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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Human immunodeficiency virus Tat associates with a specific set of cellular RNAs.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) exhibits a wide range of interactions with the host cell but whether viral proteins interact with cellular RNA is not clear. A candidate interacting factor is the trans-activator of transcription (Tat) protein. Tat is required for expression of virus genes but activates transcription through an unusual mechanism; binding to an RNA stem-loop, the transactivation response element (TAR), with the host elongation factor P-TEFb. HIV-1 Tat has also been shown to alter the expression of host genes during infection, contributing to viral pathogenesis but, whether Tat also interacts with cellular RNAs is unknown.
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HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-?B and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.
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HIV-1 capsid-cyclophilin interactions determine nuclear import pathway, integration targeting and replication efficiency.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2011
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Lentiviruses such as HIV-1 traverse nuclear pore complexes (NPC) and infect terminally differentiated non-dividing cells, but how they do this is unclear. The cytoplasmic NPC protein Nup358/RanBP2 was identified as an HIV-1 co-factor in previous studies. Here we report that HIV-1 capsid (CA) binds directly to the cyclophilin domain of Nup358/RanBP2. Fusion of the Nup358/RanBP2 cyclophilin (Cyp) domain to the tripartite motif of TRIM5 created a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 replication, consistent with an interaction in vivo. In contrast to CypA binding to HIV-1 CA, Nup358 binding is insensitive to inhibition with cyclosporine, allowing contributions from CypA and Nup358 to be distinguished. Inhibition of CypA reduced dependence on Nup358 and the nuclear basket protein Nup153, suggesting that CypA regulates the choice of the nuclear import machinery that is engaged by the virus. HIV-1 cyclophilin-binding mutants CA G89V and P90A favored integration in genomic regions with a higher density of transcription units and associated features than wild type virus. Integration preference of wild type virus in the presence of cyclosporine was similarly altered to regions of higher transcription density. In contrast, HIV-1 CA alterations in another patch on the capsid surface that render the virus less sensitive to Nup358 or TRN-SR2 depletion (CA N74D, N57A) resulted in integration in genomic regions sparse in transcription units. Both groups of CA mutants are impaired in replication in HeLa cells and human monocyte derived macrophages. Our findings link HIV-1 engagement of cyclophilins with both integration targeting and replication efficiency and provide insight into the conservation of viral cyclophilin recruitment.
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Error, reproducibility and sensitivity: a pipeline for data processing of Agilent oligonucleotide expression arrays.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2010
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Expression microarrays are increasingly used to obtain large scale transcriptomic information on a wide range of biological samples. Nevertheless, there is still much debate on the best ways to process data, to design experiments and analyse the output. Furthermore, many of the more sophisticated mathematical approaches to data analysis in the literature remain inaccessible to much of the biological research community. In this study we examine ways of extracting and analysing a large data set obtained using the Agilent long oligonucleotide transcriptomics platform, applied to a set of human macrophage and dendritic cell samples.
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Conformational adaptation of Asian macaque TRIMCyp directs lineage specific antiviral activity.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2010
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TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5alpha but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations.
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Short RNAs are transcribed from repressed polycomb target genes and interact with polycomb repressive complex-2.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Polycomb proteins maintain cell identity by repressing the expression of developmental regulators specific for other cell types. Polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) catalyzes trimethylation of histone H3 lysine-27 (H3K27me3). Although repressed, PRC2 targets are generally associated with the transcriptional initiation marker H3K4me3, but the significance of this remains unclear. Here, we identify a class of short RNAs, approximately 50-200 nucleotides in length, transcribed from the 5 end of polycomb target genes in primary T cells and embryonic stem cells. Short RNA transcription is associated with RNA polymerase II and H3K4me3, occurs in the absence of mRNA transcription, and is independent of polycomb activity. Short RNAs form stem-loop structures resembling PRC2 binding sites in Xist, interact with PRC2 through SUZ12, cause gene repression in cis, and are depleted from polycomb target genes activated during cell differentiation. We propose that short RNAs play a role in the association of PRC2 with its target genes.
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Microarray-based determination of the lytic cascade of human herpesvirus 6B.
J. Gen. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2009
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The lytic gene expression of several members of the human herpesvirus family has been profiled by using gene-expression microarrays; however, the lytic cascade of roseoloviruses has not been studied in similar depth. Based on the complete DNA genome sequences of human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and variant B (HHV-6B), we constructed a cDNA microarray containing DNA probes to their predicted open reading frames, plus 914 human genes. Gene-expression profiling of HHV-6B strain Z29 in SupT1 cells over a 60 h time-course post-infection, together with kinetic classification of the HHV-6B genes in the presence of either cycloheximide or phosphonoacetic acid, allowed the placement of HHV-6B genes into defined kinetic classes. Eighty-nine HHV-6B genes were divided into four different expression kinetic classes: eight immediate-early, 44 early, 33 late and four biphasic. Clustering of genes with similar expression profiles implied a shared function, thus revealing possible roles of previously uncharacterized HHV-6B genes.
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Transcriptional and functional defects of dendritic cells derived from the MUTZ-3 leukaemia line.
Immunology
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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Dendritic cells (DC) generated from MUTZ-3, an immortalized acute myeloid leukaemia-derived cell line, have potential application as a model for the study of human DC, and as a tool with which to stimulate immunotherapeutic responses to cancer. However, the relationship of MUTZ-3 DC to their non-transformed counterparts remains incompletely understood. Immunoselected CD14+ MUTZ-3 cells were used to generate a homogeneous population of DC (M3DC). These cells had a cell surface phentoype and morphology characteristic of conventional monocyte-derived DC (MDDC). Whole genome transcriptome comparison of M3DC and MDDC however, revealed extensive differences between these two cell types. Functional ontology-based data analysis revealed three enriched clusters of genes downregulated in M3DC, with functions in pathogen recognition, DC maturation and cytokine/chemokine signalling. Downregulation of protein expression was confirmed for several of these genes. The molecular differences were accompanied by a profoundly impaired phenotypic and functional response of M3DC to microbial stimulation. The immortalized phenotype of MUTZ-3 therefore reflects not only deregulated proliferative capacity, but substantial perturbation of normal antigen-presenting cell function. These results have important implications for studies using MUTZ-3 as a model of MDDC or for cancer immunotherapy.
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HIV-1 exploits importin 7 to maximize nuclear import of its DNA genome.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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Nuclear import of the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex (RTC) is critical for infection of non dividing cells, and importin 7 (imp7) has been implicated in this process. To further characterize the function of imp7 in HIV-1 replication we generated cell lines stably depleted for imp7 and used them in conjunction with infection, cellular fractionation and pull-down assays.
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Different patterns of Epstein-Barr virus latency in endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lead to distinct variants within the BL-associated gene expression signature.
J. Virol.
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Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in all cases of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) but in few European/North American sporadic BLs. Gene expression arrays of sporadic tumors have defined a consensus BL profile within which tumors are classifiable as "molecular BL" (mBL). Where endemic BLs fall relative to this profile remains unclear, since they not only carry EBV but also display one of two different forms of virus latency. Here, we use early-passage BL cell lines from different tumors, and BL subclones from a single tumor, to compare EBV-negative cells with EBV-positive cells displaying either classical latency I EBV infection (where EBNA1 is the only EBV antigen expressed from the wild-type EBV genome) or Wp-restricted latency (where an EBNA2 gene-deleted virus genome broadens antigen expression to include the EBNA3A, -3B, and -3C proteins and BHRF1). Expression arrays show that both types of endemic BL fall within the mBL classification. However, while EBV-negative and latency I BLs show overlapping profiles, Wp-restricted BLs form a distinct subgroup, characterized by a detectable downregulation of the germinal center (GC)-associated marker Bcl6 and upregulation of genes marking early plasmacytoid differentiation, notably IRF4 and BLIMP1. Importantly, these same changes can be induced in EBV-negative or latency I BL cells by infection with an EBNA2-knockout virus. Thus, we infer that the distinct gene profile of Wp-restricted BLs does not reflect differences in the identity of the tumor progenitor cell per se but differences imposed on a common progenitor by broadened EBV gene expression.
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Early antigen presentation of protective HIV-1 KF11Gag and KK10Gag epitopes from incoming viral particles facilitates rapid recognition of infected cells by specific CD8+ T cells.
J. Virol.
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CD8(+) T cells are major players in antiviral immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) through recognition of viral epitopes presented on the surface of infected cells. However, the early events involving HIV-1 epitope presentation to CD8(+) T cells remain poorly understood but are nonetheless crucial for the rapid clearance of virus-infected cells. Here, we comprehensively studied the kinetics of antigen presentation of two protective epitopes, KF11Gag and KK10Gag, restricted by HLA alleles B*57:01 and B*27:05, respectively, and compared these to KY9Pol and VL9Vpr epitopes in a single cycle of HIV-1 replication. We consistently demonstrate differences in epitope presentation kinetics, with very early presentation, within 3 h postinfection, for the protective KF11Gag, KK10Gag epitopes, and KY9Pol but only late presentation for VL9Vpr. We show that this early presentation relies on the antigen being presented from incoming viral particles and is correlated with rapid CD8(+) T cell activation and clearance of virus-infected cells. Additionally, our data indicate a dose-response dependency between the levels of CD8(+) T cell activation and the amount of virus inoculum. These data reflect a proof of principle emphasizing the importance of identifying early-presented viral epitopes for rapid elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.