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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Recalling the threat: dental anxiety in patients waiting for dental surgery.
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2013
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Objective: The tendency of patients with high levels of anxiety to easily recall threatening stimuli has not been examined in relation to dental anxiety. The current study was aimed to examine the effect of pre-treatment anxiety levels and of information given prior to dentistry surgical procedures on free recall of threatening words. Methods: Forty-two subjects attending a private dental clinic were recruited. While awaiting root-canal treatment or tooth extraction, patients were asked to proofread a list of 32 words, which contained mental and physical threat-related words, as well as positive and neutral words. only half of the subjects received information on the forthcoming surgical procedure. Pre-treatment anxiety levels using the dental anxiety Scale (daS) and word recall were evaluated. Results:only subjects with high dental anxiety (above median score) recalled more mental and physical threatrelated words, than positive words. Moreover, the dental anxiety score as a continuous variable predicted the mean number of mental threat-related words recalled. no significant differences were noted between those who did or did not receive information prior to the surgical procedures, on the recall of the four types of words. Conclusions:Similar to other anxiety disorders, patients with dental anxiety display a tendency for free recall of threatening stimuli presented to them before a threatening event. Preliminary information given prior to dentistry surgical procedures does not decrease anxiety. Suggestions for intervention in the dentists clinic are given.
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Decreased serotonin content and reduced agonist-induced aggregation in platelets of patients chronically medicated with SSRI drugs.
J Affect Disord
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2011
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Chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) reduces the risk and severity of cardiovascular diseases. SSRIs block the serotonin transporter, thereby inhibiting serotonin (5-HT) uptake into presynaptic neurons as well as into platelets where 5-HT is stored in dense granules. When 5-HT is released in response to agonists it enhances platelet aggregation induced by injury-related signals. Chronic administration of SSRIs may thus reduce platelet aggregability secondary to depletion of platelets serotonin stores.
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Shyness and social phobia in Israeli Jewish vs Arab students.
Compr Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Social anxiety disorder (SAD) has been repeatedly shown to be very prevalent in the Western society with prevalence rates of 10% or above. However, very few studies have been performed in the Middle East and in Arab countries.
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Anti-ribosomal P antibody in schizophrenia.
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Background: A series of epidemiological, clinical and laboratory findings suggest an autoimmune process in schizophrenia and include, among others, high titers of various autoantibodies in the sera of patients. Antiribosomal P antibody is known to exist in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with a psychiatric presentation, including psychosis, rationalizing the examination of its existence in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Sera of 59 patients, 48 diagnosed with schizophrenia and 11 diagnosed with a schizoaffective disorder, were examined for the presence of antiribosomal P antibody titers using ELISA. The control group consisted of 94 healthy subjects with similar age and gender distribution. Results: Anti-ribosomal P antibody titers were below cut-off level in 58 patients and borderline in one patient, similar to the low titers of the control group. Conclusions: Previous investigations have demonstrated high specificity for anti-ribosomal P antibody in SLE patients with psychosis. In view of the results of this study, however, anti-ribosomal P antibody is not a biological marker for schizophrenia.
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The relationship between type of insurance, time period and length of stay in psychiatric hospitals: the Israeli case.
Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2010
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According to the current standard of practice in modern medicine, medical decision-making is often forced to comply with stipulations of the insurance provider. In the field of psychiatry, there has been a trend of shortened psychiatric hospitalizations which some have suggested may be due to pressures related to insurance coverage. In Israel, soldiers have comprehensive medical coverage provided by the military, and this coverage includes full payment for psychiatric hospitalizations. In contrast, Israeli civilians are insured by the government according to a global payment system. In this study, we aimed to examine differences between these two groups in terms of length of stay (LOS) in psychiatric hospitals.
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Impulsivity, aggression and suicide risk among male schizophrenia patients.
Psychopathology
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2010
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Impulsivity has been shown to be a major variable in the etiology of suicide and aggression, but has not been researched as much in the schizophrenic population, which is characterized by serious suicide and aggression risks.
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Staff attitudes toward patients with borderline personality disorder.
Compr Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2010
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Our aims were (1) to develop 2 inventories for the measurement of cognitive and emotional attitudes toward borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients and their treatment and (2) to use these tools to understand and compare attitudes of psychiatrists, psychologists, and nurses toward BPD patients.
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Escitalopram in the treatment of negative symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2010
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Antidepressant medication treatment has been associated with improvement in negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of escitalopram for the treatment of negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Under double-blind conditions, 40 patients with chronic schizophrenia were randomized to add-on treatment with escitalopram (up to 20mg) or placebo for 10weeks. The primary outcome measures were the scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-negative subscale and the Social Functioning Scale (SFS). Secondary outcome measures included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-total and positive scales, the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). Of 40 patients, 36 completed the study and another 2 were excluded after 8weeks due to side effects. Thus, 38 patients (19 on both treatment arms) were considered in the efficacy analysis. The reduction in the PANSS negative subscale score was 5% for escitalopram and 10% for placebo (NS). There were no significant inter-group differences in primary and secondary endpoints. Escitalopram was well tolerated, but was not more effective than placebo in the treatment of negative symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Further work in this field is needed to determine whether some subgroups of patients with negative symptoms may nevertheless respond to antidepressant medications.
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A comparison of life events in patients with unipolar disorder or bipolar disorder and controls.
Compr Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2009
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The present study aimed to explore the association between stressful life events (LEs) and the development of affective psychopathology.
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Diminished neural sensitivity to irregular facial expression in first-episode schizophrenia.
Hum Brain Mapp
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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Blunted, inappropriate affective-social behavior is a hallmark of early schizophrenia, possibly corresponding to reduced ability to recognize and express emotions. It is yet unknown if this affective deficiency relates to disturbed neural sensitivity to facial expressions or to overall face processing. In a previous imaging study, healthy subjects showed less suppression of the fusiform gyrus (FG) to repeated presentation of the same transfigured-bizarre face relative to regular face. We assumed that the FG in schizophrenia will show reduced repetition related sensitivity to transfigured-bizarre faces, while having overall normal response to faces.
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Exposure to antidepressant medications and suicide attempts in adult depressed inpatients.
J. Nerv. Ment. Dis.
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The effects of antidepressant medication on suicide risk remain unclear. This study explores any association between antidepressant medication and suicide attempts leading to hospitalization in adult depressed patients.The medical records of 103 patients admitted after a suicide attempt were examined and compared with those of a matched control group of depressed patients (n = 103) admitted without suicide attempts as well as a patient group with and without suicide attempts on separate hospitalizations (n = 25). No significant difference in antidepressant medication exposure before hospitalization was found between groups. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure was higher in patients with suicide attempts, albeit nonsignificant, but was identical in patients admitted on two occasions with and without suicide attempts. The most common method for suicide attempt was drug overdose (52.4%). Patients in the group with suicide attempts had significantly more past suicide attempts. Study results do not confirm any relationship between antidepressants and suicide attempts. Close monitoring of depressed patients is advised especially in early treatment.
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Can Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 predict response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in depressed outpatients?
Int Clin Psychopharmacol
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There is growing evidence that individual differences among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) on psychological and demographic measures may predict the therapeutic response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). In this retrospective chart review, 108 outpatients with current major depressive episodes were treated with citalopram, paroxetine, or fluvoxamine. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 were administered before and after 8 weeks of SSRIs treatment. Clinical response was defined as a 50% or greater decrease in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score (final visit minus baseline). This naturalistic short-term follow-up outcome study demonstrates that among depressive outpatients who responded to an 8-week trial, 57.4% achieved a good response to SSRIs. Statistical analysis showed that SSRI treatment may be 3.03 times more advantageous for MDD outpatients who are younger than 39 years. The patients with an elevated score of above 66T on the Social Introversion Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale are approximately 0.37 times as likely to be SSRI responders as are patients with a Social Introversion score less than 66T. Thus, it seems that in MDD outpatient age is the strongest predictor of response to SSRIs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.