chest CT should be made judiciously based on a careful history and physical examination. Sinus imaging, which was frequently abnormal, may be justified in all patients to plan post-HSCT care.
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3-[(Methyl-carbamo-yl)amino]-1H-isoindolium chloride.
Acta Crystallogr Sect E Struct Rep Online
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2009
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The title compound, C(10)H(12)N(3)O(+)·Cl(-), is a derivative of o-phthaldehyde and methyl-thio-urea. The mol-ecules form dimers through intra- and inter-molecular N-H?O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are further linked into chains through one C-H?Cl and two N-H?Cl hydrogen bonds.
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4-Bromo-2-{(E)-[(3,4-dimethyl-phen-yl)imino]-meth-yl}phenol.
Acta Crystallogr Sect E Struct Rep Online
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In the title compound, C(15)H(14)BrNO, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 4.10?(11)° and the mol-ecule is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation for the non-H atoms = 0.053?Å). An intra-molecular O-H?N hydrogen bond closes an S(6) ring. In the crystal, very weak C-H?? inter-actions are observed.
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(2E)-2-(4-Hy-droxy-3-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)hydrazinecarboxamide.
Acta Crystallogr Sect E Struct Rep Online
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In the title compound, C(9)H(11)N(3)O(3), two mol-ecules are present in the asymmetric unit in which the 4-hy-droxy-3-meth-oxy-benzaldehyde and hydrazinecarboxamide units are almost planar [with r.m.s. deviations 0.0212 and 0.0066?Å, respectively, in one mol-ecule and 0.0346 and 0.0095?Å, respectively, in the other] and are oriented at dihedral angles of 9.7?(3) and 16.6?(3)°. In both mol-ecules, two S(5) ring motifs are present due to N-H?N and O-H?O hydrogen bonds. In the crystal, the mol-ecules are dimerized with each other due to pairs of N-H?O hydrogen bonds, forming an R(2) (2)(8) ring motif. O-H?O hydrogen bonds lead to the formation of a three-dimensional network.
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3-[(E)-(Pyridin-3-yl-imino)-meth-yl]phenol.
Acta Crystallogr Sect E Struct Rep Online
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Two independent mol-ecules are present in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(12)H(10)N(2)O, in which the 3-hy-droxy-benzaldehyde and the pyridin-3-amine units are almost planar [r.m.s. deviations of 0.0236 and 0.0116Å, respectively, in one mol-ecule and 0.0245 and 0.0162Å, respectively, in the other] and are oriented at dihedral angles of 7.21?(7) and 14.77?(7)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules of the same type form inversion dimers via pairs of O-H?N hydrogen bonds, forming R(2) (2)(20) ring motifs. There exist ?-? inter-actions between the benzene and pyridine rings of molecules of the same type with centroid-centroid distances of 3.7127?(10) and 3.8439?(10)?Å.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.