JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for diffuse large B cell lymphoma transformed from follicular lymphoma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There are limited data on the outcomes of autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma transformed from follicular lymphoma. We analyzed transplantation outcomes in 141 subjects with biopsy-proven diffuse large B-cell lymphoma transformed from follicular lymphoma reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1990 and 2009. Two groups were identified: autologous HCT (auto-HCT; n = 108) and allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT; n = 33). Fewer auto-HCTs were done for transformed follicular lymphoma in 2003 to 2009, with a shift favoring allo-HCT. Auto-HCT was associated with a 1-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM) of 8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4% to 14%), 5-year progression-free survival of 35% (95% CI, 26% to 45%), and 5-year overall survival of 50% (95% CI, 40% to 59%). In contrast, allo-HCT was associated with a 1-year NRM of 41% (95% CI, 23% to 58%), 5-year progression-free survival of 18% (95% CI, 6% to 35%), and 5-year overall survival of 22% (95% CI, 8% to 41%). Auto-HCT for transformed follicular lymphoma achieves sustained remission in a high proportion of subjects. The high NRM of allo-HCT offset any benefit that might be associated with this transplantation modality.
Related JoVE Video
Challenges and potential solutions for recruitment and retention of hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians: the National Marrow Donor Program's System Capacity Initiative Physician Workforce Group report.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) remains the only known curative therapy for many patients with hematologic, metabolic, and immunologic disorders. Furthermore, the use of HCT has increased with the emergence of HCT as a viable therapeutic option for older patients, those with significant comorbidities, and, with the demonstrated clinical effectiveness of alternative allogeneic donor sources, for those patients without a suitable sibling donor. The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) estimates that by 2020, it will facilitate 10,000 transplantations per year, double the number in 2010. To understand the needs of the HCT infrastructure to facilitate this number of transplantations, the NMDP organized the System Capacity Initiative 2020, centered on 6 working groups representing a diverse group of stakeholders. The Physician Workforce Group was tasked with addressing issues relating to recruitment and retention of transplantation physicians. We report here the results of our efforts and future initiatives.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of a permissible HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In subjects mismatched in the HLA alleles C*03:03/C*03:04 no allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are detected in vitro. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with unrelated donors (UDs) showed no association between the HLA-C allele mismatches (CAMMs) and adverse outcomes; antigen mismatches at this and mismatches other HLA loci are deleterious. The absence of effect of the CAMM may have resulted from the predominance of the mismatch C*03:03/C*03:04. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving UD HSCT matched in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA alleles were examined. Transplants mismatched in HLA-C antigens or mismatched in HLA-A, -B, or -DRB1 presented significant differences (P < .0001) in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, 1.30), disease-free survival (HR = 1.33, 1.27), treatment-related mortality (HR = 1.54, 1.54), and grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 1.49, 1.77) compared with the 8/8 group; transplants mismatched in other CAMMs had similar outcomes with HR ranging from 1.34 to 172 for these endpoints. The C*03:03/C*03:04 mismatched and the 8/8 matched groups had identical outcomes (HR ranging from 0.96-1.05). The previous finding that CAMMs do not associate with adverse outcomes is explained by the predominance (69%) of the mismatch C*03:03/03:04 in this group that is better tolerated than other HLA mismatches.
Related JoVE Video
Avascular necrosis of bone after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in children and adolescents.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We conducted a nested case-control study within a cohort of 6244 patients to assess risk factors for avascular necrosis (AVN) of bone in children and adolescents after allogeneic transplantation. Eligible patients were ?21 years of age, received their first allogeneic transplant between 1990 and 2008 in the United States, and had survived ? 6 months from transplantation. Overall, 160 patients with AVN and 478 control subjects matched by year of transplant, length of follow-up and transplant center were identified. Patients and control subjects were confirmed via central review of radiology, pathology, and/or surgical procedure reports. Median time from transplant to diagnosis of AVN was 14 months. On conditional logistic regression, increasing age at transplant (?5 years), female gender, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were significantly associated with increased risks of AVN. Compared with patients receiving myeloablative regimens for malignant diseases, lower risks of AVN were seen in patients with nonmalignant diseases and those who had received reduced-intensity conditioning regimens for malignant diseases. Children at high risk for AVN include those within the age group where rapid bone growth occurs as well as those who experience exposure to myeloablative conditioning regimens and immunosuppression after hematopoietic cell transplantation for the treatment of GVHD. More research is needed to determine whether screening strategies specifically for patients at high risk for developing AVN with early interventions may mitigate the morbidity associated with this complication.
Related JoVE Video
Prevalence of hematopoietic cell transplant survivors in the United States.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have led to an increasing number of transplant survivors. To adequately support their healthcare needs, there is a need to know the prevalence of HCT survivors. We used data on 170,628 recipients of autologous and allogeneic HCT reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1968 to 2009 to estimate the current and future number of HCT survivors in the United States. Stacked cohort simulation models were used to estimate the number of HCT survivors in the United States in 2009 and to make projections for HCT survivors by the year 2030. There were 108,900 (range, 100,500 to 115,200) HCT survivors in the United States in 2009. This included 67,000 autologous HCT and 41,900 allogeneic HCT survivors. The number of HCT survivors is estimated to increase by 2.5 times by the year 2020 (242,000 survivors) and 5 times by the year 2030 (502,000 survivors). By 2030, the age at transplant will be < 18 years for 14% of all survivors (n = 64,000), 18 to 59 years for 61% survivors (n = 276,000), and 60 years and older for 25% of survivors (n = 113,000). In coming decades, a large number of individuals will be HCT survivors. Transplant center providers, hematologists, oncologists, primary care physicians, and other specialty providers will need to be familiar with the unique and complex health issues faced by this population.
Related JoVE Video
Significant improvement in survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation during a period of significantly increased use, older recipient age, and use of unrelated donors.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Over the past four decades, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) has evolved as a curative modality for patients with hematologic diseases. This study describes changes in use, technique, and survival in a population-based cohort.
Related JoVE Video
Trends in use of and survival after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation in North America, 1995-2005: significant improvement in survival for lymphoma and myeloma during a period of increasing recipient age.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) is performed to treat relapsed and recurrent malignant disorders and as part of initial therapy for selected malignancies. This study evaluated changes in use, techniques, and survival in a population-based cohort of 68,404 patients who underwent first auto-HCT in a US or Canadian center between 1994 and 2005 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). The mean annual number of auto-HCTs performed was highest during 1996-1999 (6948), and decreased subsequently 2000-2003 (4783), owing mainly to fewer auto-HCTs done to treat breast cancer. However, the mean annual number of auto-HCTs increased from 5278 annually in 1994-1995 to 5459 annually in 2004-2005, reflecting increased use for multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite an increase in the median recipient age from 44 to 53 years, there has been a significant improvement in overall survival (OS) from 1994 to 2005 in patients with chemotherapy-sensitive relapsed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (day +100 OS, from 85% to 96%; 1-year OS, from 68% to 80%; P < .001) and chemotherapy-sensitive multiple myeloma (day +100 OS, from 96% to 98%; 1-year OS, from 83% to 92%; P < .001). This improvement in OS was most pronounced in middle-aged (>40 years) and older (>60 years) individuals.
Related JoVE Video
Standardization of terminology for episodes of hematopoietic stem cell patient transplant care.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The nomenclature describing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has evolved, adding precision and definition in research and regulation. The lack of coordination and standardization in terminology has left some gaps in the definition of episodes of clinical care. These voids have caused particular problems in contracting for payment and billing for services rendered. The purpose of this report is to propose definitions for cell products, cell infusions, and transplantation episodes.
Related JoVE Video
Allogeneic transplant physician and center capacity in the United States.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Shortage of manpower and center capacity is expected to be a major challenge to the anticipated future growth in the utilization of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the United States. Using data from the National Marrow Donor Programs Transplant Center Network Renewal Survey, we describe transplant center and transplant physician capacity in the United States from 2005 to 2009. Over this 5-year period, the number of allogeneic transplants increased by 30%, bed capacity increased by 17%, and physician full-time equivalents increased by 26%. The number of related donor HCT increased by 15% and unrelated donor HCT increased by 45%. In addition to large centers, small- and medium-sized centers also made a major contribution to overall national transplant volumes for both related and unrelated donor HCT. Increase in utilization of unrelated donor HCT occurred in centers irrespective of their size. The majority of transplant centers were performing more transplantations using existing physician and bed capacity. Our study provides important descriptions of allogeneic transplant activity and capacity of U.S. centers, and our data will assist policy makers plan for the projected growth in the use of transplantation.
Related JoVE Video
Outcome of patients with IgD and IgM multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective CIBMTR study.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Immunoglobulin D (IgD) and IgM multiple myeloma represent uncommon immunoglobulin isotypes, accounting for 2% and 0.5% of cases, respectively. Limited information is available regarding the prognosis of these isotypes, but they have been considered to have a more aggressive course than the more common immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA isotypes. In particular, the outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) has not been well defined.
Related JoVE Video
Outcomes of pediatric bone marrow transplantation for leukemia and myelodysplasia using matched sibling, mismatched related, or matched unrelated donors.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although some trials have allowed matched or single human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donors (mmRDs) along with HLA-matched sibling donors (MSDs) for pediatric bone marrow transplantation in early-stage hematologic malignancies, whether mmRD grafts lead to similar outcomes is not known. We compared patients < 18 years old reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic T-replete, myeloablative bone marrow transplantation between 1993 and 2006. In total, patients receiving bone marrow from 1208 MSDs, 266 8/8 allelic-matched unrelated donors (URDs), and 151 0-1 HLA-antigen mmRDs were studied. Multivariate analysis showed that recipients of MSD transplants had less transplantation-related mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and chronic GVHD, along with better disease-free and overall survival than the URD and mmRD groups. No differences were observed in transplant-related mortality, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival between the mmRD and URD groups. These data show that mmRD and 8/8 URD outcomes are similar, whereas MSD outcomes are superior to the other 2 sources. Whether allele level typing could identify mmRD recipients with better outcomes will not be known unless centers alter practice and type mmRD at the allele level.
Related JoVE Video
HLA-C antigen mismatch is associated with worse outcome in unrelated donor peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The association between HLA matching and outcome in unrelated-donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation has not yet been established. In the present study, a total of 1933 unrelated donor-recipient pairs who underwent PBSC transplantation between 1999 and 2006 for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelogenous leukemia and received high-resolution HLA typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 were included in the analysis. Outcomes were compared between HLA-matched and HLA-mismatched pairs, adjusting for patient and transplant characteristics. Matching for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 alleles (8/8 match) was associated with better survival at 1 year compared with 7/8 HLA-matched pairs (56% vs 47%). Using 8/8 HLA-matched patients as the baseline (n = 1243), HLA-C antigen mismatches (n = 189) were statistically significantly associated with lower leukemia-free survival (relative risk [RR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.64; P = .0010), and increased risk for mortality (RR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16-1.70; P = .0005), treatment-related mortality (RR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.25-2.08; P = .0002), and grade III-IV graft-versus-host disease (RR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.50-2.62; P < .0001). HLA-B antigen or allele mismatching was associated with an increased risk for acute GVHD grade III-IV. No statistically significant differences in outcome were observed for HLA-C allele (n = 61), HLA-A antigen/allele (n = 136), HLA-DRB1 allele (n = 39), or HLA-DQ antigen/allele (n = 114) mismatches compared with 8/8 HLA-matched pairs. HLA mismatch was not associated with relapse or chronic GVHD. HLA-C antigen-mismatched unrelated PBSC donors were associated with worse outcomes compared with 8/8 HLA-matched donors. The studys limited power due to small sample size precludes conclusions about other mismatches.
Related JoVE Video
One-antigen mismatched related versus HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia: Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research results in the era of molecular HLA typing.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Approximately 13% of patients lacking an HLA-identical sibling have a one-antigen-mismatched related donor (MMRD). Historically, outcomes from the use of a one-antigen MMRD were considered equivalent to those from the use of a matched unrelated donor (UD). Recent improvements in UD stem cell transplantation (SCT) resulting from better molecular HLA matching justifies investigating whether UD should be preferred over MMRD in adult patients with acute leukemia. Here, we compared the outcomes of MMRD (n = 89) and HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 allele-matched UD (n = 700) SCT reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1995 and 2005. The patients underwent transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first or second complete remission. Donor type was not associated with hematologic recovery. Univariate and multivariate comparisons of MMRD versus HLA-matched UD transplants showed no statistically significant differences in overall survival, disease-free survival, treatment-related mortality, relapse, or 100-day grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). MMRD SCT was associated with a lower rate of chronic GVHD at 1 year (35% vs 47%; P = .03), which was confirmed by multivariate analysis (relative risk, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.85; P < .01). According to our data, HLA-matched UD and MMRD SCT are associated with comparable survival. Given that less chronic GVHD was observed in the MMRD transplantations, this option, when available, remains the first choice in patients with acute leukemia without an HLA-identical sibling in need of allogeneic SCT.
Related JoVE Video
Impending challenges in the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation physician workforce.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
With increasing use of high dose chemotherapy with autologous and allogeneic transplants the need for the transplant physician workforce requires reassessment. The types of transplants and patients are also shifting toward transplants being done in patients with more comorbidities and more commonly these types of patients require more work effort per patient from the transplant physician. Additionally, HSCT survivors often require ongoing care at the transplant center due to the inability of the primary care workforce or the hematology/oncology workforce to absorb caring for post complex post transplant patients. The adult transplant workforce has had very few physicians join under age 40. Nearly 50% of adult transplant physicians are over age 50 whereas only 28% of pediatric transplant physicians are over age 50. By 2020, it is projected that we will need 1,264 new adult transplant physicians and 94 pediatric transplant physicians. Training time for a physician is approximately 15 years. The capping of both medical school slots and residency slots since the early 80s is now having a very big impact on supply, but other factors are also affecting supplies such as generational differences, lifestyle expectations, and the change of the medical workforce from being mostly men. Workforce shortages are being reported for many specialities. Workforce problems are also present for nurses, pharmacists and medical technologists. So increasing use of general internists and mid-level providers may not exist as a solution. Transplant physicians must be actively engaged in the medical education process to show young medical students and residents who are not committed to another sub specialty career the excitement and challenges of a career in bone marrow transplantation, so that our field will have providers for the future.
Related JoVE Video
The National Marrow Donor Programs symposium on patient advocacy in cellular transplantation therapy: addressing barriers to hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an effective treatment option for patients with life-threatening blood, immune system, or genetic disorders, many barriers besides a lack of suitably matched donors exist and can have an adverse impact on access and outcomes of HCT. In 2008, the National Marrow Donor Program, through its Office of Patient Advocacy, convened a diverse group of experts and transplantation survivors to identify persistent patient barriers throughout the transplantation process and to make recommendations for programs and initiatives to address these barriers, including new research opportunities. This group included transplantation physicians and other health care providers, relevant subject experts, and representatives from transplantation centers and patient advocacy organizations. Working groups were formed to identify patient barriers to HCT and to recommend and prioritize initiatives as they relate to the pretransplantation period, the early posttransplantation period, long-term survivorship, financial issues, and special populations. This report summarizes the symposiums deliberations and recommendations to address persistent patient barriers throughout the transplantation process.
Related JoVE Video
Autologous and allogeneic transplantation for burkitt lymphoma outcomes and changes in utilization: a report from the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Trends in utilization and outcomes after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Burkitt lymphoma were analyzed in 241 recipients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1985 and 2007. The autologous HCT cohort had a higher proportion of chemotherapy-sensitive disease, peripheral blood grafts, and HCT in first complete remission (CR1). The use of autologous HCT has declined over time, with only 19% done after 2001. Overall survival at 5 years for the autologous cohort was 83% for those in CR1 and 31% for those not in CR1. Corresponding progression-free survival (PFS) was 78% and 27%, respectively. After allogeneic HCT, overall survival at 5 years was 53% and 20% for the CR1 and non-CR1 cohorts, whereas PFS was 50% and 19%, respectively. The most common cause of death was progressive lymphoma. Allogeneic HCT performed in a higher-risk subset (per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines) resulted in a 5-year PFS of 27%. Autologous HCT resulted in a 5-year PFS of 44% in those undergoing transplantation in the second CR.
Related JoVE Video
Autologous blood cell transplantation versus HLA-identical sibling transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a registry study from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research.
Haematologica
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The optimal post-remission treatment for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission remains uncertain. Previous comparisons of autologous versus allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation noted higher relapse, but lower treatment-related mortality though using bone marrow grafts, with treatment-related mortality of 12-20%. Recognizing lower treatment-related mortality using autologous peripheral blood grafts, in an analysis of registry data from the Center for International Blood and Transplant Research, we compared treatment-related mortality, relapse, leukemia-free survival, and overall survival for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (median ages 36-44, range 19-60) receiving myeloablative HLA-matched sibling donor grafts (bone marrow, n=475 or peripheral blood, n=428) versus autologous peripheral blood (n=230). The 5-year cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality was 19% (95% confidence interval, 16-23%), 20% (17-24%) and 8% (5-12%) for allogeneic bone marrow, allogeneic peripheral blood and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients, respectively. The corresponding figures for 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse were 20% (17-24%), 26% (21-30%) and 45% (38-52%), respectively. At 5 years, leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were similar: allogeneic bone marrow 61% (56-65%) and 64% (59-68%); allogeneic peripheral blood 54% (49-59%) and 59% (54-64%); autologous peripheral blood 47% (40-54%) and 54% (47-60%); P=0.13 and P=0.19, respectively. In multivariate analysis the incidence of treatment-related mortality was lower after autologous peripheral blood transplantation than after allogeneic bone marrow/peripheral blood transplants [relative risk 0.37 (0.20-0.69); P=0.001], but treatment failure (death or relapse) after autologous peripheral blood was significantly more likely [relative risk 1.32 (1.06-1.64); P=0.011]. The 5-year overall survival, however, was similar in patients who received autologous peripheral blood (n=230) [relative risk 1.23 (0.98-1.55); P=0.071] or allogeneic bone marrow/peripheral blood (n=903). In the absence of an HLA-matched sibling donor, autologous peripheral blood may provide acceptable alternative post-remission therapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.