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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
AIDS-related mycoses: the way forward.
Trends Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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The contribution of fungal infections to the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected individuals is largely unrecognized. A recent meeting highlighted several priorities that need to be urgently addressed, including improved epidemiological surveillance, increased availability of existing diagnostics and drugs, more training in the field of medical mycology, and better funding for research and provision of treatment, particularly in developing countries.
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A cross-reactive monoclonal antibody to nematode haemoglobin enhances protective immune responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
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Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection.
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Nippostrongylus-induced intestinal hypercontractility requires IL-4 receptor alpha-responsiveness by T cells in mice.
PLoS ONE
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Gut-dwelling helminthes induce potent IL-4 and IL-13 dominated type 2 T helper cell (T(H)2) immune responses, with IL-13 production being essential for Nippostrongylus brasiliensis expulsion. This T(H)2 response results in intestinal inflammation associated with local infiltration by T cells and macrophages. The resulting increased IL-4/IL-13 intestinal milieu drives goblet cell hyperplasia, alternative macrophage activation and smooth muscle cell hypercontraction. In this study we investigated how IL-4-promoted T cells contributed to the parasite induced effects in the intestine. This was achieved using pan T cell-specific IL-4 receptor alpha-deficient mice (iLck(cre)IL-4R?(-/lox)) and IL-4R?-responsive control mice. Global IL-4R?(-/-) mice showed, as expected, impaired type 2 immunity to N. brasiliensis. Infected T cell-specific IL-4R?-deficient mice showed comparable worm expulsion, goblet cell hyperplasia and IgE responses to control mice. However, impaired IL-4-promoted T(H)2 cells in T cell-specific IL-4R? deficient mice led to strikingly reduced IL-4 production by mesenteric lymph node CD4(+) T cells and reduced intestinal IL-4 and IL-13 levels, compared to control mice. This reduced IL-4/IL-13 response was associated with an impaired IL-4/IL-13-mediated smooth muscle cell hypercontractility, similar to that seen in global IL-4R?(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that IL-4-promoted T cell responses are not required for the resolution of a primary N. brasiliensis infection. However, they do contribute significantly to an important physiological manifestation of helminth infection; namely intestinal smooth muscle cell-driven hypercontractility.
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Signaling C-Type lectin receptors, microbial recognition and immunity.
Cell. Microbiol.
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Signaling C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are crucial in shaping the immune response to fungal pathogens, but comparably little is known about the role of these receptors in bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. CLRs have many diverse functions depending on the signaling motifs in their cytoplasmic domains, and can induce endocytic, phagocytic, antimicrobial, pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses which are either protective or not during an infection. Understanding the role of CLRs in shaping anti-microbial immunity offers great potential for the future development of therapeutics for disease intervention. In this review we will focus on the recognition of bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens by CLRs, and how these receptors influence the outcome of infection. We will also provide a brief update on the role of CLRs in antifungal immunity.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.