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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The IRF5-TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2014
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Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5-TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5-TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10(-49); OR = 1.38-1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10(-27)-10(-32), OR = 1.7-1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5-TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5-TNPO3.
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Variants at multiple loci implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses are associated with Sjögrens syndrome.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2013
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Sjögrens syndrome is a common autoimmune disease (affecting ?0.7% of European Americans) that typically presents as keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Here we report results of a large-scale association study of Sjögrens syndrome. In addition to strong association within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region at 6p21 (Pmeta = 7.65 × 10(-114)), we establish associations with IRF5-TNPO3 (Pmeta = 2.73 × 10(-19)), STAT4 (Pmeta = 6.80 × 10(-15)), IL12A (Pmeta = 1.17 × 10(-10)), FAM167A-BLK (Pmeta = 4.97 × 10(-10)), DDX6-CXCR5 (Pmeta = 1.10 × 10(-8)) and TNIP1 (Pmeta = 3.30 × 10(-8)). We also observed suggestive associations (Pmeta < 5 × 10(-5)) with variants in 29 other regions, including TNFAIP3, PTTG1, PRDM1, DGKQ, FCGR2A, IRAK1BP1, ITSN2 and PHIP, among others. These results highlight the importance of genes that are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity in Sjögrens syndrome.
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Kruppel-like factor 5 is required for formation and differentiation of the bladder urothelium.
Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
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Kruppel-like transcription factor 5 (Klf5) was detected in the developing and mature murine bladder urothelium. Herein we report a critical role of KLF5 in the formation and terminal differentiation of the urothelium. The Shh(GfpCre) transgene was used to delete the Klf5(floxed) alleles from bladder epithelial cells causing prenatal hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and vesicoureteric reflux. The bladder urothelium failed to stratify and did not express terminal differentiation markers characteristic of basal, intermediate, and umbrella cells including keratins 20, 14, and 5, and the uroplakins. The effects of Klf5 deletion were unique to the developing bladder epithelium since maturation of the epithelium comprising the bladder neck and urethra was unaffected by the lack of KLF5. mRNA analysis identified reductions in Ppar?, Grhl3, Elf3, and Ovol1expression in Klf5 deficient fetal bladders supporting their participation in a transcriptional network regulating bladder urothelial differentiation. KLF5 regulated expression of the mGrhl3 promoter in transient transfection assays. The absence of urothelial Klf5 altered epithelial-mesenchymal signaling leading to the formation of an ectopic alpha smooth muscle actin positive layer of cells subjacent to the epithelium and a thinner detrusor muscle that was not attributable to disruption of SHH signaling, a known mediator of detrusor morphogenesis. Deletion of Klf5 from the developing bladder urothelium blocked epithelial cell differentiation, impaired bladder morphogenesis and function causing hydroureter and hydronephrosis at birth.
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Comparative gene expression analysis of genital tubercle development reveals a putative appendicular Wnt7 network for the epidermal differentiation.
Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2010
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Here we describe the first detailed catalog of gene expression in the developing lower urinary tract (LUT), including epithelial and mesenchymal portions of the developing bladder, urogenital sinus, urethra, and genital tubercle (GT) at E13 and E14. Top compartment-specific genes implicated by the microarray data were validated using whole-mount in situ hybridization (ISH) over the entire LUT. To demonstrate the potential of this resource to implicate developmentally critical features, we focused on gene expression patterns and pathways in the sexually indeterminate, androgen-independent GT. GT expression patterns reinforced the proposed similarities between development of GT, limb, and craniofacial prominences. Comparison of spatial expression patterns predicted a network of Wnt7a-associated GT-enriched epithelial genes, including Gjb2, Dsc3, Krt5, and Sostdc1. Known from other contexts, these genes are associated with normal epidermal differentiation, with disruptions in Dsc3 and Gjb2 showing palmo-plantar keratoderma in the limb. We propose that this gene network contributes to normal foreskin, scrotum, and labial development. As several of these genes are known to be regulated by, or contain cis elements responsive to retinoic acid, estrogen, or androgen, this implicates this pathway in the later androgen-dependent development of the GT.
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SUMOylation of nuclear actin.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Actin, a major component of the cytoplasm, is also abundant in the nucleus. Nuclear actin is involved in a variety of nuclear processes including transcription, chromatin remodeling, and intranuclear transport. Nevertheless, the regulation of nuclear actin by posttranslational modifications has not been investigated. We now show that nuclear actin is modified by SUMO2 and SUMO3 and that computational modeling and site-directed mutagenesis identified K68 and K284 as critical sites for SUMOylating actin. We also present a model for the actin-SUMO complex and show that SUMOylation is required for the nuclear localization of actin.
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Rescue of skeletal muscle alpha-actin-null mice by cardiac (fetal) alpha-actin.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2009
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Skeletal muscle alpha-actin (ACTA1) is the major actin in postnatal skeletal muscle. Mutations of ACTA1 cause mostly fatal congenital myopathies. Cardiac alpha-actin (ACTC) is the major striated actin in adult heart and fetal skeletal muscle. It is unknown why ACTC and ACTA1 expression switch during development. We investigated whether ACTC can replace ACTA1 in postnatal skeletal muscle. Two ACTC transgenic mouse lines were crossed with Acta1 knockout mice (which all die by 9 d after birth). Offspring resulting from the cross with the high expressing line survive to old age, and their skeletal muscles show no gross pathological features. The mice are not impaired on grip strength, rotarod, or locomotor activity. These findings indicate that ACTC is sufficiently similar to ACTA1 to produce adequate function in postnatal skeletal muscle. This raises the prospect that ACTC reactivation might provide a therapy for ACTA1 diseases. In addition, the mouse model will allow analysis of the precise functional differences between ACTA1 and ACTC.
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Forkhead box M1 transcriptional factor is required for smooth muscle cells during embryonic development of blood vessels and esophagus.
Dev. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2009
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The forkhead box m1 (Foxm1 or Foxm1b) transcription factor (previously called HFH-11B, Trident, Win, or MPP2) is expressed in a variety of tissues during embryogenesis, including vascular, airway, and intestinal smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Although global deletion of Foxm1 in Foxm1(-/-) mice is lethal in the embryonic period due to multiple abnormalities in the liver, heart, and lung, the specific role of Foxm1 in SMC remains unknown. In the present study, Foxm1 was deleted conditionally in the developing SMC (smFoxm1(-/-) mice). The majority of smFoxm1(-/-) mice died immediately after birth due to severe pulmonary hemorrhage and structural defects in arterial wall and esophagus. Although Foxm1 deletion did not influence SMC differentiation, decreased proliferation of SMC was found in smFoxm1(-/-) blood vessels and esophagus. Depletion of Foxm1 in cultured SMC caused G(2) arrest and decreased numbers of cells undergoing mitosis. Foxm1-deficiency in vitro and in vivo was associated with reduced expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, including cyclin B1, Cdk1-activator Cdc25b phosphatase, Polo-like 1 and JNK1 kinases, and cMyc transcription factor. Foxm1 is critical for proliferation of smooth muscle cells and is required for proper embryonic development of blood vessels and esophagus.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.