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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Increase in age is associated with worse outcomes in alveolar bone grafting in patients with bilateral complete cleft palate.
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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This prospective study aimed at evaluating the surgical outcomes of alveolar bone grafting (ABG) in subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate treated at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil, by means of cone-beam computed tomography. Twenty-five patients with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, resulting in 50 clefts, were analyzed. Subjects were divided into 2 groups according to the dentition status at the time of surgery: (1) SABG group: subjects with mixed dentition operated on before or immediately after eruption of the permanent canine (10-13 years); (2) TABG group: subjects with permanent dentition (15-23 years). Cone-beam computed tomography analysis was performed in the buccal, intermediate, and palatal views, 2 and 6 to 12 months postoperatively. In the SABG group, 96% of the grafts were classified as successful, and no failure cases were observed. In the TABG group, successful cases decreased to 65%, and failures were seen in 27% of the cleft sites. In both postoperative periods, significantly better outcomes (lower mean scores) were observed for the SABG group in all the cone-beam computed tomography views (P < 0.05). Results show that the timing of surgery is an important factor in determining the outcomes of ABG in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate, with increasing age being associated with the worse outcomes.
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Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies/USP (HRAC/USP) - Part 5: institutional outcomes assessment and the role of the Laboratory of Physiology.
J Appl Oral Sci
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2013
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The Laboratory of Physiology provides support for the diagnosis of functional disorders associated with cleft lip and palate and also conducts studies to assess, objectively, the institutional outcomes, as recommended by the World Health Organization. The Laboratory is conceptually divided into three units, namely the Unit for Upper Airway Studies, Unit for Stomatognathic System Studies and the Unit for Sleep Studies, which aims at analyzing the impact of different surgical and dental procedures on the upper airways, stomatognathic system and the quality of sleep of individuals with cleft lip and palate. This paper describes the main goals of the Laboratory in the assessment of procedures which constitute the basis of the rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate, i.e., Plastic Surgery, Orthodontics and Maxillofacial Surgery and Speech Pathology.
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Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies/USP (HRAC/USP) - Part 4: oral rehabilitation.
J Appl Oral Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2013
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Treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate is completed with fixed prostheses, removable, total, implants and aims to restore aesthetics, phonetics and function and should be guided by the basic principles of oral rehabilitation, such as physiology, stability, aesthetics, hygiene and the expectations of the patient. In order to obtain longevity of a prosthetic rehabilitation, the periodontal and dental tissue as well as the biomechanics of the prosthesis are to be respected. The purpose of this article is to describe the types of prosthetics treatment, which are performed at HRAC/USP for the rehabilitation of cleft area in adult patients.
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Bioglass associated with leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma in the rabbit maxillary sinus: histomorphometric, densitometric, and fractal analysis.
J Oral Implantol
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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The objective of the present study was to evaluate the outcomes of autogenous bone graft (AB) and bioglass (BG) associated or not with leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma (LP-PRP) in the rabbit maxillary sinus (MS) by histomorphometric and radiographic analysis. Twenty rabbits divided into 2 groups (G1, G2) were submitted to sinus lift surgery. In G1, 10 MS were grafted with AB and 10 MS were grafted with BG. In G2, 10 MS were grafted with AB + LP-PRP and 10 MS were grafted with BG + LP-PRP. After 90 days, the animals were killed and specimens were obtained, x-rayed, and submitted to histomorphometric, radiographic bone density (RD) and fractal dimension analysis. Radiographic bone density mean values (SD), expressed as aluminum equivalent in mm, of AB, BG, AB + LP-PRP, and BG + LP-PRP groups were 1.79 (0.31), 2.04 (0.39), 1.61 (0.28), and 1.53 (0.30), respectively. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed between BG and AB, and BG + PRP and BG. Fractal dimension mean values were 1.48 (0.04), 1.35 (0.08), 1.44 (0.04), and 1.44 (0.06), respectively. Significant differences were observed between BG and AB, and AB + LP-PRP and BG. Mean values for the percentage of bone inside MS were 63.30 (8.60), 52.65 (10.41), 55.25 (7.01), and 51.07 (10.25), respectively. No differences were found. No correlations were observed among percentage of bone, RD and FD. Histological analysis showed that MS treated with AB presented mature and new bone formation. The other groups showed minor bone formation. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicated that at a 90-day time end point, AB yielded better results than AB + LP-PRP, BG, and BG + LP-PRP and should be considered the primary material for MS augmentation.
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Effect of diabetes mellitus and insulin therapy on bone density around osseointegrated dental implants: a digital subtraction radiography study in rats.
Clin Oral Implants Res
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2009
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To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) and insulin therapy on bone density around osseointegrated dental implants by digital subtraction radiography (DSR).
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Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-USP (HRAC-USP)--part 3: oral and maxillofacial surgery.
J Appl Oral Sci
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This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face.
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Timing of alveolar bone grafting determines different outcomes in patients with unilateral cleft palate.
J Craniofac Surg
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The objective of the current study was to assess the outcome of the alveolar bone grafting (ABG) in patients with cleft palate. Thirty-one patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate were prospectively divided into 2 groups according to the timing of surgery: (1) secondary ABG (SABG), undertaken during mixed dentition (n = 16); and (2) tertiary ABG (TABG), undertaken during permanent dentition (n = 15). Septum height was assessed using cone beam computed tomography in 3 views (buccal, intermediate, palatal) and classified according to the modified Bergland Index, which scores the results into 5 types according to the height of the neoformed bone septum (excellent: septum with a normal height; good: septum with minor deficiency; regular: marginal defect of >25% of the root length; bad: bone deficiency on the nasal aspect; and failure). In the SABG group, 6 to 12 months postoperatively, 75% of the patients were classified as having excellent/good conditions and 25% as having regular/bad conditions. No patients were observed as having failure conditions. In the TABG group, 53% of the patients were classified as having excellent/good, 21% were classified as having regular/bad conditions, and 26% were classified as having failure conditions. Significantly better outcomes were observed for the SABG group when compared with the TABG group. In conclusion, the age at which ABG is performed is a factor that impacts on the surgical outcome. Specifically, increasing age is associated with worse outcomes.
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Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-USP (HRAC-USP)--part 2: pediatric dentistry and orthodontics.
J Appl Oral Sci
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The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP). Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP). At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics.
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Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences.
J Appl Oral Sci
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Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.
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Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies/USP (HRAC/USP)--Part 1: overall aspects.
J Appl Oral Sci
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Cleft lip and palate is the most common among craniofacial malformations and causes several esthetic and functional implications that require rehabilitation. This paper aims to generally describe the several aspects related to this complex pathology and the treatment protocol used by the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP) along 40 years of experience in the treatment of individuals with cleft lip and palate.
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