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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The effects of ACT treatment and TS prophylaxis on Plasmodium falciparum gametocytemia in a cohort of young Ugandan children.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TS) prophylaxis are important tools for malaria control, but there are concerns about their effect on gametocytes, the stage of the parasite responsible for transmission. We conducted a longitudinal clinical trial in a cohort of HIV-infected and uninfected children living in an area of high malaria transmission intensity in Uganda. Study participants were randomized to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) for all treatments of uncomplicated malaria (N = 4,380) as well as TS prophylaxis for different durations. The risks of gametocytemia detected by microscopy in the 28 days after antimalarial therapy were compared using multivariate analyses. The risk of gametocyte detection was significantly higher in patients treated with DP compared with AL (adjusted relative risk = 1.85, P < 0.001) and among children prescribed TS prophylaxis (adjusted relative risk = 1.76, P < 0.001). The risk of gametocytemia and its potential for increasing transmission should be considered when evaluating different ACTs and TS prophylaxis for malaria control.
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High PMTCT program uptake and coverage of mothers, their partners, and babies in northern Uganda: achievements and lessons learned over 10 years of implementation (2002-2011).
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The international nongovernmental organization "AVSI Foundation" has been actively supporting Ugandas Ministry of Health (MoH) prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) program since 2002 in 4 districts of the conflict-ridden Acholi subregion in Northern Uganda.
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Virologic suppression in nevirapine-exposed HIV-infected infants initiating antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda.
J. Trop. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 09-19-2011
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We measured virologic suppression among 34 nevirapine (NVP)-exposed HIV-infected children with median age of 8.6 months (range: 3.2-19.9) initiating NVP-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) in rural Uganda. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the cumulative probability of virologic suppression, defined as having two consecutive HIV-1 RNA <400 copies ml(-1) by 18 months was 56%. In multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling, the following pre-ART measurements were independently associated with an increased probability of viral suppression: increasing age [hazard ratio (HR) =1.28 per 1 month increase in age, p?=?0.002], lower viral load (HR?=?3.54 for HIV RNA?>?7?50?000 copies ml(-1), p?=?0.03) and high CD4% (HR?=?6.0 for CD4%?>?25, p?=?0.003). These results lend additional support to the 2010 World Health Organization recommendations that protease inhibitors be used to treat NVP-exposed children, but that NVP-based ART should be initiated before the decline of CD4% to optimize outcomes in NVP-exposed children when protease inhibitors are not available.
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Protective efficacy of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis against malaria in HIV exposed children in rural Uganda: a randomised clinical trial.
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2011
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To evaluate the protective efficacy of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis against malaria in HIV exposed children (uninfected children born to HIV infected mothers) in Africa.
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Pregnancy comes accidentally--like it did with me: reproductive decisions among women on ART and their partners in rural Uganda.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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As highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) restores health, fertility and sexual activity among HIV-infected adults, understanding how ART influences reproductive desires and decisions could inform interventions to reduce sexual and vertical HIV transmission risk.
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Breastfeeding and the risk of malaria in children born to HIV-infected and uninfected mothers in rural Uganda.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2010
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Early cessation of breastfeeding increases morbidity and mortality of children born to HIV-infected mothers in resource-limited settings. However, data on whether breastfeeding reduces the risk of malaria in HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children is limited.
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Artemether-lumefantrine versus dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for falciparum malaria: a longitudinal, randomized trial in young Ugandan children.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2009
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Artemisinin-based combination therapies are now widely recommended as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. However, which therapies are optimal is a matter of debate. We aimed to compare the short- and longer-term efficacy of 2 leading therapies in a cohort of young Ugandan children.
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Cost-effectiveness of routine rapid human immunodeficiency virus antibody testing before DNA-PCR testing for early diagnosis of infants in resource-limited settings.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2009
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Infants born to HIV-infected women should receive HIV testing to allow early diagnosis and treatment. Recommendations for resource-limited settings stress laboratory-based virologic assays. While effective, these tests are logistically complex and expensive. This study explored the cost-effectiveness of incorporating initial screening with rapid HIV tests (RHT) into the conventional testing algorithm to screen-out HIV-uninfected infants, thereby reducing the need for costly virologic testing.
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Safety and tolerability of artemether-lumefantrine versus dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for malaria in young HIV-infected and uninfected children.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2009
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Artemisinin combination therapy has become the standard of care for uncomplicated malaria in most of Africa. However, there is limited data on the safety and tolerability of these drugs, especially in young children and patients co-infected with HIV.
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Reproductive intentions and outcomes among women on antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda: a prospective cohort study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
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Antiretroviral therapy (ART) may influence the biological, social and behavioral determinants of pregnancy in HIV-infected women. However, there are limited longitudinal data on the reproductive intentions and outcomes among women on ART in Africa. METHODOLOGY /PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a prospective cohort design, we analyzed trends in desire for children and predictors of pregnancy among a cohort of 733 HIV-infected women in rural Uganda who initiated ART between May 2003 and May 2004 and were followed up in their homes until June 2006. Women answered in-depth social and behavioral questionnaires administered every quarter in year 1 after initiating ART, and every 6 to 12 months thereafter. Use of family planning methods was assessed at 18 and 24 months after starting ART. We tested for non-constant pregnancy incidence by using a shape parameter test from the Weibull distribution. We modeled repeated measurements of all variables related to the womens desire for children over time using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) extension to the logistic regression model. Risk factors for pregnancy were examined using Cox proportional hazards model. 711 women eligible for the study were followed-up for a median time of 2.4 years after starting ART. During this time, less than 7% of women reported wanting more children at any time point yet 120 (16.9%) women experienced 140 pregnancies and pregnancy incidence increased from 3.46 per 100 women-years (WY) in the first quarter to 9.5 per 100 WY at 24 months (p<0.0001). This was paralleled by an increase in the proportion of women reporting sexual activity in the past 3 months, from 24.4% at baseline to 32.5% over 24 months of follow-up (p = 0.001). Only 14% of women used permanent or semi-permanent family planning methods by their second year on ART. In the multivariate model, younger age (HR = 2.71 per 10-year decrease, 95% CI: 2.95-3.78), having a BMI>18.5 (HR = 1.09, CI: 1.01-1.18) and not having used condoms consistently in the last 3 months (HR = 1.79, CI: 1.02-3.13) were independently associated with pregnancy.
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The association between malnutrition and the incidence of malaria among young HIV-infected and -uninfected Ugandan children: a prospective study.
Malar. J.
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In sub-Saharan Africa, malnutrition and malaria remain major causes of morbidity and mortality in young children. There are conflicting data as to whether malnutrition is associated with an increased or decreased risk of malaria. In addition, data are limited on the potential interaction between HIV infection and the association between malnutrition and the risk of malaria.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.