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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
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Safety Assessment of Animal- and Plant-Derived Amino Acids as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of animal- and plant-derived amino acid mixtures, which function as skin and hair conditioning agents. The safety of ?-amino acids as direct food additives has been well established, based on extensive research through acute and chronic dietary exposures and the Panel previously has reviewed the safety of individual ?-amino acids in cosmetics. The Panel focused its review on dermal irritation and sensitization data relevant to the use of these ingredients in topical cosmetics. The Panel concluded that these 21 ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as used in cosmetics.
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Amended safety assessment of hypericum perforatum-derived ingredients as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) has issued an amended safety assessment of 7 Hypericum perforatum-derived ingredients as used in cosmetics. A common name for this plant is St John wort. These ingredients function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous and antimicrobial agents. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the H perforatum-derived ingredients. Because formulators may use more than 1 botanical ingredient in a formulation, caution was urged to avoid levels of toxicological concern for constituent chemicals and impurities. The Panel concluded that H perforatum-derived ingredients were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as described in this safety assessment.
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Safety Assessment of Vitis vinifera (Grape)-Derived Ingredients as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 24 Vitis vinifera (grape)-derived ingredients and found them safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetics. These ingredients function in cosmetics mostly as skin-conditioning agents, but some function as antioxidants, flavoring agents, and/or colorants. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data to determine the safety of these ingredients. Additionally, some constituents of grapes have been assessed previously for safety as cosmetic ingredients by the Panel, and others are compounds that have been discussed in previous Panel safety assessments.
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Safety assessment of modified terephthalate polymers as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The safety of 6 modified terephthalate polymers as cosmetic ingredients was assessed. These ingredients mostly function as exfoliants, bulking agents, hair fixatives, and viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is used in leave-on products up to 100% and in rinse-off products up to 2%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered that the PET used in cosmetics is chemically equivalent to that used in medical devices. The Panel determined that the Food and Drug Administration's determination of safety of PET in several medical devices, which included human and animal safety data, can be used as the basis for the determination of safety of PET and related polymers used in cosmetics. Use studies of cosmetic eye products that contain PET demonstrated no ocular irritation or dermal sensitization. The Panel concluded that modified terephthalate polymers were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of 6-hydroxyindole as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 10-10-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6-hydroxyindole, which functions as an oxidative hair dye ingredient. The Panel considered relevant animal and human data provided in this safety assessment and concluded that 6-hydroxyindole is safe for use in oxidative hair dye formulations.
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Safety Assessment of PEGylated Oils as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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PEGylated oil is a terminology used to describe cosmetic ingredients that are the etherification and esterification products of glycerides and fatty acids with ethylene oxide. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered the safety of PEGylated oils, which function primarily as surfactants in cosmetic products. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data provided in this safety assessment and concluded that the 130 chemically related PEGylated oils were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating.
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Anti-MET ImmunoPET for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Novel Fully Human Antibody Fragments.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2014
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MET, the receptor of hepatocyte growth factor, plays important roles in tumorigenesis and drug resistance in numerous cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As increasing numbers of MET inhibitors are being developed for clinical applications, antibody fragment-based immunopositron emission tomography (immunoPET) has the potential to rapidly quantify in vivo MET expression levels for drug response evaluation and patient stratification for these targeted therapies. Here, fully human single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) isolated from a phage display library were reformatted into bivalent cys-diabodies (scFv-cys dimers) with affinities to MET ranging from 0.7 to 5.1 nmol/L. The candidate with the highest affinity, H2, was radiolabeled with (89)Zr for immunoPET studies targeting NSCLC xenografts: low MET-expressing Hcc827 and the gefitinib-resistant Hcc827-GR6 with 4-fold MET overexpression. ImmunoPET at as early as 4 hours after injection produced high-contrast images, and ex vivo biodistribution analysis at 20 hours after injection showed about 2-fold difference in tracer uptake levels between the parental and resistant tumors (P < 0.01). Further immunoPET studies using a larger fragment, the H2 minibody (scFv-CH3 dimer), produced similar results at later time points. Two of the antibody clones (H2 and H5) showed in vitro growth inhibitory effects on MET-dependent gefitinib-resistant cell lines, whereas no effects were observed on resistant lines lacking MET activation. In conclusion, these fully human antibody fragments inhibit MET-dependent cancer cells and enable rapid immunoPET imaging to assess MET expression levels, showing potential for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Mol Cancer Ther; 13(11); 2607-17. ©2014 AACR.
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Development of an ELISA microarray assay for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of ten biodefense toxins.
Analyst
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2014
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Plant and microbial toxins are considered bioterrorism threat agents because of their extreme toxicity and/or ease of availability. Additionally, some of these toxins are increasingly responsible for accidental food poisonings. The current study utilized an ELISA-based protein antibody microarray for the multiplexed detection of ten biothreat toxins, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) A, B, C, D, E, F, ricin, shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx), and staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), in buffer and complex biological matrices. The multiplexed assay displayed a sensitivity of 1.3 pg mL(-1) (BoNT/A, BoNT/B, SEB, Stx-1 and Stx-2), 3.3 pg mL(-1) (BoNT/C, BoNT/E, BoNT/F) and 8.2 pg mL(-1) (BoNT/D, ricin). All assays demonstrated high accuracy (75-120 percent recovery) and reproducibility (most coefficients of variation <20%). Quantification curves for the ten toxins were also evaluated in clinical samples (serum, plasma, nasal fluid, saliva, stool, and urine) and environmental samples (apple juice, milk and baby food) with overall minimal matrix effects. The multiplex assays were highly specific, with little cross-reactivity observed between the selected toxin antibodies. The results demonstrate a multiplex microarray that improves current immunoassay sensitivity for biological warfare agents in buffer, clinical, and environmental samples.
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Enhanced immunoPET of ALCAM-positive colorectal carcinoma using site-specific 64Cu-DOTA conjugation.
Protein Eng. Des. Sel.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2014
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Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is an immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule that is aberrantly expressed in a wide variety of human tumors, including melanoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, colorectal carcinoma, bladder cancer and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This wide spectrum of human malignancies makes ALCAM a prospective pan-cancer immunoPET target to aid in detection and diagnosis in multiple malignancies. In this study, we assess site-specific versus non-site-specific conjugation strategies for (64)Cu-DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) immunoPET imaging of a fully human ALCAM cys-diabody (cDb) with a reduced linker length that retains its bivalent binding ability. ALCAM constructs with linker lengths of eight, five and three amino acids were produced to make true non-covalent site-specifically modified cDbs. Characterization by gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography, flow cytometry and mass spectrometry of the various constructs was performed. To demonstrate the increased utility of targeting multiple malignancies expressing ALCAM, we compare the targeting of the site-specific versus non-site-specific conjugated cDbs to the human colorectal cancer xenograft LS174T. Interestingly, the conjugation strategy not only affects tumor targeting but also hepatic and renal uptake/clearance.
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Selective targeting of TGF-? activation to treat fibroinflammatory airway disease.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2014
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Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-? is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin ?v?8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-? and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin ?v?8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human ?v?8 (B5) inhibited TGF-? activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-? activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that ?v?8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity ?v?8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-? pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases.
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Safety Assessment of Dimethicone Crosspolymers as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 62 dimethicone crosspolymer ingredients as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as absorbents, bulking agents, film formers, hair-conditioning agents, emollient skin-conditioning agents, slip modifiers, surface modifiers, and nonaqueous viscosity-increasing agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data related to these polymers and addressed the issue of residual monomers. The Panel concluded that these dimethicone crosspolymer ingredients are safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.
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Safety Assessment of Chlorphenesin as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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Chlorphenesin functions as a biocide in cosmetics and is used at concentrations up to 0.32% in rinse-off products and up to 0.3% in leave-on products. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) noted that chlorphenesin was well absorbed when applied to the skin of rats; however, any safety concern was minimized because available data demonstrated an absence of toxicity. The Panel concluded that chlorphenesin is safe in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Safety Assessment of Cucumis sativus (Cucumber)-Derived Ingredients as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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The CIR Expert Panel assessed the safety of 6 Cucumis sativus (cucumber)-derived ingredients and found them safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. These ingredients are reported to function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents. Cucumber is a commonly consumed food with no history of significant adverse effects, suggesting that its ingredients should not pose any major safety issues following oral exposure. This assessment focused on the dermal exposure to the low concentrations of these ingredients as used in cosmetics. Some of the constituents of cucumbers have been assessed previously for safe use as cosmetic ingredients.
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Safety Assessment of Citric Acid, Inorganic Citrate Salts, and Alkyl Citrate Esters as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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The CIR Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of citric acid, 12 inorganic citrate salts, and 20 alkyl citrate esters as used in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration. Citric acid is reported to function as a pH adjuster, chelating agent, or fragrance ingredient. Some of the salts are also reported to function as chelating agents, and a number of the citrates are reported to function as skin-conditioning agents but other functions are also reported. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data, but because citric acid, calcium citrate, ferric citrate, manganese citrate, potassium citrate, sodium citrate, diammonium citrate, isopropyl citrate, stearyl citrate, and triethyl citrate are generally recognized as safe direct food additives, dermal exposure was the focus for these ingredients in this cosmetic ingredient safety assessment.
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The critical link between health care and jails.
Health Aff (Millwood)
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2014
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As a group, jail-involved individuals, which we define here as people with a history of arrest and jail admission in the recent past, carry a heavy illness burden, with high rates of infectious and chronic disease as well as mental illness and substance use. Because these people have tended to also be uninsured, jail frequently has been their only regular source of health care. Three thousand three hundred local and county jails processed 11.6 million admissions during the twelve-month period ending midyear 2012. The Urban Institute estimated as much as 30 percent of some local corrections budgets is allocated to inmate health care services. This investment is largely lost when people are released back into the community, where they typically do not get treatment. For people with untreated substance use or mental illness, this issue reaches beyond public health, because without treatment, these people are at heightened risk of cycling into and out of jail for low-level, nonviolent offenses. This article offers eight policy recommendations to build a continuum of care that will ensure that jail-involved people get the care they need, regardless of where they reside. With the expansion of Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, there is now a critical opportunity to bring the jail-involved population into the mainstream health care system, which benefits the health care and criminal justice systems and society at large.
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Identifying blood-brain-barrier selective single-chain antibody fragments.
Biotechnol J
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents an obstacle in targeting and delivering therapeutics to the central nervous system. In order to discover new BBB-targeting molecules, we panned a phage-displayed nonimmune human single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) library against a representative BBB model comprised of hydrocortisone-treated primary rat brain endothelial cells. Parallel screens were performed with or without pre-subtraction against primary rat heart and lung endothelial cells in an effort to identify antibodies that may have binding selectivity toward brain endothelial cells. After three rounds of screening, three unique scFvs, scFv15, scFv38, and scFv29, were identified that maintained binding to primary rat brain endothelial cells, both in phage and soluble scFv format. While scFv29 and to a lesser extent, scFv15, exhibited some brain endothelial cell specificity in tissue culture, scFv29 did not appear to bind a BBB antigen in vivo. In contrast, both scFv15 and scFv38 were capable of immunolabeling rat brain vessels in vivo and displayed brain vascular selectivity with respect to all peripheral organs tested other than heart. Taken together, scFv15 and scFv38 represent two new antibodies that are capable of binding antigens that are expressed at the BBB in vivo.
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Identification of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 receptor binding site in botulinum neurotoxin A.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) inhibit neurotransmitter release by hydrolysing SNARE proteins. The most important serotype BoNT/A employs the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) isoforms A-C as neuronal receptors. Here, we identified their binding site by blocking SV2 interaction using monoclonal antibodies with characterised epitopes within the cell binding domain (HC). The site is located on the backside of the conserved ganglioside binding pocket at the interface of the HCC and HCN subdomains. The dimension of the binding pocket was characterised in detail by site directed mutagenesis allowing the development of potent inhibitors as well as modifying receptor binding properties.
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Combining Anti-ERBB3 Antibodies Specific for Domain I and Domain III Enhances the Anti-Tumor Activity over the Individual Monoclonal Antibodies.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Inappropriate signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor family (EGFR1/ERBB1, ERBB2/HER2, ERBB3/HER3, and ERBB4/HER4) of receptor tyrosine kinases leads to unregulated activation of multiple downstream signaling pathways that are linked to cancer formation and progression. In particular, ERBB3 plays a critical role in linking ERBB signaling to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt signaling pathway and increased levels of ERBB3-dependent signaling is also increasingly recognized as a mechanism for acquired resistance to ERBB-targeted therapies.
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High throughput identification of monoclonal antibodies to membrane bound and secreted proteins using yeast and phage display.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Antibodies are ubiquitous and essential reagents for biomedical research. Uses of antibodies include quantifying proteins, identifying the temporal and spatial pattern of expression in cells and tissue, and determining how proteins function under normal or pathological conditions. Specific antibodies are only available for a small portion of the proteome, limiting study of those proteins for which antibodies do not exist. The technologies to generate target-specific antibodies need to be improved to obtain high quality antibodies to the proteome at reasonable cost. Here we show that renewable, validated, and standardized monoclonal antibodies can be generated at high throughput, without the need for antigen production or animal immunizations. In this study, 60 protein domains from 24 selected secreted proteins were expressed on the surface of yeast and used for selection of phage antibodies, over 400 monoclonal antibodies were identified within 3 weeks. A subset of these antibodies was validated for binding to cancer cells that overexpress the target protein by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry. This approach will be applicable to many of the membrane-bound and the secreted proteins, 20-40% of the proteome, accelerating the timeline for Ab generation while reducing the cost.
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Amended safety assessment of formaldehyde and methylene glycol as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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Formaldehyde and methylene glycol may be used safely in cosmetics if established limits are not exceeded and are safe for use in nail hardeners in the present practices of use and concentration, which include instructions to avoid skin contact. In hair-smoothing products, however, in the present practices of use and concentration, formaldehyde and methylene glycol are unsafe. Methylene glycol is continuously converted to formaldehyde, and vice versa, even at equilibrium, which can be easily shifted by heating, drying, and other conditions to increase the amount of formaldehyde. This rapid, reversible formaldehyde/methylene glycol equilibrium is distinguished from the slow, irreversible release of formaldehyde resulting from the so-called formaldehyde releaser preservatives, which are not addressed in this safety assessment (formaldehyde releasers may continue to be safely used in cosmetics at the levels established in their individual Cosmetic Ingredient Review safety assessments).
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Safety Assessment of ?-Amino Acids as Used in Cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of ?-amino acids, which function primarily as hair- and skin-conditioning agents in cosmetic products. The safety of ?-amino acids as direct food additives has been well established based on extensive research through acute and chronic dietary exposures. The Panel focused its review on dermal irritation and sensitization data relevant to the use of these ingredients in topical cosmetics. The Panel concluded that ?-amino acids were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration of this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of ammonium hectorites as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 4 ammonium hectorite compounds used in cosmetics: disteardimonium hectorite, dihydrogenated tallow benzylmonium hectorite, stearalkonium hectorite, and quaternium-18 hectorite. These ingredients function in cosmetics mainly as nonsurfactant suspending agents. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data and concluded that these ammonium hectorite compounds were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of borosilicate glasses as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of calcium sodium borosilicate, calcium aluminum borosilicate, calcium titanium borosilicate, silver borosilicate, and zinc borosilicate as used in cosmetics. These borosilicate glasses function mostly as bulking agents. Available animal and human data were considered along with data from a previous safety assessment of magnesium silicates. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. Data submitted on calcium borosilicate, which is not a cosmetic ingredient, are also included as additional support for the safety of borosilicate glass ingredients. The Panel concluded that borosilicate glasses are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of alkyl glyceryl ethers as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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Alkyl glyceryl ethers function mostly as skin-conditioning agents in cosmetic products applied to the skin and hair. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review expert panel reviewed the available animal toxicity and clinical data, including the low dermal absorption, and concluded that the alkyl glyceryl ethers are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.
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Safety assessment of bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-2 and bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-1 as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-2 and bis-diglyceryl polyacyladipate-1 as used in cosmetics, finding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. Both ingredients are lanolin substitutes and are reported to function in cosmetics as skin-conditioning agents--emollients. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety.
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Safety assessment of lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate as used in cosmetics. These ingredients function in cosmetics as hair-conditioning agents and surfactant-cleansing agents. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics. The Panel concluded that lauriminodipropionic acid, sodium lauriminodipropionate, and disodium lauriminodipropionate are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Safety assessment of decyl glucoside and other alkyl glucosides as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel assessed the safety of 19 alkyl glucosides as used in cosmetics and concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating. Most of these ingredients function as surfactants in cosmetics, but some have additional functions as skin-conditioning agents, hair-conditioning agents, or emulsion stabilizers. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data on these ingredients. Since glucoside hydrolases in human skin are likely to break down these ingredients to release their respective fatty acids and glucose, the Panel also reviewed CIR reports on the safety of fatty alcohols and were able to extrapolate data from those previous reports to support safety.
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Positive patch test reactions to carba mix and iodopropynyl butylcarbamate: data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 1998-2008.
Dermatitis
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2013
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Carba mix (CM) contains 3 chemicals used as accelerators in manufacturing of rubber products and agricultural chemicals. Iodopropynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC) is a preservative used in industrial and personal care products. Potential cross-reactivity between these allergens is unclear.
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RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin.
Talanta
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2013
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A surface plasmon resonance based RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin is reported. Using detoxified recombinant type A botulinum neurotoxin as the surrogate, the aptasensor detects active toxin within 90 min. The detection limit of the aptasensor in phosphate buffered saline, carrot juice, and fat free milk is 5.8 ng/ml, 20.3 ng/ml and 23.4 ng/ml, respectively, while that in 5-fold diluted human serum is 22.5 ng/ml. Recovery of toxin from disparate sample matrices are within 91-116%. Most significant is the ability of this aptasensor to effectively differentiate the natively folded toxin from denatured, inactive toxin, which is important for homeland security surveillance and threat assessment. The aptasensor is stable for more than 30 days and over 400 injections/regeneration cycles. Such an aptasensor holds great promise for rapid detection of active botulinum neurotoxin for field surveillance due to its robustness, stability and reusability.
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Safety assessment of silylates and surface-modified siloxysilicates.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel assessed the safety of silica silylate, silica dimethyl silylate, trimethylsiloxysilicate, and trifluoropropyldimethyl/trimethylsiloxysilicate as used in cosmetics. These silylates and surface-modified siloxysilicates function in cosmetics as antifoaming agents, anticaking agents, bulking agents, binders, skin-conditioning agents--emollient, skin-conditioning agents-occlusive, slip modifiers, suspension agents--nonsurfactant, and viscosity increasing agents--nonaqueous. The Expert Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data as well as information from a previous CIR safety assessment of amorphous silica. The CIR Expert Panel concluded that silica silylate, silica dimethyl silylate, trimethylsiloxysilicate, and trifluoropropyldimethyl/trimethylsiloxysilicate are safe as used when formulated and delivered in the final product not to be irritating or sensitizing to the respiratory tract.
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Safety assessment of triethanolamine and triethanolamine-containing ingredients as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of triethanolamine (TEA) and 31 related TEA-containing ingredients as used in cosmetics. The TEA is reported to function as a surfactant or pH adjuster; the related TEA-containing ingredients included in this safety assessment are reported to function as surfactants and hair- or skin-conditioning agents. The exception is TEA-sorbate, which is reported to function as a preservative. The Panel reviewed the available animal and clinical data. Although data were not available for all the ingredients, the panel relied on the information available for TEA in conjunction with previous safety assessments of components of TEA-containing ingredients. These data could be extrapolated to support the safety of all included ingredients. The panel concluded that TEA and related TEA-containing ingredients named in this report are safe as used when formulated to be nonirritating. These ingredients should not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds can be formed.
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Safety assessment of diethanolamides as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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Cocamide diethanolamine (DEA) and some of the other diethanolamides are mainly used as surfactant foam boosters or viscosity increasing agents in cosmetics, although a few are reported to be used as hair and skin conditioning agents, surfactant-cleansing or surfactant-emulsifying agents, or as an opacifying agent. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel considered new data and information from previous CIR reports to assess the concerns about the potential for amidases in human skin to convert these diethanolamides into DEA and the corresponding fatty acids. The Expert Panel concluded that these diethanolamides are safe as used when formulated to be nonirritating and when the levels of free DEA in the diethanolamides do not exceed those considered safe by the Panel. The Panel also recommended that these ingredients not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds can be formed.
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Safety assessment of 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole and 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole and its salt, 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate, are used as coupling agents in oxidative hair dyes. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the ingredient. The Expert Panel concluded that 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole and 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate are safe for use in oxidative hair dye formulations. The Expert Panel cautioned that these ingredients should not be used in cosmetic products in which N-nitroso compounds may be formed.
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Identification of the SV2 protein receptor-binding site of botulinum neurotoxin type E.
Biochem. J.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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The highly specific binding and uptake of BoNTs (botulinum neurotoxins; A-G) into peripheral cholinergic motoneurons turns them into the most poisonous substances known. Interaction with gangliosides accumulates the neurotoxins on the plasma membrane and binding to a synaptic vesicle membrane protein leads to neurotoxin endocytosis. SV2 (synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2) mediates the uptake of BoNT/A and /E, whereas Syt (synaptotagmin) is responsible for the endocytosis of BoNT/B and /G. The Syt-binding site of the former was identified by co-crystallization and mutational analyses. In the present study we report the identification of the SV2-binding interface of BoNT/E. Mutations interfering with SV2 binding were located at a site that corresponds to the Syt-binding site of BoNT/B and at an extended surface area located on the back of the conserved ganglioside-binding site, comprising the N- and C-terminal half of the BoNT/E-binding domain. Mutations impairing the affinity also reduced the neurotoxicity of full-length BoNT/E at mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm preparations demonstrating the crucial role of the identified binding interface. Furthermore, we show that a monoclonal antibody neutralizes BoNT/E activity because it directly interferes with the BoNT/E-SV2 interaction. The results of the present study suggest a novel mode of binding for BoNTs that exploit SV2 as a cell surface receptor.
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Use of a new functional dual coating (FDC) assay to measure low toxin levels in serum and food samples following an outbreak of human botulism.
J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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Clostridium botulinum type A toxin is the most prevalent cause of naturally occurring outbreaks of human botulism in the world. The active dichain neurotoxin molecule is composed of a heavy chain (H-chain) of ~100 kDa with the carboxy-terminal end consisting of a receptor-binding (HC) domain, while the amino-terminal (HN) domain is linked by a critical disulfide bond to a light chain (L-chain) of ~50 kDa. Although the mouse bioassay (MBA) is traditionally used to confirm the presence of toxin in serum or food, its sensitivity is insufficient to detect low toxin levels in approximately 30 to 60?% of botulism patients. A novel FDC (functional dual coating) microtitre plate immuno-biochemical assay, which quantifies botulinum toxicity by measuring the HC domain linked with L-chain endopeptidase activity, was modified to allow human serum (lysed or unlysed) to be tested without interference from the matrix, with toxin detection down to 0.03 mouse LD50 per ml serum or 0.13 pg ml(-1) using just 100 µl of clinical samples. The assay was specific for type A toxin and could additionally be applied to whole blood and food samples. Low levels of 1 to 2 mouse LD50 per ml serum of type A toxin were quantified for the first time using the modified FDC assay in two severely intoxicated UK patients who required mechanical ventilation and antitoxin. Toxin levels in recovered food sample extracts were also detected and one MBA-negative sample was found to contain 0.32 LD50 per ml extract. The FDC assay provides a real alternative for public health laboratories to unambiguously confirm all cases of type A botulism and, due to its sensitivity, a promising new tool in toxin pharmacokinetic studies.
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North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010.
Dermatitis
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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Patch testing is an important diagnostic tool for determination of substances responsible for allergic contact dermatitis.
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North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results for 2007-2008.
Dermatitis
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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The North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) tests patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis to a broad series of screening allergens and publishes periodic reports.
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Safety assessment of xylene sulfonic acid, toluene sulfonic acid, and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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Xylene sulfonic acid, toluene sulfonic acid, and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes used in cosmetics as surfactants, hydrotropes, were reviewed in this safety assessment. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to these ingredients. The panel concluded that xylene sulfonic acid and alkyl aryl sulfonate hydrotropes are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentrations as described in this safety assessment, when formulated to be nonirritating.
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Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel on the safety assessment of pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid) and nonanoate esters.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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Pelargonic acid and its esters function as skin-conditioning agents in cosmetics. Molecular weight (mw) and octanol-water partition coefficient data suggest that dermal penetration is possible. The biohandling of branched-chain fatty acids is not the same as for straight-chain fatty acids, but the differences are not significant to the conclusion that they all are readily metabolized to nontoxic moieties. Limited data suggested that the penetration of other ingredients may be enhanced if these ingredients are present in the same formulation. These ingredients are not significant oral or dermal toxicants in animal studies. They are not reproductive/developmental toxicants or genotoxic/carcinogenic in animal studies. The available data suggested that product formulations containing these ingredients would be nonirritating and nonsensitizing to human skin, but formulators were cautioned to consider the penetration enhancement potential. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Safety assessment of cyclomethicone, cyclotetrasiloxane, cyclopentasiloxane, cyclohexasiloxane, and cycloheptasiloxane.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2011
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Cyclomethicone (mixture) and the specific chain length cyclic siloxanes (n = 4-7) reviewed in this safety assessment are cyclic dimethyl polysiloxane compounds. These ingredients have the skin/hair conditioning agent function in common. Minimal percutaneous absorption was associated with these ingredients and the available data do not suggest skin irritation or sensitization potential. Also, it is not likely that dermal exposure to these ingredients from cosmetics would cause significant systemic exposure. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration.
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Single-chain antibody-based immunotoxins targeting Her2/neu: design optimization and impact of affinity on antitumor efficacy and off-target toxicity.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2011
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Recombinant immunotoxins, consisting of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) genetically fused to polypeptide toxins, represent potentially effective candidates for cancer therapeutics. We evaluated the affinity of various anti-Her2/neu scFv fused to recombinant gelonin (rGel) and its effect on antitumor efficacy and off-target toxicity. A series of rGel-based immunotoxins were created from the human anti-Her2/neu scFv C6.5 and various affinity mutants (designated ML3-9, MH3-B1, and B1D3) with affinities ranging from 10(-8) to 10(-11) mol/L. Against Her2/neu-overexpressing tumor cells, immunotoxins with increasing affinity displayed improved internalization and enhanced autophagic cytotoxicity. Targeting indices were highest for the highest affinity B1D3/rGel construct. However, the addition of free Her2/neu extracellular domain (ECD) significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of B1D3/rGel because of immune complex formation. In contrast, ECD addition had little impact on the lower affinity constructs in vitro. In vivo studies against established BT474 M1 xenografts showed growth suppression by all immunotoxins. Surprisingly, therapy with the B1D3-rGel induced significant liver toxicity because of immune complex formation with shed Her2/neu antigen in circulation. The MH3-B1/rGel construct with intermediate affinity showed effective tumor growth inhibition without inducing hepatotoxicity or complex formation. These findings show that while high-affinity constructs can be potent antitumor agents, they may also be associated with mistargeting through the facile formation of complexes with soluble antigen leading to significant off-target toxicity. Constructs composed of intermediate-affinity antibodies are also potent agents that are more resistant to immune complex formation. Therefore, affinity is an exceptionally important consideration when evaluating the design and efficacy of targeted therapeutics.
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Final report of the Amended Safety Assessment of PVM/MA copolymer and its related salts and esters as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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Polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid (PVM/MA) copolymer, and its related salts and esters, are used in cosmetics, mainly as binders, film formers, and hair fixatives. Animal and human data relevant to the use of these ingredients in cosmetic products were reviewed by the CIR Expert Panel. The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe for use in cosmetic products.
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Community development efforts offer a major opportunity to advance Americans health.
Health Aff (Millwood)
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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Large differences in the opportunities and resources that Americans have to be healthy have led to sizable variations in health by geography, race and ethnicity, income level, and education. By enhancing the opportunities for good health in the places where we live, learn, work, play, and worship, community development initiatives can be important drivers of improved health. As articles in this months issue of Health Affairs attest, community development and public health are two forces that often have the same goals. Because there has been little research to date documenting which aspects of community development could have the greatest impact on health, it will be increasingly necessary to rigorously evaluate the impact of various interventions to guide policy makers in identifying the most important measures to take in an environment of constrained financial resources.
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Affinity maturation to improve human monoclonal antibody neutralization potency and breadth against hepatitis C virus.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2011
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A potent neutralizing antibody to a conserved hepatitis C virus (HCV) epitope might overcome its extreme variability, allowing immunotherapy. The human monoclonal antibody HC-1 recognizes a conformational epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein. Previous studies showed that HC-1 neutralizes most HCV genotypes but has modest potency. To improve neutralization, we affinity-matured HC-1 by constructing a library of yeast-displayed HC-1 single chain Fv (scFv) mutants, using for selection an E2 antigen from one of the poorly neutralized HCVpp. We developed an approach by parallel mutagenesis of the heavy chain variable (VH) and ?-chain variable (Vk) genes separately, then combining the optimized VH and Vk mutants. This resulted in the generation of HC-1-related scFv variants exhibiting improved affinities. The best scFv variant had a 92-fold improved affinity. After conversion to IgG1, some of the antibodies exhibited a 30-fold improvement in neutralization activity. Both surface plasmon resonance and solution kinetic exclusion analysis showed that the increase in affinity was largely due to a lowering of the dissociation rate constant, Koff. Neutralization against a panel of HCV pseudoparticles and infectious 2a HCV virus improved with the affinity-matured IgG1 antibodies. Interestingly, some of these antibodies neutralized a viral isolate that was not neutralized by wild-type HC-1. Moreover, propagating 2a HCVcc under the selective pressure of WT HC-1 or affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies yielded no viral escape mutants and, with the affinity-matured IgG1, needed 100-fold less antibody to achieve complete virus elimination. Taken together, these findings suggest that affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies are excellent candidates for therapeutic development.
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Extraction and inhibition of enzymatic activity of botulinum neurotoxins /B1, /B2, /B3, /B4, and /B5 by a panel of monoclonal anti-BoNT/B antibodies.
BMC Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2011
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Botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), extremely toxic proteins which can induce respiratory failure leading to long-term intensive care or death. Treatment for botulism includes administration of antitoxins, which must be administered early in the course of the intoxication; therefore, rapid determination of human exposure to BoNT is an important public health goal. In previous work, our laboratory reported on Endopep-MS, a mass spectrometry-based activity method for detecting and differentiating BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F in clinical samples. We also demonstrated that antibody-capture is effective for purification and concentration of BoNTs from complex matrices such as clinical samples. However, some antibodies inhibit or neutralize the enzymatic activity of BoNT, so the choice of antibody for toxin extraction is critical.
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Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel safety assessment of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), methyl methacrylate crosspolymer, and methyl methacrylate/glycol dimethacrylate crosspolymer.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and related cosmetic ingredients methyl methacrylate crosspolymer and methyl methacrylate/glycol dimethacrylate crosspolymer are polymers that function as film formers and viscosity-increasing agents in cosmetics. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determination of safety of PMMA use in several medical devices, which included human and animal safety data, was used as the basis of safety of PMMA and related polymers in cosmetics by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel.  The PMMA used in cosmetics is substantially the same as in medical devices.  The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentrations as described in this safety assessment.
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Amended safety assessment of Sesamum indicum (sesame) seed oil, hydrogenated sesame seed oil, Sesamum indicum (sesame) oil unsaponifiables, and sodium sesameseedate.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Sesamum indicum (sesame) seed oil and related cosmetic ingredients are derived from Sesamum indicum. Sesamum indicum (sesame) seed oil, sesamum indicum (sesame) oil unsaponifiables, and hydrogenated sesame seed oil function as conditioning agents. Sodium sesameseedate functions as a cleansing agent, emulsifying agent, and a nonaqueous viscosity increasing agent. These ingredients are neither skin irritants, sensitizers, teratogens, nor carcinogens at exposures that would result from cosmetic use. Both animal and human data relevant to the cosmetic use of these ingredients were reviewed. The CIR Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as described in this safety assessment.
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Final report of the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients derived from Zea mays (corn).
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Many cosmetic ingredients are derived from Zea mays (corn). While safety test data were not available for most ingredients, similarities in preparation and the resulting similar composition allowed extrapolation of safety data to all listed ingredients. Animal studies included acute toxicity, ocular and dermal irritation studies, and dermal sensitization studies. Clinical studies included dermal irritation and sensitization. Case reports were available for the starch as used as a donning agent in medical gloves. Studies of many other endpoints, including reproductive and developmental toxicity, use corn oil as a vehicle control with no reported adverse effects at levels used in cosmetics. While industry should continue limiting ingredient impurities such as pesticide residues before blending into a cosmetic formulation, the CIR Expert Panel determined that corn-derived ingredients are safe for use in cosmetics in the practices of use and concentration described in the assessment.
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Final report on the safety assessment of Cocos nucifera (coconut) oil and related ingredients.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2011
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Cocos nucifera (coconut) oil, oil from the dried coconut fruit, is composed of 90% saturated triglycerides. It may function as a fragrance ingredient, hair conditioning agent, or skin-conditioning agent and is reported in 626 cosmetics at concentrations from 0.0001% to 70%. The related ingredients covered in this assessment are fatty acids, and their hydrogenated forms, corresponding fatty alcohols, simple esters, and inorganic and sulfated salts of coconut oil. The salts and esters are expected to have similar toxicological profiles as the oil, its hydrogenated forms, and its constituent fatty acids. Coconut oil and related ingredients are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.
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When do we know enough to recommend action on the social determinants of health?
Am J Prev Med
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commission to Build a Healthier America was charged to identify strategies beyond medical care to address health disparities in the U.S. related to social and economic disadvantage. Based on insights gained while providing scientific support for the commissions efforts, this paper presents an overview of major issues that arise when assessing evidence to inform policies and programs to address the social determinants of health. While many of the insights are not new, they have not been widely assimilated within medicine and public health. They have particular relevance now, given growing awareness of the important health influences of social factors. The discussion presented here is intended to highlight key considerations for researchers who study social determinants of health and policymakers whose decisions are shaped by research findings. Policies should be based on the best available knowledge, derived from diverse sources and methods. An array of tools and guidelines is now available to guide the assessment of evidence on the social determinants of health, building on--and going beyond--principles first articulated in the "Evidence-Based Medicine" movement. The central thesis of the current paper is that the standards for evidence to guide social policies must be equally rigorous but also more comprehensive than those traditionally used to inform clinical interventions, because social policies must deal with upstream factors that affect health through complex causal pathways over potentially long time periods.
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Mouse and human lung fibroblasts regulate dendritic cell trafficking, airway inflammation, and fibrosis through integrin ?v?8-mediated activation of TGF-?.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2011
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The airway is a primary portal of entry for noxious environmental stimuli that can trigger airway remodeling, which contributes significantly to airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic asthma. Important pathologic components of airway remodeling include fibrosis and abnormal innate and adaptive immune responses. The positioning of fibroblasts in interstitial spaces suggests that they could participate in both fibrosis and chemokine regulation of the trafficking of immune cells such as dendritic cells, which are crucial antigen-presenting cells. However, physiological evidence for this dual role for fibroblasts is lacking. Here, in two physiologically relevant models - conditional deletion in mouse fibroblasts of the TGF-?-activating integrin ?v?8 and neutralization of ?v?8 in human COPD fibroblasts - we have elucidated a mechanism whereby lung fibroblast chemokine secretion directs dendritic cell trafficking, in a manner that is critically dependent on ?v?8-mediated activation of TGF-? by fibroblasts. Our data therefore indicate that fibroblasts have a crucial role in regulating both fibrotic and immune responses in the lung.
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Influence of affinity and antigen internalization on the uptake and penetration of Anti-HER2 antibodies in solid tumors.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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Antibody drugs are widely used in cancer therapy, but conditions to maximize tumor penetration and efficacy have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the impact of antibody binding affinity on tumor targeting and penetration with affinity variants that recognize the same epitope. Specifically, we compared four derivatives of the C6.5 monoclonal antibody (mAb), which recognizes the same HER2 epitope (monovalent K(D) values ranging from 270 to 0.56 nmol/L). Moderate affinity was associated with the highest tumor accumulation at 24 and 120 hours after intravenous injection, whereas high affinity was found to produce the lowest tumor accumulation. Highest affinity mAbs were confined to the perivascular space of tumors with an average penetration of 20.4 ± 7.5 ?m from tumor blood vessels. Conversely, lowest affinity mAbs exhibited a broader distribution pattern with an average penetration of 84.8 ± 12.8 ?m. In vitro internalization assays revealed that antibody internalization and catabolism generally increased with affinity, plateauing once the rate of HER2 internalization exceeded the rate of antibody dissociation. Effects of internalization and catabolism on tumor targeting were further examined using antibodies of moderate (C6.5) or high-affinity (trastuzumab), labeled with residualizing ((111)In-labeled) or nonresidualizing ((125)I-labeled) radioisotopes. Significant amounts of antibody of both affinities were degraded by tumors in vivo. Furthermore, moderate- to high-affinity mAbs targeting the same HER2 epitope with monovalent affinity above 23 nmol/L had equal tumor accumulation of residualizing radiolabel over 120 hours. Results indicated equal tumor exposure, suggesting that mAb penetration and retention in tumors reflected affinity-based differences in tumor catabolism. Together, these results suggest that high-density, rapidly internalizing antigens subject high-affinity antibodies to greater internalization and degradation, thereby limiting their penetration of tumors. In contrast, lower-affinity antibodies penetrate tumors more effectively when rates of antibody-antigen dissociation are higher than those of antigen internalization. Together, our findings offer insights into how to optimize the ability of therapeutic antibodies to penetrate tumors.
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Synergistic capture of clostridium botulinum type A neurotoxin by scFv antibodies to novel epitopes.
Biotechnol. Bioeng.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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A non-immune library of human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was screened for binding to the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain [BoNT/A (H(c) )] with the goal of identifying scFv to novel epitopes. To do this, an antibody-mediated labeling strategy was used in which antigen-binding yeast clones were selected after labeling with previously characterized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the H(c) . Twenty unique scFv clones were isolated that bound H(c) . Of these, 3 also bound to full-length BoNT/A toxin complex with affinities ranging from 5 to 48?nM. Epitope binning showed that the three unique clones recognized at least two epitopes distinct from one another as well as from the detection MAbs. After production in E. coli, scFv were coupled to magnetic particles and tested for their ability to capture BoNT/A holotoxin using an Endopep-MS assay. In this assay, toxin captured by scFv coated magnetic particles was detected by incubation of the complex with a peptide containing a BoNT/A-specific cleavage sequence. Mass spectrometry was used to detect the ratio of intact peptide to cleavage products as evidence for toxin capture. When tested individually, each of the scFv showed a weak positive Endopep-MS result. However, when the particles were coated with all three scFv simultaneously, they exhibited significantly higher Endopep-MS activity, consistent with synergistic binding. These results demonstrate novel approaches toward the isolation and characterization of scFv antibodies specific to unlabeled antigens. They also provide evidence that distinct scFv antibodies can work synergistically to increase the efficiency of antigen capture onto a solid support. Biotechnol. Bioeng. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Evaluation of the anti-HER2 C6.5 diabody as a PET radiotracer to monitor HER2 status and predict response to trastuzumab treatment.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-21-2010
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The rapid tumor targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of engineered antibodies make them potentially suitable for use in imaging strategies to predict and monitor response to targeted therapies. This study aims to evaluate C6.5 diabody (C6.5 db), a noncovalent anti-HER2 single-chain Fv dimer, as a radiotracer for predicting response to HER2-targeted therapies such as trastuzumab.
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Amended safety assessment of dodecylbenzenesulfonate, decylbenzenesulfonate, and tridecylbenzenesulfonate salts as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate is one of a group of salts of alkylbenzene sulfonates used in cosmetics as surfactant-cleansing agents. Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate is soluble in water and partially soluble in alcohol, with dermal absorption dependent on pH. Dodecylbenzenesulfonate salts are not toxic in single-dose oral and dermal animal tests, and no systemic toxicities were observed in repeat-dose dermal animal studies. In dermal animal studies, no evidence of reproductive or developmental toxicity was reported. At 15% concentrations, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate was severely irritating to rabbit skin. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel concluded that the irritant properties of these ingredients are similar to those of other detergents, with severity dependent on concentration and pH. Products containing these ingredients should be formulated to ensure that the irritancy potential is minimized.
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Final amended safety assessment of hydroquinone as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Hydroquinone is an aromatic compound that functions in cosmetics as an antioxidant, fragrance, reducing agent, or polymerization inhibitor. Hydroquinone is also used as a skin bleaching agent. Safety and toxicity information indicate that hydroquinone is dermally absorbed in humans from both aqueous and alcoholic formulations and is excreted mainly as the glucuronide or sulfate conjugates. Hydroquinone is associated with altered immune function in vitro and in vivo in animals and an increased incidence of renal tubule cell tumors and leukemia in F344 rats, but the relevance to humans is uncertain. Quantitatively, however, the use of hydroquinone in cosmetics is unlikely to result in renal neoplasia through this mode of action. Thus, hydroquinone is safe at concentrations of ?1% in hair dyes and is safe for use in nail adhesives. Hydroquinone should not be used in other leave-on cosmetics.
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Final report of the safety assessment of Kojic acid as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Kojic acid functions as an antioxidant in cosmetic products. Kojic acid was not a toxicant in acute, chronic, reproductive, and genotoxicity studies. While some animal data suggested tumor promotion and weak carcinogenicity, kojic acid is slowly absorbed into the circulation from human skin and likely would not reach the threshold at which these effects were seen. The available human sensitization data supported the safety of kojic acid at a use concentration of 2% in leave-on cosmetics. Kojic acid depigmented black guinea pig skin at a concentration of 4%, but this effect was not seen at 1%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the 2 end points of concern, dermal sensitization and skin lightening, would not be seen at use concentrations below 1%; therefore, this ingredient is safe for use in cosmetic products up to that level.
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Final report of the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel amended safety assessment of Calendula officinalis-derived cosmetic ingredients.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2010
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Calendula officinalis extract, C officinalis flower, C officinalis flower extract, C officinalis flower oil, and C officinalis seed oil are cosmetic ingredients derived from C officinalis. These ingredients may contain minerals, carbohydrates, lipids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, sterols and steroids, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, triterpenes, tocopherols, quinones, amino acids, and resins. These ingredients were not significantly toxic in single-dose oral studies using animals. The absence of reproductive/developmental toxicity was inferred from repeat-dose studies of coriander oil, with a similar composition. Overall, these ingredients were not genotoxic. They also were not irritating, sensitizing, or photosensitizing in animal or clinical tests but may be mild ocular irritants. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe for use in cosmetics in the practices of use and concentration given in this amended safety assessment.
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The Protective Effect of Family Strengths in Childhood against Adolescent Pregnancy and Its Long-Term Psychosocial Consequences.
Perm J
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2010
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Background: Few reports have addressed associations between family strengths during childhood and adolescent pregnancy and its consequences. We examined relationships among a number of childhood family strengths and adolescent pregnancy, risk behavior, and psychosocial consequences after adolescent pregnancy.Methods: Our retrospective cohort of 4648 women older than 18 years (mean age, 56 years) received primary care in San Diego, CA. Outcomes included adolescent pregnancy and psychosocial consequences compared with number of the following childhood family strengths: family closeness, support, loyalty, protection, love, importance, and responsiveness to health needs.Results: Of the cohort, 3082 participants (66%) reported 6 or 7 categories of childhood family strengths. Teen pregnancy occurred in 39%, 33%, 30%, 25%, 24%, 21%, and 19% of those with 0 or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 childhood family strengths, respectively (p for trend < 0.00001). When childhood abuse and household dysfunction were present, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for adolescent pregnancy demonstrated an increasingly protective effect as numbers of childhood family strengths increased from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3, 4 or 5, and 6 or 7 (1.0 to 0.80), (1.0 to 0.80, 0.60, and 0.54, respectively). These findings were partly explained by progressive delays in initiation of sexual activity as the number of childhood family strengths increased. Adjusted ORs for psychosocial problem occurring decades later decreased as the number of childhood family strengths increased from 0 or 1 to 2 or 3, 4 or 5, and 6 or 7 (job problems, 1.0, 0.8, 0.6, 0.4; family problems, 1.0, 1.1, 0.7, 0.6; financial problems, 1.0, 0.9, 0.9, 0.6; high stress, 1.0, 1.1, 0.9, 0.8; uncontrollable anger, 1.0, 0.7, 0.7, 0.4).Conclusions: Childhood family strengths are strongly protective against adolescent pregnancy, early initiation of sexual activity, and long-term psychosocial consequences.
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Final report of the safety assessment of methylisothiazolinone.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2010
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Methylisothiazolinone (MIT) is a heterocyclic organic compound used as a preservative in cosmetics and personal care products in concentrations up to 0.01%. MIT is a colorless, clear liquid with a mild odor that is completely soluble in water; mostly soluble in acetonitrile, methanol, and hexane; and slightly soluble in xylene. Consistent with its solubility, dermal penetration is low. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel noted the in vitro evidence of neurotoxicity but concluded that the absence of any neurotoxicity findings in the many in vivo studies, including subchronic, chronic, and reproductive and developmental animal studies, suggests that MIT would not be neurotoxic as used in cosmetics. Although recognizing that MIT was a sensitizer in both animal and human studies, the panel concluded that there is a threshold dose response and that cosmetic products formulated to contain concentrations of MIT at 100 ppm (0.01%) or less would not be expected to pose a sensitization risk. Accordingly, MIT may be safely used as a preservative in cosmetics up to that concentration.
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Final report of the amended safety assessment of myristic acid and its salts and esters as used in cosmetics.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2010
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This report addresses the safety of the inorganic salts and esters of various fatty alcohols of myristic acid. Most of the esters are used as skin conditioning agents in many types of cosmetics in a range of concentrations. Myristate esters are readily hydrolyzed to the corresponding alcohols and acids, which are then further metabolized. Myristate salts readily dissociate in any likely cosmetic formulation. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Panel recognized that much of the data supporting the ingredients in this group were previously reviewed in safety assessments for related ingredients. Where specific data did not exist, the Panel considered structure-activity relationships in determining the safety of these ingredients as used in cosmetics. The Panel determined that myristic acid and its salts and esters are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the current practices of use and concentration.
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Final report of the amended safety assessment of sodium laureth sulfate and related salts of sulfated ethoxylated alcohols.
Int. J. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2010
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Sodium laureth sulfate is a member of a group of salts of sulfated ethoxylated alcohols, the safety of which was evaluated by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel for use in cosmetics. Sodium and ammonium laureth sulfate have not evoked adverse responses in any toxicological testing. Sodium laureth sulfate was demonstrated to be a dermal and ocular irritant but not a sensitizer. The Expert Panel recognized that there are data gaps regarding use and concentration of these ingredients. However, the overall information available on the types of products in which these ingredients are used and at what concentrations indicates a pattern of use. The potential to produce irritation exists with these salts of sulfated ethoxylated alcohols, but in practice they are not regularly seen to be irritating because of the formulations in which they are used. These ingredients should be used only when they can be formulated to be nonirritating.
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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.