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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Adoptive Immunotherapy of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer with V?9V?2 T Cells, Potentiated by Liposomal Alendronic Acid.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2014
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Adoptive immunotherapy using ?? T cells harnesses their natural role in tumor immunosurveillance. The efficacy of this approach is enhanced by aminobisphosphonates such as zoledronic acid and alendronic acid, both of which promote the accumulation of stimulatory phosphoantigens in target cells. However, the inefficient and nonselective uptake of these agents by tumor cells compromises the effective clinical exploitation of this principle. To overcome this, we have encapsulated aminobisphosphonates within liposomes. Expanded V?9V?2 T cells from patients and healthy donors displayed similar phenotype and destroyed autologous and immortalized ovarian tumor cells, following earlier pulsing with either free or liposome-encapsulated aminobisphosphonates. However, liposomal zoledronic acid proved highly toxic to SCID Beige mice. By contrast, the maximum tolerated dose of liposomal alendronic acid was 150-fold higher, rendering it much more suited to in vivo use. When injected into the peritoneal cavity, free and liposomal alendronic acid were both highly effective as sensitizing agents, enabling infused ?? T cells to promote the regression of established ovarian tumors by over one order of magnitude. Importantly however, liposomal alendronic acid proved markedly superior compared with free drug following i.v. delivery, exploiting the "enhanced permeability and retention effect" to render advanced tumors susceptible to ?? T cell-mediated shrinkage. Although folate targeting of liposomes enhanced the sensitization of folate receptor-?(+) ovarian tumor cells in vitro, this did not confer further therapeutic advantage in vivo. These findings support the development of an immunotherapeutic approach for ovarian and other tumors in which adoptively infused ?? T cells are targeted using liposomal alendronic acid.
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The relationship between the diameter of chemically-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their organ biodistribution profiles in vivo.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2014
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Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit unique properties which have led to their applications in the biomedical field as novel delivery systems for diagnosis and therapy purposes. We have previously reported that the degree of functionalization of CNTs is a key factor determining their biological behaviour. The present study broadens the spectrum by investigating the impact of the diameter of CNTs using two series of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs) with distinct differences in their diameters. Both MWNTs were doubly functionalized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and amidation reactions, allowing the appended functional groups to be further conjugated with radionuclide chelating moieties and antibodies or antibody fragments. All constructs possessed comparable degree of functionalization and were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance. The MWNT conjugates were radio-labelled with indium-111, which thereby enabled in vivo single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and organ biodistribution study using ?-scintigraphy. The narrow MWNTs (average diameter: 9.2 nm) demonstrated enhanced tissue affinity including non-reticular endothelial tissues compared to the wider MWNTs (average diameter: 39.5 nm). The results indicate that the higher aspect ratio of narrow MWNTs may be beneficial for their future biological applications due to higher tissue accumulation.
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Development of the designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) G3 for HER2 molecular imaging.
Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
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Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) overexpression is a predictor of response to anti-HER2 therapy in breast and gastric cancer. Currently, HER2 status is assessed by tumour biopsy, but this may not be representative of the larger tumour mass or other metastatic sites, risking misclassification and selection of suboptimal therapy. The designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) G3 binds HER2 with high affinity at an epitope that does not overlap with trastuzumab and is biologically inert. We hypothesized that radiolabelled DARPin G3 would be capable of selectively imaging HER2-positive tumours, and aimed to identify a suitable format for clinical application.
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Prognostic and therapeutic impact of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 control in bladder cancer as monitored longitudinally by PET imaging.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2014
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Targeted therapies have yet to have significant impact on the survival of patients with bladder cancer. In this study, we focused on the urea cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) as a therapeutic target in bladder cancer, based on our discovery of the prognostic and functional import of ASS1 in this setting. ASS1 expression status in bladder tumors from 183 Caucasian and 295 Asian patients was analyzed, along with its hypothesized prognostic impact and association with clinicopathologic features, including tumor size and invasion. Furthermore, the genetics, biology, and therapeutic implications of ASS1 loss were investigated in urothelial cancer cells. We detected ASS1 negativity in 40% of bladder cancers, in which multivariate analysis indicated worse disease-specific and metastasis-free survival. ASS1 loss secondary to epigenetic silencing was accompanied by increased tumor cell proliferation and invasion, consistent with a tumor-suppressor role for ASS1. In developing a treatment approach, we identified a novel targeted antimetabolite strategy to exploit arginine deprivation with pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) as a therapeutic. ADI-PEG20 was synthetically lethal in ASS1-methylated bladder cells and its exposure was associated with a marked reduction in intracellular levels of thymidine, due to suppression of both uptake and de novo synthesis. We found that thymidine uptake correlated with thymidine kinase-1 protein levels and that thymidine levels were imageable with [(18)F]-fluoro-L-thymidine (FLT)-positron emission tomography (PET). In contrast, inhibition of de novo synthesis was linked to decreased expression of thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase. Notably, inhibition of de novo synthesis was associated with potentiation of ADI-PEG20 activity by the antifolate drug pemetrexed. Taken together, our findings argue that arginine deprivation combined with antifolates warrants clinical investigation in ASS1-negative urothelial and related cancers, using FLT-PET as an early surrogate marker of response.
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Preclinical in vivo modeling of cytokine release syndrome induced by ErbB-retargeted human T cells: identifying a window of therapeutic opportunity?
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2013
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The ErbB network is dysregulated in many solid tumors. To exploit this, we have developed a chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) named T1E28z that targets several pathogenetically relevant ErbB dimers. T1E28z is coexpressed with a chimeric cytokine receptor named 4?? (combination termed T4), enabling the selective expansion of engineered T cells using IL-4. Human T4(+) T cells exhibit antitumor activity against several ErbB(+) cancer types. However, ErbB receptors are also expressed in several healthy tissues, raising concerns about toxic potential. In this study, we have evaluated safety of T4 immunotherapy in vivo using a SCID beige mouse model. We show that the human T1E28z CAR efficiently recognizes mouse ErbB(+) cells, rendering this species suitable to evaluate preclinical toxicity. Administration of T4(+) T cells using the i.v. or intratumoral routes achieves partial tumor regression without clinical or histopathologic toxicity. In contrast, when delivered i.p., tumor reduction is accompanied by dose-dependent side effects. Toxicity mediated by T4(+) T cells results from target recognition in both tumor and healthy tissues, leading to release of both human (IL-2/IFN-?) and murine (IL-6) cytokines. In extreme cases, outcome is lethal. Both toxicity and IL-6 release can be ameliorated by prior macrophage depletion, consistent with clinical data that implicate IL-6 in this pathogenic event. These data demonstrate that CAR-induced cytokine release syndrome can be modeled in mice that express target Ag in an appropriate distribution. Furthermore, our findings argue that ErbB-retargeted T cells can achieve therapeutic benefit in the absence of unacceptable toxicity, providing that route of administration and dose are carefully optimized.
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Developments in single photon emission computed tomography and PET-based HER2 molecular imaging for breast cancer.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Molecular imagings of hEGF receptor 2 (HER2) using radiolabeled tracers has the potential to determine the extent of HER2-positive disease and could be of great clinical value. HER2 overexpression affects 20-25% of breast cancer patients, conferring a worse prognosis. HER2 status determines choice and response to therapy but can change in response to treatment and during disease progression. Anti-HER2 agents in development for molecular imaging include immunoglobulins (trastuzumab and pertuzumab), immunoglobulin fragments, F(ab´)2, diabodies, nanobodies and nonimmunoglobulin scaffolds, affibody and designed ankyrin-repeat proteins. Clinical assessment of radiolabeled trastuzumab and anti-HER2 affibody molecule demonstrated potential to identify new lesions but both agents lacked sensitivity and highlighted the need for improved pharmacokinetics. New tracers in the pipeline showed preclinical promise and could potentially improve sensitivity.
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Liver-targeting of interferon-alpha with tissue-specific domain antibodies.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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Interferon alpha (IFN?) is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFN? therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb) specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Our results show that the murine IFN?2 homolog (mIFN?2) fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFN?2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFN?2 or mIFN?2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR) was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections.
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Tumor targeting and imaging with dual-peptide conjugated multifunctional liposomal nanoparticles.
Int J Nanomedicine
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The significant progress in nanotechnology provides a wide spectrum of nanosized material for various applications, including tumor targeting and molecular imaging. The aim of this study was to evaluate multifunctional liposomal nanoparticles for targeting approaches and detection of tumors using different imaging modalities. The concept of dual-targeting was tested in vitro and in vivo using liposomes derivatized with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide binding to ?v?3 integrin receptors and a substance P peptide binding to neurokinin-1 receptors.
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Comparison of biological stability and metabolism of CCK2 receptor targeting peptides, a collaborative project under COST BM0607.
Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2011
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Stability of radiolabelled cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2) receptor targeting peptides has been a major limitation in the use of such radiopharmaceuticals especially for targeted radionuclide therapy applications, e.g. for treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro stability of a series of peptides binding to the CCK2 receptor [selected as part of the COST Action on Targeted Radionuclide Therapy (BM0607)] and to identify major cleavage sites.
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Comparison of the binding and internalization properties of 12 DOTA-coupled and ¹¹¹In-labelled CCK2/gastrin receptor binding peptides: a collaborative project under COST Action BM0607.
Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2011
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Specific overexpression of cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptors has been demonstrated in several tumours of neuroendocrine origin. In some of these cancer types, such as medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), a sensitive diagnostic modality is still unavailable and therapeutic options for inoperable lesions are needed. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may be a viable therapeutic strategy in the management of these patients. Several CCK2R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals have been described in recent years. As part of the European Union COST Action BM0607 we studied the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 12 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated CCK2R binding peptides. In the present study, we analysed binding and internalization characteristics. Stability, biodistribution and imaging studies have been performed in parallel by other centres involved in the project.
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Comparative biodistribution of 12 ¹¹¹In-labelled gastrin/CCK2 receptor-targeting peptides.
Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor overexpression has been demonstrated in various tumours such as medullary thyroid carcinomas and small-cell lung cancers. Due to this high expression, CCK-2 receptors might be suitable targets for radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide therapy. Several CCK-2 receptor-binding radiopeptides have been developed and some have been tested in patients. Here we aimed to compare the in vivo tumour targeting properties of 12 (111)In-labelled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated gastrin/CCK2 receptor-binding peptides.
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Quantitative Accuracy of Low-Count SPECT Imaging in Phantom and In Vivo Mouse Studies.
Int J Mol Imaging
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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We investigated the accuracy of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system in quantifying a wide range of radioactivity concentrations using different scan times in both phantom and animal models. A phantom containing various amounts of In-111 or Tc-99m was imaged until the activity had decayed close to background levels. Scans were acquired for different durations, employing different collimator pinhole sizes. VOI analysis was performed to quantify uptake in the images and the values compared to the true activity. The phantom results were then validated in tumour-bearing mice. The use of an appropriate calibration phantom and disabling of a background subtraction feature meant that absolute errors were within 12% of the true activity. Furthermore, a comparison of in vivo imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed a correlation of 0.99 for activities over the 200?kBq to 5?MBq range. We conclude that the quantitative information provided by the NanoSPECT camera is accurate and allows replacement of dissection studies for assessment of radiotracer biodistribution in mouse models.
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Radiopeptide internalisation and externalization assays: cell viability and radioligand integrity.
Appl Radiat Isot
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2010
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Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalization assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalized peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalized peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times.
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Insertion of a lysosomal enzyme cleavage site into the sequence of a radiolabeled neuropeptide influences cell trafficking in vitro and in vivo.
Cancer Biother. Radiopharm.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2010
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Radiolabeled neuropeptides are widely explored for targeting tumours for either imaging or radiotherapeutic purposes. After binding to their receptors, these peptides are rapidly internalized into lysosomes, where they are degraded by proteolytic enzymes, such as cathepsins. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the inclusion of specific cleavage sites for cathepsin B into the peptide sequence. The cleavage site, GFLG, together with a series of dipeptides for pharmacokinetic modification of radiometabolites, were, therefore, inserted into a peptide that binds to the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. The receptor binding of the peptides was explored in AR42J cells, rates of internalization, and externalization of the radionuclide were measured and the nature of the radiometabolites explored. The effects of the modifications on biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice was explored by high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Differences in rates of externalization from tumor cells in vitro and in the rates of washout from tumor and kidney in vivo were observed. These results indicate that insertion of an enzymatic cleavage site, such as that for cathepsin B, into a neuropeptide appears to have an influence on the intracellular processing, which results in a change in the rate of egress of radioactivity from target and nontarget tissues.
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Targeting of CCK-2 receptor-expressing tumors using a radiolabeled divalent gastrin peptide.
J. Nucl. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2009
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Gastrin/cholecystokinin subtype 2 receptors (CCK-2Rs) are overexpressed in several tumor types and are, thus, a potential target for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of cancer. To improve the in vivo performance of CCK-2R binding peptides, we have previously synthesized and screened a series of divalent gastrin peptides for improved biochemical and biologic characteristics. In this study, we explore in more detail the most promising of these compounds and compare its performance with a previously described monomeric peptide.
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Influence of PEGylation and RGD loading on the targeting properties of radiolabeled liposomal nanoparticles.
Int J Nanomedicine
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Liposomes have been proposed to be a means of selectively targeting cancer sites for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The focus of this work was the evaluation of radiolabeled PEGylated liposomes derivatized with varying amounts of a cyclic arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. RGD peptides are known to bind to ?(v)?(3) integrin receptors overexpressed during tumor-induced angiogenesis.
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Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis.
Eur. J. Nucl. Med. Mol. Imaging
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Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The (111)In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.