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Draft Genome Sequence of Haloferax sp. Strain ATB1, Isolated from a Semi-Arid Region in the Brazilian Caatinga.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Organisms in the Haloferax genus are extreme halophiles that grow in environments with pH values between 4 and 12, and temperatures between 0°C and 60°C. In the present study, a draft of the first Haloferax sp. strain ATB1 genome isolated from the region of Cariri (in Paraíba State, Brazil) is presented.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain BrMgv02-JM63, a Chitinolytic Bacterium Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Mangrove Soil in Brazil.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the automatic annotation of Bacillus thuringiensis strain BrMgv02-JM63. This genome comprises a set of genes involved in the metabolism of chitin and N-acetylglucosamine utilization, thus suggesting the possible role of this strain in the cycling of organic matter in mangrove soils.
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Endo- and exoglucanase activities in bacteria from mangrove sediment.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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The mangrove ecosystem is an unexplored source for biotechnological applications. In this unique environment, endemic bacteria have the ability to thrive in the harsh environmental conditions (salinity and anaerobiosis), and act in the degradation of organic matter, promoting nutrient cycles. Thus, this study aimed to assess the cellulolytic activities of bacterial groups present in the sediment from a mangrove located in Ilha do Cardoso (SP, Brazil). To optimize the isolation of cellulolytic bacteria, enrichments in two types of culture media (tryptone broth and minimum salt medium), both supplemented with 5% NaCl and 1% of cellulose, were performed. Tests conducted with the obtained colonies showed a higher occurrence of endoglycolytic activity (33 isolates) than exoglycolytic (19 isolates), and the degradation activity was shown to be modulated by the presence of NaCl. The isolated bacteria were clustered by BOX-PCR and further classified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequences as Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of studies focusing on the endemic species found in mangroves to exploit them as novel biotechnological tools for the degradation of cellulose.
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Effects of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Biofilm formation depends on several factors. The influence of different osmolarities on bacterial biofilm formation was studied. Two strains (Enterobacter sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp.) exhibited the most remarkable alterations. Biofilm formation is an important trait and its use has been associated to the protection of organisms against environmental stresses.
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Screening of endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the saline rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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In screening the culturable endoglucanase-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere of Rhizophora mangle, we found a prevalence of genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. These bacteria revealed different activities in endoglucolysis and biofilm formation when exposed to specific NaCl concentrations, indicating modulated growth under natural variations in mangrove salinity.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain CMAA 1215, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from a Brazilian Mangrove.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2013
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The aim of this study was to sequence the genome of the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas sp. strain CMAA 1215, an osmotolerant bacterium isolated from mangrove soil.
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Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing of Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain P27, a Highly Radiation-Resistant Actinomycete from Antarctica.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2013
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Here, we report the draft genome sequence of radiation-resistant Rhodococcus erythropolis strain P27, isolated from leaves of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) in the Admiralty Bay area, Antarctica.
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Sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing communities in Brazilian mangrove sediments.
Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2013
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Mangrove soils are anaerobic environments rich in sulphate and organic matter. Although the sulphur cycle is one of the major actors in this ecosystem, little is known regarding the sulphur bacteria communities in mangrove soils. We investigated the abundance, composition and diversity of sulphur-oxidizing (SOB) and sulphate-reducing (SRB) bacteria in sediments from three Brazilian mangrove communities: two contaminated, one with oil (OilMgv) and one with urban waste and sludge (AntMgv), and one pristine (PrsMgv). The community structures were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and clone libraries, using genes for the enzymes adenosine-5-phosphosulphate reductase (aprA) and sulphite reductase (Dsr) (dsrB). The abundance for qPCR showed the ratio dsrB/aprA to be variable among mangroves and higher according to the gradient observed for oil contamination in the OilMgv. The PCR-DGGE patterns analysed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling revealed differences among the structures of the three mangrove communities. The clone libraries showed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the most abundant groups associated with sulphur cycling in mangrove sediments. We conclude that the microbial SOB and SRB communities in mangrove soils are different in each mangrove forest and that such microbial communities could possibly be used as a proxy for contamination in mangrove forests.
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Isolation and Characterization of Phytotoxic Compounds Produced by Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 from Red Mangrove (Rhizophora mangle).
Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2013
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Natural products produced by microorganisms have been utilized as sources of new drugs possessing a wide range of agrochemical and pharmacological activities. During our research on Actinomycetes from Brazilian mangroves, the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 isolated from the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) rhizosphere produced a highly active compound against the microalga Chlorella vulgaris, often used to assess the phytotoxic activity. As a result, the bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of the mixture of the known compounds bafilomycin B1 and bafilomycin B2. The chemical structures of bafilomycin B1 and bafilomycin B2 were established based on their spectroscopic data by infrared (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gradient-enhanced heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), and gradient-enhanced heteronuclear multiple-bond connectivity (gHMBC) as well as comparison with reference data from the literature. Moreover, it was also possible to identify other bafilomycins using non-chromatographic-dependent techniques (Tandem mass spectrometry). Additionally, this is the first report on the phytotoxic activity of bafilomycin B1.
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Brazilian Microbiome Project: Revealing the Unexplored Microbial Diversity-Challenges and Prospects.
Microb. Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2013
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The Brazilian Microbiome Project (BMP) aims to assemble a Brazilian Metagenomic Consortium/Database. At present, many metagenomic projects underway in Brazil are widely known. Our goal in this initiative is to co-ordinate and standardize these together with new projects to come. It is estimated that Brazil hosts approximately 20 % of the entire worlds macroorganism biological diversity. It is 1 of the 17 countries that share nearly 70 % of the worlds catalogued animal and plant species, and is recognized as one of the most megadiverse countries. At the end of 2012, Brazil has joined GBIF (Global Biodiversity Information Facility), as associated member, to improve the access to the Brazilian biodiversity data in a free and open way. This was an important step toward increasing international collaboration and clearly shows the commitment of the Brazilian government in directing national policies toward sustainable development. Despite its importance, the Brazilian microbial diversity is still considered to be largely unknown, and it is clear that to maintain ecosystem dynamics and to sustainably manage land use, it is crucial to understand the biological and functional diversity of the system. This is the first attempt to collect and collate information about Brazilian microbial genetic and functional diversity in a systematic and holistic manner. The success of the BMP depends on a massive collaborative effort of both the Brazilian and international scientific communities, and therefore, we invite all colleagues to participate in this project.
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Polyphasic evidence supporting the reclassification of Bradyrhizobium japonicum group Ia strains as Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens sp. nov.
Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2013
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Bradyrhizobium japonicum was described from soybean root-nodule bacterial isolates. Since its description, several studies have revealed heterogeneities among rhizobia assigned to this species. Strains assigned to B. japonicum group Ia have been isolated in several countries, and many of them are outstanding soybean symbionts used in inoculants worldwide, but they have also been isolated from other legume hosts. Here, we summarize published studies that indicate that group Ia strains are different from the B. japonicum type strain USDA 6(T) and closely related strains, and present new morphophysiological, genotypic and genomic evidence to support their reclassification into a novel species, for which the name Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the novel species is the well-studied strain USDA 110(T) (?=IAM 13628(T) ?=CCRC 13528(T) ?=NRRL B-4361(T) ?=NRRL B-4450(T) ?=TAL 102(T) ?=BCRC 13528(T) ?=JCM 10833(T) ?=TISTR 339(T) ?=SEMIA 5032(T) ?=3I1B110(T) ?=ACCC 15034(T) ?=CCT 4249(T) ?=?NBRC 14792(T) ?=?R-12974(T) ?=?CNPSo 46(T)).
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Streptomyces araujoniae sp. nov.: an actinomycete isolated from a potato tubercle.
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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The taxonomic position of a streptomycete isolated from a potato tubercle was determined by using a polyphasic approach. The organism had chemotaxonomic and morphological properties consistent with its classification in the genus Streptomyces and formed a distinct phyletic line in the Streptomyces 16S rRNA gene tree. It was found to be closely related to Streptomyces celluloflavus NRRL B-2493(T) (99.4 % 16S rRNA gene similarity) and shared a 99.0 % 16S rRNA gene similarity value with Streptomyces albolongus NRRL B-3604(T) and Streptomyces cavourensis subsp. cavourensis NBRC 13026(T); low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness with these organisms showed that the isolate belonged to a distinct genomic species. The isolate was distinguished readily from the type strains of these species using a combination of morphological and other phenotypic properties. On the basis of these results, it is proposed that isolate ASBV-1(T) (= CBMAI 1465(T) = CCMA 894(T) = NRRL B-24922(T)) be classified as the type strain of Streptomyces araujoniae sp. nov.
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Species diversity of culturable endophytic fungi from Brazilian mangrove forests.
Curr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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This study aimed to perform a comparative analysis of the diversity of endophytic fungal communities isolated from the leaves and branches of Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa trees inhabiting two mangroves in the state of São Paulo, Brazil [Cananeia and Bertioga (oil spill-affected and unaffected)] in the summer and winter. Three hundred and forty-three fungi were identified by sequencing the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of rDNA. Differences were observed in the frequencies of fungi isolated from the leaves and branches of these three different plant species sampled from the Bertioga oil spill-affected and the oil-unaffected mangrove sites in the summer and winter; these differences indicate a potential impact on fungal diversity in the study area due to the oil spill. The molecular identification of the fungi showed that the fungal community associated with these mangroves is composed of at least 34 different genera, the most frequent of which were Diaporthe, Colletotrichum, Fusarium, Trichoderma and Xylaria. The Shannon and the Chao1 indices [H(95 %) = 4.00, H(97 %) = 4.22, Chao1(95 %) = 204 and Chao1(97 %) = 603] indicated that the mangrove fungal community possesses a vast diversity and richness of endophytic fungi. The data generated in this study revealed a large reservoir of fungal genetic diversity inhabiting these Brazilian mangrove forests and highlighted substantial differences between the fungal communities associated with distinct plant tissues, plant species, impacted sites and sampling seasons.
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Microbial community biogeographic patterns in the rhizosphere of two Brazilian semi-arid leguminous trees.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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Arid environments are regular and well distributed over all continents and display drought characteristics whether full-time or seasonal. This study aims to characterize how the microbial communities of the rhizosphere of two leguminous trees from the Brazilian semi-arid biome the Caatinga are geographically and seasonally shaped, as well as the factors driving this variation. With that purpose, the soil rhizosphere from two leguminous trees (Mimosa tenuiflora and Piptadenia stipulacea (Benth.) Ducke) were sampled in two different seasons: rainy and drought at five different sites. Assessment of bacterial and archaeal communities occurred by T-RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA and archaeal amoA genes. By these means, it was observed that the seasons (wet and dry periods) are the factors that most influence the composition of the microbial community from both analyzed plants, except for the results obtained from the CCA applied to Archaeas. Furthermore, soil physical-chemical factors also had a significant influence on the community and indicated a geographical pattern of the bacterial community. It was not possible to observe significant modifications in the composition in relation to the plant species. We have seen that soil characteristics and rainfall were the factors that most influenced the microbial composition. Also, the bacterial community had a significant correlation with soil characteristics that indicates that these rhizosphere communities might be selected by environmental characteristics. Furthermore, the data suggest that climate plays a key role in structuring the microbial community of this biome.
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Water regime influences bulk soil and Rhizosphere of Cereus jamacaru bacterial communities in the Brazilian Caatinga biome.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We used the T-RFLP technique combined with Ion Torrent (PGM) sequencing of 16S rRNA and multivariate analysis to study the structure of bulk soil and rhizosphere bacterial communities of a cactus, Cereus jamacaru, from the Brazilian Caatinga biome, which is unique to Brazil. The availability of water shapes the rhizosphere communities, resulting in different patterns during the rainy and dry seasons. Taxonomic approaches and statistical analysis revealed that the phylum Actinobacteria strongly correlated with the dry season, while samples from the rainy season exhibited a strong correlation with the phylum Proteobacteria for rhizosphere samples and with the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Lentisphaerae, and Tenericutes for bulk soil samples. The STAMP software also indicated that the phylum Bacteroidetes, as well as two classes in the Proteobacteria phylum (? and ?), were the most significant ones during the rainy season. The average abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria and the genus Bacillus was significantly greater during the dry season. Some significant genera found during the dry season might reflect their tolerance to the extreme conditions found in the Caatinga biome. They may also indicate the ecological function that microorganisms play in providing plants with some degree of tolerance to water stress or in assisting in their development through mechanisms of growth promotion. Alterations in microbial communities can be due to the different abilities of native microorganisms to resist and adapt to environmental changes.
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Screening of Brazilian cacti rhizobacteria for plant growth promotion under drought.
Microbiol. Res.
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Drought is one of the major problems worldwide. The search for new and efficient microorganisms, from unexplored environments, to be used in association with plants to alleviate the negative effects imposed by water stress, is an interesting alternative. Thus, cacti-associated bacteria from the Brazilian semi-arid region were isolated based on their ability to grow in medium with reduced water availability. Strains were tested for the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS), as well as in vitro plant growth promotion traits. A great proportion of the isolates belong to the genus Bacillus. From a total of forty-eight bacteria, 65% were able to grow in medium with reduced water availability (0.919Aw), exopolysaccharide production was observed for 65% of the strains. The production of indole acetic acid (IAA) exceeding 51?gmL(-1) was observed for 4% and the high solubilization of Ca-P was verified for 6% of the isolates. No strain was able to produce hydrogen cyanide (HCN), 71% produced ammonia and 79% showed a halo of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) degradation. Zea mays L. growth promotion under water stress (30% of field capacity) was achieved by two strains of Bacillus spp. This is the first report to describe cacti-associated bacteria from Brazilian semi-arid with plant growth-promoting abilities.
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Endophytic bacteria isolated from orchid and their potential to promote plant growth.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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Twelve endophytic bacteria were isolated from the meristem of in vitro Cymbidium eburneum orchid, and screened according to indole yield quantified by colorimetric assay, in vitro phosphate solubilization, and potential for plant growth promotion under greenhouse conditions. Eight strains with positive results were classified into the genus Paenibacillus by FAME profile, and evaluated for their ability to increase survival and promote the growth of in vitro germinated Cattleya loddigesii seedlings during the acclimatization process. The obtained results showed that all strains produced detectable indole levels and did not exhibit potential for solubilizing inorganic phosphate. Particularly, an increase of the total biomass and number of leaves was observed. Two strains of Paenibacillus macerans promoted plant growth under greenhouse conditions. None of the treatments had a deleterious effect on growth of inoculated plants. These results suggest that these bacterial effects could be potentially useful to promote plant growth during seedling acclimatization in orchid species other than the species of origin.
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Cellulolytic bacteria from soils in harsh environments.
World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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It is believed that the exposure of organisms to harsh climate conditions may select for differential enzymatic activities, making the surviving organisms a very promising source for bioprospecting. Soil bacteria play an important role in degradation of organic matter, which is mostly due to their ability to decompose cellulose-based materials. This work focuses on the isolation and identification of cellulolytic bacteria from soil found in two environments with stressful climate conditions (Antarctica and the Brazilian semi-arid caatinga). Cellulolytic bacteria were selected using enrichments at high and low temperatures (4 or 60°C) in liquid media (trypic soy broth-TSB and minimum salt medium-MM) supplemented with cellulose (1%). Many of the isolates (119 out of 254-46.9%) displayed the ability to degrade carboxymethyl-cellulose, indicating the presence of endoglucolytic activity, while only a minority of these isolates (23 out of 254-9.1%) showed exoglucolytic activity (degradation of avicel). The obtained isolates revealed a preferential endoglucolytic activity according to the temperature of enrichments. Also, the identification of some isolates by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the Bacteroidetes (e.g., Pedobacter, Chryseobacterium and Flavobacterium) were the main phylum of cellulolytic bacteria isolated from soil in Antarctica; the Firmicutes (e.g., Bacillus) were more commonly isolated from samples from the caatinga; and Actinobacteria were found in both types of soil (e.g., Microbacterium and Arthrobacter). In conclusion, this work reports the isolation of bacteria able to degrade cellulose-based material from soil at very low or very high temperatures, a finding that should be further explored in the search for cellulolytic enzymes to be used in the bioenergy industry.
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The microbiome of Brazilian mangrove sediments as revealed by metagenomics.
PLoS ONE
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Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04) in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H(2)S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments.
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Cyanobacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of a mangrove forest.
FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
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The cyanobacterial community colonizing phyllosphere in a well-preserved Brazilian mangrove ecosystem was assessed using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Leaves of trees that occupy this environment (Rhizophora mangle,Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa) were collected along a transect beginning at the margin of the bay and extending upland. The results demonstrated that the phyllosphere of R. mangle and L. racemosa harbor similar assemblages of cyanobacteria at each point along the transect. A. schaueriana, found only in the coastal portions of the transect, was colonized by assemblages with lower richness than the other trees. However, the results indicated that spatial location was a stronger driver of cyanobacterial community composition than plant species. Distinct cyanobacterial communities were observed at each location along the coast-to-upland transect. Clone library analysis allowed identification of 19 genera of cyanobacteria and demonstrated the presence of several uncultivated taxa. A predominance of sequences affiliated with the orders Nostocales and Oscillatoriales was observed, with a remarkable number of sequences similar to genera Symphyonemopsis/Brasilonema (order Nostocales). The results demonstrated that phyllosphere cyanobacteria in this mangrove forest ecosystem are influenced by environmental conditions as the primary driver at the ecosystem scale, with tree species exerting some effect on community structure at the local scale.
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Interspecific variation of the bacterial community structure in the phyllosphere of the three major plant components of mangrove forests.
Braz. J. Microbiol.
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Mangrove forests encompass a group of trees species that inhabit the intertidal zones, where soil is characterized by the high salinity and low availability of oxygen. The phyllosphere of these trees represent the habitat provided on the aboveground parts of plants, supporting in a global scale, a large and complex microbial community. The structure of phyllosphere communities reflects immigration, survival and growth of microbial colonizers, which is influenced by numerous environmental factors in addition to leaf physical and chemical properties. Here, a combination of culture-base methods with PCR-DGGE was applied to test whether local or plant specific factors shape the bacterial community of the phyllosphere from three plant species (Avicenia shaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle), found in two mangroves. The number of bacteria in the phyllosphere of these plants varied between 3.62 x 10(4) in A. schaeriana and 6.26 x 10(3) in R. mangle. The results obtained by PCR-DGGE and isolation approaches were congruent and demonstrated that each plant species harbor specific bacterial communities in their leaves surfaces. Moreover, the ordination of environmental factors (mangrove and plant species), by redundancy analysis (RDA), also indicated that the selection exerted by plant species is higher than mangrove location on bacterial communities at phyllosphere.
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