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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Extrinsic Finger and Thumb Muscles Command a Virtual Hand to Allow Individual Finger and Grasp Control.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
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Fine-wire intramuscular electrodes were used to obtain EMG signals from six extrinsic hand muscles associated with the thumb, index, and middle fingers. Subjects' EMG activity was used to control a virtual three-DOF hand as they conformed the hand to a sequence of hand postures testing two controllers: direct EMG control and pattern recognition control. Subjects tested two conditions using each controller: starting the hand from a pre-defined neutral posture before each new posture and starting the hand from the previous posture in the sequence. Subjects demonstrated their ability to simultaneously, yet individually, move all three DOFs during the direct EMG control trials, however results showed subjects did not often utilize this feature. Performance metrics such as failure rate and completion time showed no significant difference between the two controllers.
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Activation of individual extrinsic thumb muscles and compartments of extrinsic finger muscles.
J. Neurophysiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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Mechanical and neurological couplings exist between musculotendon units of the human hand and digits. Studies have begun to understand how these muscles interact when accomplishing everyday tasks, but there are still unanswered questions regarding the control limitations of individual muscles. Using intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) electrodes, this study examined subjects ability to individually initiate and sustain three levels of normalized muscular activity in the index and middle finger muscle compartments of extensor digitorum communis (EDC), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as the extrinsic thumb muscles abductor pollicis longus (APL), extensor pollicis brevis (EPB), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and flexor pollicis longus (FPL). The index and middle finger compartments each sustained activations with significantly different levels of coactivity from the other finger muscle compartments. The middle finger compartment of EDC was the exception. Only two extrinsic thumb muscles, EPL and FPL, were capable of sustaining individual activations from the other thumb muscles, at all tested activity levels. Activation of APL was achieved at 20 and 30% MVC activity levels with significantly different levels of coactivity. Activation of EPB elicited coactivity levels from EPL and APL that were not significantly different. These results suggest that most finger muscle compartments receive unique motor commands, but of the four thumb muscles, only EPL and FPL were capable of individually activating. This work is encouraging for the neural control of prosthetic limbs because these muscles and compartments may potentially serve as additional user inputs to command prostheses.
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Quantification of isolated muscle compartment activity in extrinsic finger muscles for potential prosthesis control sites.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Prosthetic hands are becoming more advanced and gaining degrees-of-freedom similar to their human counterparts. However, the command interface enabling control of these prostheses needs to be improved for more intuitive functional use. One barrier to using electromyographic (EMG) signals as the command interface is measuring independent muscle control sites in the residual limb. Surface electrodes are commonly used to detect muscle activity in the forearm; however, the measured signals are often comprised of EMG signals from multiple muscles that are close together. This study investigated the suitability of the index and middle finger compartments of the extrinsic muscles as control sites for prostheses using a direct myocontrol interface. Fine-wire intramuscular electrodes were inserted into seven subjects and their ability to achieve isolated activations of each compartment was tested. The results showed five of the six compartments yield signals suitable for independent volitional control. The middle finger compartment of extensor digitorum communis was found to be incapable of isolated contractions and is therefore not recommended as a control site for direct myocontrol prostheses. A cross-correlation threshold was used to verify that simultaneously measured EMG signals were free from crosstalk and were therefore attributed to muscle co-activations.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.