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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2014
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Severe cases of environmental or exertional heat stress can lead to varying degrees of organ dysfunction. To understand heat-injury progression and develop efficient management and mitigation strategies, it is critical to determine the thermal response in susceptible organs under different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat, which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal, and extended it to simulate various heat-stress scenarios, including 1) different environmental conditions, 2) exertional heat stress, 3) circadian rhythm effect on the thermal response, and 4) whole-body cooling. Our predictions were consistent with published in vivo temperature measurements for all cases, validating our simulations. We observed a differential thermal response in the organs, with the liver experiencing the highest temperatures for all environmental and exertional heat-stress cases. For every 3°C rise in the external temperature from 40 to 46°C, core and organ temperatures increased by ~0.8°C. Core temperatures increased by 2.6 and 4.1°C for increases in exercise intensity from rest to 75% and 100% of maximal O2 consumption, respectively. We also found differences as large as 0.8°C in organ temperatures for the same heat stress induced at different times during the day. Even after whole-body cooling at a relatively low external temperature (1°C for 20 min), average organ temperatures were still elevated by 2.3 to 2.5°C compared with normothermia. These results can be used to optimize experimental protocol designs, reduce the amount of animal experimentation, and design and test improved heat-stress prevention and management strategies.
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Simulation of B cell affinity maturation explains enhanced antibody cross-reactivity induced by the polyvalent malaria vaccine AMA1.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2014
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Polyvalent vaccines use a mixture of Ags representing distinct pathogen strains to induce an immune response that is cross-reactive and protective. However, such approaches often have mixed results, and it is unclear how polyvalency alters the fine specificity of the Ab response and what those consequences might be for protection. In this article, we present a coarse-grain theoretical model of B cell affinity maturation during monovalent and polyvalent vaccinations that predicts the fine specificity and cross-reactivity of the Ab response. We stochastically simulate affinity maturation using a population dynamics approach in which the host B cell repertoire is represented explicitly, and individual B cell subpopulations undergo rounds of stimulation, mutation, and differentiation. Ags contain multiple epitopes and are present in subpopulations of distinct pathogen strains, each with varying degrees of cross-reactivity at the epitope level. This epitope- and strain-specific model of affinity maturation enables us to study the composition of the polyclonal response in granular detail and identify the mechanisms driving serum specificity and cross-reactivity. We applied this approach to predict the Ab response to a polyvalent vaccine based on the highly polymorphic malaria Ag apical membrane antigen-1. Our simulations show how polyvalent apical membrane Ag-1 vaccination alters the selection pressure during affinity maturation to favor cross-reactive B cells to both conserved and strain-specific epitopes and demonstrate how a polyvalent vaccine with a small number of strains and only moderate allelic coverage may be broadly neutralizing. Our findings suggest that altered fine specificity and enhanced cross-reactivity may be a universal feature of polyvalent vaccines.
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Modeling metabolism and stage-specific growth of Plasmodium falciparum HB3 during the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle.
Mol Biosyst
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2014
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The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum goes through a complex life cycle, including a roughly 48-hour-long intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) in human red blood cells. A better understanding of the metabolic processes required during the asexual blood-stage reproduction will enhance our basic knowledge of P. falciparum and help identify critical metabolic reactions and pathways associated with blood-stage malaria. We developed a metabolic network model that mechanistically links time-dependent gene expression, metabolism, and stage-specific growth, allowing us to predict the metabolic fluxes, the biomass production rates, and the timing of production of the different biomass components during the IDC. We predicted time- and stage-specific production of precursors and macromolecules for P. falciparum (strain HB3), allowing us to link specific metabolites to specific physiological functions. For example, we hypothesized that coenzyme A might be involved in late-IDC DNA replication and cell division. Moreover, the predicted ATP metabolism indicated that energy was mainly produced from glycolysis and utilized for non-metabolic processes. Finally, we used the model to classify the entire tricarboxylic acid cycle into segments, each with a distinct function, such as superoxide detoxification, glutamate/glutamine processing, and metabolism of fumarate as a byproduct of purine biosynthesis. By capturing the normal metabolic and growth progression in P. falciparum during the IDC, our model provides a starting point for further elucidation of strain-specific metabolic activity, host-parasite interactions, stress-induced metabolic responses, and metabolic responses to antimalarial drugs and drug candidates.
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Human core temperature prediction for heat-injury prevention.
IEEE J Biomed Health Inform
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2014
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Previously, our group developed auto-regressive (AR) models to predict human core temperature and help prevent hyperthermia (temperature > 39 oC). However, the models often yielded delayed predictions, limiting their application as a real-time warning system. To mitigate this problem, here we combined AR-model point estimates with statistically derived prediction intervals (PIs) and assessed the performance of three new alert algorithms [AR model plus PI, median filter of AR model plus PI decisions, and an adaptation of the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT)]. Using field-study data from 22 Soldiers, including five subjects who experienced hyperthermia, we assessed the alert algorithms for AR-model prediction windows from 15-30 min. Cross-validation simulations showed that, as the prediction windows increased, improvements in the algorithms' effective prediction horizons were offset by deteriorating accuracy, with a 20-min window providing a reasonable compromise. Model plus PI and SPRT yielded the largest effective prediction horizons (? 18 min), but these were offset by other performance measures. If high sensitivity and a long effective prediction horizon are desired, model plus PI provides the best choice, assuming decision switches can be tolerated. In contrast, if a small number of decision switches are desired, SPRT provides the best compromise as an early warning system of impending heat illnesses.
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Kinetic model facilitates analysis of fibrin generation and its modulation by clotting factors: implications for hemostasis-enhancing therapies.
Mol Biosyst
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2014
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Current mechanistic knowledge of protein interactions driving blood coagulation has come largely from experiments with simple synthetic systems, which only partially represent the molecular composition of human blood plasma. Here, we investigate the ability of the suggested molecular mechanisms to account for fibrin generation and degradation kinetics in diverse, physiologically relevant in vitro systems. We represented the protein interaction network responsible for thrombin generation, fibrin formation, and fibrinolysis as a computational kinetic model and benchmarked it against published and newly generated data reflecting diverse experimental conditions. We then applied the model to investigate the ability of fibrinogen and a recently proposed prothrombin complex concentrate composition, PCC-AT (a combination of the clotting factors II, IX, X, and antithrombin), to restore normal thrombin and fibrin generation in diluted plasma. The kinetic model captured essential features of empirically detected effects of prothrombin, fibrinogen, and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor titrations on fibrin formation and degradation kinetics. Moreover, the model qualitatively predicted the impact of tissue factor and tPA/tenecteplase level variations on the fibrin output. In the majority of considered cases, PCC-AT combined with fibrinogen accurately approximated both normal thrombin and fibrin generation in diluted plasma, which could not be accomplished by fibrinogen or PCC-AT acting alone. We conclude that a common network of protein interactions can account for key kinetic features characterizing fibrin accumulation and degradation in human blood plasma under diverse experimental conditions. Combined PCC-AT/fibrinogen supplementation is a promising strategy to reverse the deleterious effects of dilution-induced coagulopathy associated with traumatic bleeding.
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A systems biology strategy to identify molecular mechanisms of action and protein indicators of traumatic brain injury.
J. Neurosci. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2014
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The multifactorial nature of traumatic brain injury (TBI), especially the complex secondary tissue injury involving intertwined networks of molecular pathways that mediate cellular behavior, has confounded attempts to elucidate the pathology underlying the progression of TBI. Here, systems biology strategies are exploited to identify novel molecular mechanisms and protein indicators of brain injury. To this end, we performed a meta-analysis of four distinct high-throughput gene expression studies involving different animal models of TBI. By using canonical pathways and a large human protein-interaction network as a scaffold, we separately overlaid the gene expression data from each study to identify molecular signatures that were conserved across the different studies. At 24 hr after injury, the significantly activated molecular signatures were nonspecific to TBI, whereas the significantly suppressed molecular signatures were specific to the nervous system. In particular, we identified a suppressed subnetwork consisting of 58 highly interacting, coregulated proteins associated with synaptic function. We selected three proteins from this subnetwork, postsynaptic density protein 95, nitric oxide synthase 1, and disrupted in schizophrenia 1, and hypothesized that their abundance would be significantly reduced after TBI. In a penetrating ballistic-like brain injury rat model of severe TBI, Western blot analysis confirmed our hypothesis. In addition, our analysis recovered 12 previously identified protein biomarkers of TBI. The results suggest that systems biology may provide an efficient, high-yield approach to generate testable hypotheses that can be experimentally validated to identify novel mechanisms of action and molecular indicators of TBI. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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A computational study of the respiratory airflow characteristics in normal and obstructed human airways.
Comput. Biol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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Obstructive lung diseases in the lower airways are a leading health concern worldwide. To improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of lower airways, we studied airflow characteristics in the lung between the 8th and the 14th generations using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, where we compared normal and obstructed airways for a range of breathing conditions. We employed a novel technique based on computing the Pearson?s correlation coefficient to quantitatively characterize the differences in airflow patterns between the normal and obstructed airways. We found that the airflow patterns demonstrated clear differences between normal and diseased conditions for high expiratory flow rates (>2300ml/s), but not for inspiratory flow rates. Moreover, airflow patterns subjected to filtering demonstrated higher sensitivity than airway resistance for differentiating normal and diseased conditions. Further, we showed that wall shear stresses were not only dependent on breathing rates, but also on the distribution of the obstructed sites in the lung: for the same degree of obstruction and breathing rate, we observed as much as two-fold differences in shear stresses. In contrast to previous studies that suggest increased wall shear stress due to obstructions as a possible damage mechanism for small airways, our model demonstrated that for flow rates corresponding to heavy activities, the wall shear stress in both normal and obstructed airways was <0.3Pa, which is within the physiological limit needed to promote respiratory defense mechanisms. In summary, our model enables the study of airflow characteristics that may be impractical to assess experimentally.
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DBSecSys: a database of Burkholderia mallei secretion systems.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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Bacterial pathogenicity represents a major public health concern worldwide. Secretion systems are a key component of bacterial pathogenicity, as they provide the means for bacterial proteins to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert themselves directly into the host cells' cytosol. Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that uses multiple secretion systems during its host infection life cycle. To date, the identities of secretion system proteins for B. mallei are not well known, and their pathogenic mechanisms of action and host factors are largely uncharacterized.
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Dose-dependent model of caffeine effects on human vigilance during total sleep deprivation.
J. Theor. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant to counter sleep-loss effects. While the pharmacokinetics of caffeine in the body is well-understood, its alertness-restoring effects are still not well characterized. In fact, mathematical models capable of predicting the effects of varying doses of caffeine on objective measures of vigilance are not available. In this paper, we describe a phenomenological model of the dose-dependent effects of caffeine on psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance of sleep-deprived subjects. We used the two-process model of sleep regulation to quantify performance during sleep loss in the absence of caffeine and a dose-dependent multiplier factor derived from the Hill equation to model the effects of single and repeated caffeine doses. We developed and validated the model fits and predictions on PVT lapse (number of reaction times exceeding 500 ms) data from two separate laboratory studies. At the population-average level, the model captured the effects of a range of caffeine doses (50-300 mg), yielding up to a 90% improvement over the two-process model. Individual-specific caffeine models, on average, predicted the effects up to 23% better than population-average caffeine models. The proposed model serves as a useful tool for predicting the dose-dependent effects of caffeine on the PVT performance of sleep-deprived subjects and, therefore, can be used for determining caffeine doses that optimize the timing and duration of peak performance.
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Computational approach to characterize causative factors and molecular indicators of chronic wound inflammation.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2014
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Chronic inflammation is rapidly becoming recognized as a key contributor to numerous pathologies. Despite detailed investigations, understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating inflammation is incomplete. Knowledge of such critical regulatory processes and informative indicators of chronic inflammation is necessary for efficacious therapeutic interventions and diagnostic support to clinicians. We used a computational modeling approach to elucidate the critical factors responsible for chronic inflammation and to identify robust molecular indicators of chronic inflammatory conditions. Our kinetic model successfully captured experimentally observed cell and cytokine dynamics for both acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Using sensitivity analysis, we identified macrophage influx and efflux rate modulation as the strongest inducing factor of chronic inflammation for a wide range of scenarios. Moreover, our model predicted that, among all major inflammatory mediators, IL-6, TGF-?, and PDGF may generally be considered the most sensitive and robust indicators of chronic inflammation, which is supported by existing, but limited, experimental evidence.
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Exploiting large-scale drug-protein interaction information for computational drug repurposing.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Despite increased investment in pharmaceutical research and development, fewer and fewer new drugs are entering the marketplace. This has prompted studies in repurposing existing drugs for use against diseases with unmet medical needs. A popular approach is to develop a classification model based on drugs with and without a desired therapeutic effect. For this approach to be statistically sound, it requires a large number of drugs in both classes. However, given few or no approved drugs for the diseases of highest medical urgency and interest, different strategies need to be investigated.
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Prediction of metabolic flux distribution from gene expression data based on the flux minimization principle.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Prediction of possible flux distributions in a metabolic network provides detailed phenotypic information that links metabolism to cellular physiology. To estimate metabolic steady-state fluxes, the most common approach is to solve a set of macroscopic mass balance equations subjected to stoichiometric constraints while attempting to optimize an assumed optimal objective function. This assumption is justifiable in specific cases but may be invalid when tested across different conditions, cell populations, or other organisms. With an aim to providing a more consistent and reliable prediction of flux distributions over a wide range of conditions, in this article we propose a framework that uses the flux minimization principle to predict active metabolic pathways from mRNA expression data. The proposed algorithm minimizes a weighted sum of flux magnitudes, while biomass production can be bounded to fit an ample range from very low to very high values according to the analyzed context. We have formulated the flux weights as a function of the corresponding enzyme reaction's gene expression value, enabling the creation of context-specific fluxes based on a generic metabolic network. In case studies of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and wild-type and mutant Escherichia coli strains, our method achieved high prediction accuracy, as gauged by correlation coefficients and sums of squared error, with respect to the experimentally measured values. In contrast to other approaches, our method was able to provide quantitative predictions for both model organisms under a variety of conditions. Our approach requires no prior knowledge or assumption of a context-specific metabolic functionality and does not require trial-and-error parameter adjustments. Thus, our framework is of general applicability for modeling the transcription-dependent metabolism of bacteria and yeasts.
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Quantitative modeling of virus evolutionary dynamics and adaptation in serial passages using empirically inferred fitness landscapes.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2013
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We describe a stochastic virus evolution model representing genomic diversification and within-host selection during experimental serial passages under cell culture or live-host conditions. The model incorporates realistic descriptions of the virus genotypes in nucleotide and amino acid sequence spaces, as well as their diversification from error-prone replications. It quantitatively considers factors such as target cell number, bottleneck size, passage period, infection and cell death rates, and the replication rate of different genotypes, allowing for systematic examinations of how their changes affect the evolutionary dynamics of viruses during passages. The relative probability for a viral population to achieve adaptation under a new host environment, quantified by the rate with which a target sequence frequency rises above 50%, was found to be most sensitive to factors related to sequence structure (distance from the wild type to the target) and selection strength (host cell number and bottleneck size). For parameter values representative of RNA viruses, the likelihood of observing adaptations during passages became negligible as the required number of mutations rose above two amino acid sites. We modeled the specific adaptation process of influenza A H5N1 viruses in mammalian hosts by simulating the evolutionary dynamics of H5 strains under the fitness landscape inferred from multiple sequence alignments of H3 proteins. In light of comparisons with experimental findings, we observed that the evolutionary dynamics of adaptation is strongly affected not only by the tendency toward increasing fitness values but also by the accessibility of pathways between genotypes constrained by the genetic code.
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A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats during thermal stress.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2013
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Early prediction of the adverse outcomes associated with heat stress is critical for effective management and mitigation of injury, which may sometimes lead to extreme undesirable clinical conditions, such as multiorgan dysfunction syndrome and death. Here, we developed a computational model to predict the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in a rat exposed to heat stress in an attempt to understand the correlation between heat load and differential organ dysfunction. The model includes a three-dimensional representation of the rat anatomy obtained from medical imaging and incorporates the key mechanisms of heat transfer during thermoregulation. We formulated a novel approach to estimate blood temperature by accounting for blood mixing from the different organs and to estimate the effects of the circadian rhythm in body temperature by considering day-night variations in metabolic heat generation and blood perfusion. We validated the model using in vivo core temperature measurements in control and heat-stressed rats and other published experimental data. The model predictions were within 1 SD of the measured data. The liver demonstrated the greatest susceptibility to heat stress, with the maximum temperature reaching 2°C higher than the measured core temperature and 95% of its volume exceeding the targeted experimental core temperature. Other organs also attained temperatures greater than the core temperature, illustrating the need to monitor multiple organs during heat stress. The model facilitates the identification of organ-specific risks during heat stress and has the potential to aid in the development of improved clinical strategies for thermal-injury prevention and management.
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Computational analysis of the effects of reduced temperature on thrombin generation: the contributions of hypothermia to coagulopathy.
Anesth. Analg.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Hypothermia, which can result from tissue hypoperfusion, body exposure, and transfusion of cold resuscitation fluids, is a major factor contributing to coagulopathy of trauma and surgery. Despite considerable efforts, the mechanisms of hypothermia-induced blood coagulation impairment have not been fully understood. We introduce a kinetic modeling approach to investigate the effects of hypothermia on thrombin generation.
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Bridging the gap between gene expression and metabolic phenotype via kinetic models.
BMC Syst Biol
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2013
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Despite the close association between gene expression and metabolism, experimental evidence shows that gene expression levels alone cannot predict metabolic phenotypes, indicating a knowledge gap in our understanding of how these processes are connected. Here, we present a method that integrates transcriptome, fluxome, and metabolome data using kinetic models to create a mechanistic link between gene expression and metabolism.
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Novel Burkholderia mallei virulence factors linked to specific host-pathogen protein interactions.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cells cytosol. However, the secretion systems proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement processes.
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Reconstituting protein interaction networks using parameter-dependent domain-domain interactions.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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We can describe protein-protein interactions (PPIs) as sets of distinct domain-domain interactions (DDIs) that mediate the physical interactions between proteins. Experimental data confirm that DDIs are more consistent than their corresponding PPIs, lending support to the notion that analyses of DDIs may improve our understanding of PPIs and lead to further insights into cellular function, disease, and evolution. However, currently available experimental DDI data cover only a small fraction of all existing PPIs and, in the absence of structural data, determining which particular DDI mediates any given PPI is a challenge.
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Systems biology approaches for discovering biomarkers for traumatic brain injury.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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The rate of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in service members with wartime injuries has risen rapidly in recent years, and complex, variable links have emerged between TBI and long-term neurological disorders. The multifactorial nature of TBI secondary cellular response has confounded attempts to find cellular biomarkers for its diagnosis and prognosis or for guiding therapy for brain injury. One possibility is to apply emerging systems biology strategies to holistically probe and analyze the complex interweaving molecular pathways and networks that mediate the secondary cellular response through computational models that integrate these diverse data sets. Here, we review available systems biology strategies, databases, and tools. In addition, we describe opportunities for applying this methodology to existing TBI data sets to identify new biomarker candidates and gain insights about the underlying molecular mechanisms of TBI response. As an exemplar, we apply network and pathway analysis to a manually compiled list of 32 protein biomarker candidates from the literature, recover known TBI-related mechanisms, and generate hypothetical new biomarker candidates.
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A unified mathematical model to quantify performance impairment for both chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation.
J. Theor. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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Performance prediction models based on the classical two-process model of sleep regulation are reasonably effective at predicting alertness and neurocognitive performance during total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, during sleep restriction (partial sleep loss) performance predictions based on such models have been found to be less accurate. Because most modern operational environments are predominantly characterized by chronic sleep restriction (CSR) rather than by episodic TSD, the practical utility of this class of models has been limited. To better quantify performance during both CSR and TSD, we developed a unified mathematical model that incorporates extant sleep debt as a function of a known sleep/wake history, with recent history exerting greater influence. This incorporation of sleep/wake history into the classical two-process model captures an individuals capacity to recover during sleep as a function of sleep debt and naturally bridges the continuum from CSR to TSD by reducing to the classical two-process model in the case of TSD. We validated the proposed unified model using psychomotor vigilance task data from three prior studies involving TSD, CSR, and sleep extension. We compared and contrasted the fits, within-study predictions, and across-study predictions from the unified model against predictions generated by two previously published models, and found that the unified model more accurately represented multiple experimental studies and consistently predicted sleep restriction scenarios better than the existing models. In addition, we found that the model parameters obtained by fitting TSD data could be used to predict performance in other sleep restriction scenarios for the same study populations, and vice versa. Furthermore, this model better accounted for the relatively slow recovery process that is known to characterize CSR, as well as the enhanced performance that has been shown to result from sleep banking.
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Predicting human subcutaneous glucose concentration in real time: a universal data-driven approach.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices measure and record a patients subcutaneous glucose concentration as frequently as every minute for up to several days. When coupled with data-driven mathematical models, CGM data can be used for short-term prediction of glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In this study, we present a real-time implementation of a previously developed offline data-driven algorithm. The implementation consists of a Kalman filter for real-time filtering of CGM data and a data-driven autoregressive model for prediction. Results based on CGM data from 3 different studies involving 34 type 1 and 2 diabetic patients suggest that the proposed real-time approach can yield ~10-min-ahead predictions with clinically acceptable accuracy and, hence, could be useful as a tool for warning against impending glucose deregulation episodes. The results further support the feasibility of "universal" glucose prediction models, where an offline-developed model based on one individuals data can be used to predict the glucose levels of any other individual in real time.
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Using confidence intervals to assess the reliability of instantaneous heart rate and respiratory rate.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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Physiological waveform signals collected from unstructured environments are noisy, requiring automated algorithms to assess the reliability of the derived vital signs, such as heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR), before they can be used for automated decision support. We recently proposed a weighted regularized least squares method to estimate instantaneous HR (HR(R)), which readily provides analytically based confidence intervals (CIs). Accordingly, this method can be extended to the estimation of instantaneous RR (RR(R)). In this study, we aim to investigate whether we can use CIs to select reliable HR(R) and RR(R). We calculated HR(R) and RR(R) for 532 and 370 trauma patients, respectively, grouped the rates according to their CIs, and investigated their reliability by determining their ability to diagnose major hemorrhage. The areas under a receiver operating characteristic curve of HR(R) and RR(R) with CI ? 5 bpm (beats per minute for HR and breaths per minute for RR) were 0.70 and 0.66, respectively. RR(R) was superior to the average output of the clinical monitor (p < 0.05 by DeLongs test), while HR(R) was equivalent. HR(R) and RR(R) provide a new approach to systematically and automatically assess the reliability of noisy, field-collected vital signs.
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Categorizing biases in high-confidence high-throughput protein-protein interaction data sets.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2011
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We characterized and evaluated the functional attributes of three yeast high-confidence protein-protein interaction data sets derived from affinity purification/mass spectrometry, protein-fragment complementation assay, and yeast two-hybrid experiments. The interacting proteins retrieved from these data sets formed distinct, partially overlapping sets with different protein-protein interaction characteristics. These differences were primarily a function of the deployed experimental technologies used to recover these interactions. This affected the total coverage of interactions and was especially evident in the recovery of interactions among different functional classes of proteins. We found that the interaction data obtained by the yeast two-hybrid method was the least biased toward any particular functional characterization. In contrast, interacting proteins in the affinity purification/mass spectrometry and protein-fragment complementation assay data sets were over- and under-represented among distinct and different functional categories. We delineated how these differences affected protein complex organization in the network of interactions, in particular for strongly interacting complexes (e.g. RNA and protein synthesis) versus weak and transient interacting complexes (e.g. protein transport). We quantified methodological differences in detecting protein interactions from larger protein complexes, in the correlation of protein abundance among interacting proteins, and in their connectivity of essential proteins. In the latter case, we showed that minimizing inherent methodology biases removed many of the ambiguous conclusions about protein essentiality and protein connectivity. We used these findings to rationalize how biological insights obtained by analyzing data sets originating from different sources sometimes do not agree or may even contradict each other. An important corollary of this work was that discrepancies in biological insights did not necessarily imply that one detection methodology was better or worse, but rather that, to a large extent, the insights reflected the methodological biases themselves. Consequently, interpreting the protein interaction data within their experimental or cellular context provided the best avenue for overcoming biases and inferring biological knowledge.
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Modeling synergistic drug inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth in murine macrophages.
Mol Biosyst
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2011
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We developed a metabolism-based systems biology framework to model drug-induced growth inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage cells. We used it to simulate ex vivo bacterial growth inhibition due to 3-nitropropionate (3-NP) and calculated the corresponding time- and drug concentration-dependent dose-response curves. 3-NP targets the isocitrate lyase 1 (ICL1) and ICL2 enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt, an essential component in carbon metabolism of many important prokaryotic organisms. We used the framework to in silico mimic drugging additional enzymes in combination with 3-NP to understand how synergy can arise among metabolic enzyme targets. In particular, we focused on exploring additional targets among the central carbon metabolism pathways and ascertaining the impact of jointly inhibiting these targets and the ICL1/ICL2 enzymes. Thus, additionally inhibiting the malate synthase (MS) enzyme in the glyoxylate shunt did not produce synergistic effects, whereas additional inhibition of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PD) enzyme showed a reduction in bacterial growth beyond what each single inhibition could achieve. Whereas the ICL1/ICL2-MS pair essentially works on the same branch of the metabolic pathway processing lipids as carbon sources (the glyoxylate shunt), the ICL1/ICL2-G3PD pair inhibition targets different branches among the lipid utilization pathways. This allowed the ICL1/ICL2-G3PD drug combination to synergistically inhibit carbon processing and ultimately affect cellular growth. Our previously developed model for in vitro conditions failed to capture these effects, highlighting the importance of constructing accurate representations of the experimental ex vivo macrophage system.
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SNIT: SNP identification for strain typing.
Source Code Biol Med
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2011
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With ever-increasing numbers of microbial genomes being sequenced, efficient tools are needed to perform strain-level identification of any newly sequenced genome. Here, we present the SNP identification for strain typing (SNIT) pipeline, a fast and accurate software system that compares a newly sequenced bacterial genome with other genomes of the same species to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels). Based on this information, the pipeline analyzes the polymorphic loci present in all input genomes to identify the genome that has the fewest differences with the newly sequenced genome. Similarly, for each of the other genomes, SNIT identifies the input genome with the fewest differences. Results from five bacterial species show that the SNIT pipeline identifies the correct closest neighbor with 75% to 100% accuracy. The SNIT pipeline is available for download at http://www.bhsai.org/snit.html.
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QuartetS: a fast and accurate algorithm for large-scale orthology detection.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2011
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The unparalleled growth in the availability of genomic data offers both a challenge to develop orthology detection methods that are simultaneously accurate and high throughput and an opportunity to improve orthology detection by leveraging evolutionary evidence in the accumulated sequenced genomes. Here, we report a novel orthology detection method, termed QuartetS, that exploits evolutionary evidence in a computationally efficient manner. Based on the well-established evolutionary concept that gene duplication events can be used to discriminate homologous genes, QuartetS uses an approximate phylogenetic analysis of quartet gene trees to infer the occurrence of duplication events and discriminate paralogous from orthologous genes. We used function- and phylogeny-based metrics to perform a large-scale, systematic comparison of the orthology predictions of QuartetS with those of four other methods [bi-directional best hit (BBH), outgroup, OMA and QuartetS-C (QuartetS followed by clustering)], involving 624 bacterial genomes and >2 million genes. We found that QuartetS slightly, but consistently, outperformed the highly specific OMA method and that, while consuming only 0.5% additional computational time, QuartetS predicted 50% more orthologs with a 50% lower false positive rate than the widely used BBH method. We conclude that, for large-scale phylogenetic and functional analysis, QuartetS and QuartetS-C should be preferred, respectively, in applications where high accuracy and high throughput are required.
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Kinetic modeling sheds light on the mode of action of recombinant factor VIIa on thrombin generation.
Thromb. Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2011
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The therapeutic potential of a hemostatic agent can be assessed by investigating its effects on the quantitative parameters of thrombin generation. For recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa)--a promising hemostasis-inducing biologic--experimental studies addressing its effects on thrombin generation yielded disparate results. To elucidate the inherent ability of rFVIIa to modulate thrombin production, it is necessary to identify rFVIIa-induced effects that are compatible with the available biochemical knowledge about thrombin generation mechanisms.
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AGeS: a software system for microbial genome sequence annotation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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The annotation of genomes from next-generation sequencing platforms needs to be rapid, high-throughput, and fully integrated and automated. Although a few Web-based annotation services have recently become available, they may not be the best solution for researchers that need to annotate a large number of genomes, possibly including proprietary data, and store them locally for further analysis. To address this need, we developed a standalone software application, the Annotation of microbial Genome Sequences (AGeS) system, which incorporates publicly available and in-house-developed bioinformatics tools and databases, many of which are parallelized for high-throughput performance.
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Exploration of prehospital vital sign trends for the prediction of trauma outcomes.
J Spec Oper Med
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2010
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We explored whether there are diagnostically useful temporal trends in prehospital vital signs of trauma patients.
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Unraveling the conundrum of seemingly discordant protein-protein interaction datasets.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2010
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Most high-throughput experimental results of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are seemingly inconsistent with each other. In this article, we re-evaluated these contradictions within the context of the underlying domain-domain interactions (DDIs) for two Escherichia coli and four Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPI datasets derived from high-throughput (yeast two-hybrid and tandem affinity purification) experimental platforms. For shared DDIs across pairs of compared datasets, we observed a remarkably high pair-wise correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient between 0.80 and 0.84) between datasets of the same organism derived from the same experimental platform. To a lesser degree, this concordance also held true for more general inter-platform and intra-species comparisons (Pearson correlation coefficient between 0.52 and 0.89). Thus, although varying experimental conditions can influence the ability of individual proteins to interact and, therefore, create apparent differences among PPIs, the physical nature of the underlying interactions, captured by DDIs, is the same and can be used to model and predict PPIs.
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A robust method to estimate instantaneous heart rate from noisy electrocardiogram waveforms.
Ann Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2010
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We propose a new algorithm for real-time estimation of instantaneous heart rate (HR) from noise-laden electrocardiogram (ECG) waveforms typical of unstructured, ambulatory field environments. The estimation of HR from ECG waveforms is an indirect measurement problem that requires differencing, which invariably amplifies high-frequency noise. We circumvented noise amplification by considering the estimation of HR as the solution of a weighted regularized least squares problem, which, in addition, directly provided analytically based confidence intervals (CIs) for the estimated HRs. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we applied it to simulated data and to noise-laden ECG records that were collected during helicopter transport of trauma-injured patients to a trauma center. We compared the proposed algorithm with HR estimates produced by a widely used vital-sign travel monitor and a standard HR estimation technique, followed by postprocessing with Kalman filtering or spline smoothing. The simulation results indicated that our algorithm consistently produced more accurate HR estimates, with estimation errors as much as 67% smaller than those attained by the postprocessing methods, while the results with the field-collected data showed that the proposed algorithm produced much smoother and reliable HR estimates than those obtained by the vital-sign monitor. Moreover, the obtained CIs reflected the amount of noise in the ECG recording and could be used to statistically quantify uncertainties in the HR estimates. We conclude that the proposed method is robust to different types of noise and is particularly suitable for use in ambulatory environments where data quality is notoriously poor.
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Update on mathematical modeling research to support the development of automated insulin delivery systems.
J Diabetes Sci Technol
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2010
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One year after its initial meeting, the Glycemia Modeling Working Group reconvened during the 2009 Diabetes Technology Meeting in San Francisco, CA. The discussion, involving 39 scientists, again focused on the need for individual investigators to have access to the clinical data required to develop and refine models of glucose metabolism, the need to understand the differences among the distinct models and control algorithms, and the significance of day-to-day subject variability. The key conclusion was that model-based comparisons of different control algorithms, or the models themselves, are limited by the inability to access individual model-patient parameters. It was widely agreed that these parameters, as opposed to the average parameters that are typically reported, are necessary to perform such comparisons. However, the prevailing view was that, if investigators were to make the parameters available, it would limit their ability (and that of their institution) to benefit from the invested work in developing their models. A general agreement was reached regarding the importance of each model having an insulin pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile that is not different from profiles reported in the literature (88% of the respondents agreed that the model should have similar curves or be analyzed separately) and the importance of capturing intraday variance in insulin sensitivity (91% of the respondents indicated that this could result in changes in fasting glucose of >or=15%, with 52% of the respondents believing that the variability could effect changes of >or=30%). Seventy-six percent of the participants indicated that high-fat meals were thought to effect changes in other model parameters in addition to gastric emptying. There was also widespread consensus as to how a closed-loop controller should respond to day-to-day changes in model parameters (with 76% of the participants indicating that fasting glucose should be within 15% of target, with 30% of the participants believing that it should be at target). The group was evenly divided as to whether the glucose sensor per se continues to be the major obstacle in achieving closed-loop control. Finally, virtually all participants agreed that a future two-day workshop should be organized to compare, contrast, and understand the differences among the different models and control algorithms.
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The importance of different frequency bands in predicting subcutaneous glucose concentration in type 1 diabetic patients.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2010
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We investigated the relative importance and predictive power of different frequency bands of subcutaneous glucose signals for the short-term (0-50 min) forecasting of glucose concentrations in type 1 diabetic patients with data-driven autoregressive (AR) models. The study data consisted of minute-by-minute glucose signals collected from nine deidentified patients over a five-day period using continuous glucose monitoring devices. AR models were developed using single and pairwise combinations of frequency bands of the glucose signal and compared with a reference model including all bands. The results suggest that: for open-loop applications, there is no need to explicitly represent exogenous inputs, such as meals and insulin intake, in AR models; models based on a single-frequency band, with periods between 60-120 min and 150-500 min, yield good predictive power (error <3 mg/dL) for prediction horizons of up to 25 min; models based on pairs of bands produce predictions that are indistinguishable from those of the reference model as long as the 60-120 min period band is included; and AR models can be developed on signals of short length (approximately 300 min), i.e., ignoring long circadian rhythms, without any detriment in prediction accuracy. Together, these findings provide insights into efficient development of more effective and parsimonious data-driven models for short-term prediction of glucose concentrations in diabetic patients.
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A real-time algorithm for predicting core temperature in humans.
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
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In this paper, we present a real-time implementation of a previously developed offline algorithm for predicting core temperature in humans. The real-time algorithm uses a zero-phase Butterworth digital filter to smooth the data and an autoregressive (AR) model to predict core temperature. The performance of the algorithm is assessed in terms of its prediction accuracy, quantified by the root mean squared error (RMSE), and in terms of prediction uncertainty, quantified by statistically based prediction intervals (PIs). To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, we simulated real-time implementation using core-temperature data collected during two different field studies, involving ten different individuals. One of the studies includes a case of heat illness suffered by one of the participants. The results indicate that although the real-time predictions yielded RMSEs that are larger than those of the offline algorithm, the real-time algorithm does produce sufficiently accurate predictions for practically meaningful prediction horizons (approximately 20 min). The algorithm reached alert (39 degrees C) and alarm (39.5 degrees C) thresholds for the heat-ill individual but did not even attain the alert threshold for the other individuals, demonstrating the algorithms good sensitivity and specificity. The PIs reflected, in an intuitively expected manner, the uncertainty associated with real-time forecast as a function of prediction horizon and core-temperature variability. The results also corroborate the feasibility of "universal" AR models, where an offline-developed model based on one individuals data could be used to predict any other individual in real time. We conclude that the real-time implementation of the algorithm confirms the attributes observed in the offline version and, hence, could be considered as a warning tool for impending heat illnesses.
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Development and analysis of an in vivo-compatible metabolic network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
BMC Syst Biol
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2010
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During infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis confronts a generally hostile and nutrient-poor in vivo host environment. Existing models and analyses of M. tuberculosis metabolic networks are able to reproduce experimentally measured cellular growth rates and identify genes required for growth in a range of different in vitro media. However, these models, under in vitro conditions, do not provide an adequate description of the metabolic processes required by the pathogen to infect and persist in a host.
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Is respiration-induced variation in the photoplethysmogram associated with major hypovolemia in patients with acute traumatic injuries?
Shock
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2010
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It has been widely accepted that metrics related to respiration-induced waveform variation (RIWV) of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) have been associated with hypovolemia in mechanically ventilated patients and in controlled laboratory environments. In this retrospective study, we investigated if PPG RIWV metrics have diagnostic value for patients with acute hemorrhagic hypovolemia in the prehospital environment. Photoplethysmogram waveforms and basic vital signs were recorded in trauma patients during prehospital transport. Retrospectively, we used automated algorithms to select patient records with all five basic vital signs and 45 s or longer continuous, clean PPG segments. From these segments, we identified the onset and peak of individual heartbeats and computed waveform variations in the beats peaks and amplitudes: (1) as the range between the maximum and the minimum (max-min) values and (2) as their interquartile range (IQR). We evaluated their receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for major hemorrhage. Separately, we tested whether RIWV metrics have potential independent information beyond basic vital signs by applying multivariate regression. In 344 patients, RIWV max-min yielded areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) not significantly better than a random AUC of 0.50. Respiration-induced waveform variation computed as IQR yielded ROC AUCs of 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.76) and of 0.64 (0.51-0.75), for peak and amplitude measures, respectively. The IQR metrics added independent information to basic vital signs (P < 0.05), but only moderately improved the overall AUC. Photoplethysmogram RIWV measured as IQR is preferable over max-min, and using PPG RIWV may enhance physiologic monitoring of spontaneously breathing patients outside strictly controlled laboratory environments.
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A high-throughput pipeline for the design of real-time PCR signatures.
BMC Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2010
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Pathogen diagnostic assays based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology provide high sensitivity and specificity. However, the design of these diagnostic assays is computationally intensive, requiring high-throughput methods to identify unique PCR signatures in the presence of an ever increasing availability of sequenced genomes.
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Automated beat onset and peak detection algorithm for field-collected photoplethysmograms.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2009
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Recent reports suggest that photoplethysmography (PPG), which is a component of routine pulse oximetry, may be useful for detecting hypovolemia. An essential step in extracting and analyzing common PPG features is the robust identification of onset and peak locations of the vascular beats, despite varying beat morphologies and major oscillations in the baseline. Some prior reports used manual analysis of the PPG waveform; however, for systematic widespread use, an automated method is required. In this paper, we report an algorithm that automatically detects beat onsets and peaks from noisy field-collected PPG waveforms. We validated the algorithm by clinician evaluation of 100 randomly selected PPG waveform samples. For 99% of the beats, the algorithm was able to credibly identify the onsets and peaks of vascular beats, although the precise locations were ambiguous, given the very noisy data from actual clinical operations. The algorithm appears promising, and future consideration of its diagnostic capabilities and limitations is warranted.
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A platform for testing and comparing of real-time decision-support algorithms in mobile environments.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2009
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The unavailability of a flexible system for realtime testing of decision-support algorithms in a pre-hospital clinical setting has limited their use. In this study, we describe a plug-and-play platform for real-time testing of decision-support algorithms during the transport of trauma casualties en route to a hospital. The platform integrates a standard-of-care vital-signs monitor, which collects numeric and waveform physiologic time-series data, with a rugged ultramobile personal computer. The computer time-stamps and stores data received from the monitor, and performs analysis on the collected data in real-time. Prior to field deployment, we assessed the performance of each component of the platform by using an emulator to simulate a number of possible fault scenarios that could be encountered in the field. Initial testing with the emulator allowed us to identify and fix software inconsistencies and showed that the platform can support a quick development cycle for real-time decision-support algorithms.
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An improved methodology for individualized performance prediction of sleep-deprived individuals with the two-process model.
Sleep
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2009
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We present a method based on the two-process model of sleep regulation for developing individualized biomathematical models that predict performance impairment for individuals subjected to total sleep loss. This new method advances our previous work in two important ways. First, it enables model customization to start as soon as the first performance measurement from an individual becomes available. This was achieved by optimally combining the performance information obtained from the individuals performance measurements with a priori performance information using a Bayesian framework, while retaining the strategy of transforming the nonlinear optimization problem of finding the optimal estimates of the two-process model parameters into a series of linear optimization problems. Second, by taking advantage of the linear representation of the two-process model, this new method enables the analytical computation of statistically based measures of reliability for the model predictions in the form of prediction intervals. Two distinct data sets were used to evaluate the proposed method. Results using simulated data with superimposed white Gaussian noise showed that the new method yielded 50% to 90% improvement in parameter-estimate accuracy over the previous method. Moreover, the accuracy of the analytically computed prediction intervals was validated through Monte Carlo simulations. Results for subjects representing three sleep-loss phenotypes who participated in a laboratory study (82 h of total sleep loss) indicated that the proposed method yielded individualized predictions that were up to 43% more accurate than group-average prediction models and, on average, 10% more accurate than individualized predictions based on our previous method.
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Universal glucose models for predicting subcutaneous glucose concentration in humans.
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2009
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This paper tests the hypothesis that a "universal," data-driven model can be developed based on glucose data from one diabetic subject, and subsequently applied to predict subcutaneous glucose concentrations of other subjects, even of those with different types of diabetes. We employed three separate studies, each utilizing a different continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device, to verify the models universality. Two out of the three studies involved subjects with type 1 diabetes and the other one with type 2 diabetes. We first filtered the subcutaneous glucose concentration data by imposing constraints on their rate of change. Then, using the filtered data, we developed data-driven autoregressive models of order 30, and used them to make short-term, 30-min-ahead glucose-concentration predictions. We used same-subject model predictions as a reference for comparisons against cross-subject and cross-study model predictions, which were evaluated using the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) and Clarke error grid analysis (EGA). We found that, for each studied subject, the average cross-subject and cross-study RMSEs of the predictions were small and indistinguishable from those obtained with the same-subject models. These observations were corroborated by EGA, where better than 99.0% of the paired sensor-predicted glucose concentrations lay in the clinically acceptable zone A. In addition, the predictive capability of the models was found not to be affected by diabetes type, subject age, CGM device, and interindividual differences. We conclude that it is feasible to develop universal glucose models that allow for clinical use of predictive algorithms and CGM devices for proactive therapy of diabetic patients.
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Can we improve the clinical utility of respiratory rate as a monitored vital sign?
Shock
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2009
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Respiratory rate (RR) is a basic vital sign, measured and monitored throughout a wide spectrum of health care settings, although RR is historically difficult to measure in a reliable fashion. We explore an automated method that computes RR only during intervals of clean, regular, and consistent respiration and investigate its diagnostic use in a retrospective analysis of prehospital trauma casualties. At least 5 s of basic vital signs, including heart rate, RR, and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, were continuously collected from 326 spontaneously breathing trauma casualties during helicopter transport to a level I trauma center. "Reliable" RR data were identified retrospectively using automated algorithms. The diagnostic performances of reliable versus standard RR were evaluated by calculation of the receiver operating characteristic curves using the maximum-likelihood method and comparison of the summary areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). Respiratory rate shows significant data-reliability differences. For identifying prehospital casualties who subsequently receive a respiratory intervention (hospital intubation or tube thoracotomy), standard RR yields an AUC of 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.69), whereas reliable RR yields an AUC of 0.67 (0.57-0.77), P < 0.05. For identifying casualties subsequently diagnosed with a major hemorrhagic injury and requiring blood transfusion, standard RR yields an AUC of 0.60 (0.49-0.70), whereas reliable RR yields 0.77 (0.67-0.85), P < 0.001. Reliable RR, as determined by an automated algorithm, is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of respiratory pathology and major hemorrhage in a trauma population. It may be a useful input to a wide variety of clinical scores and automated decision-support algorithms.
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Mathematical modeling research to support the development of automated insulin-delivery systems.
J Diabetes Sci Technol
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2009
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The world leaders in glycemia modeling convened during the Eighth Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting in Bethesda, Maryland, on 14 November 2008, to discuss the current practices in mathematical modeling and make recommendations for its use in developing automated insulin-delivery systems. This report summarizes the collective views of the 25 participating experts in addressing the following four topics: current practices in modeling efforts for closed-loop control; framework for exchange of information and collaboration among research centers; major barriers for the development of accurate models; and key tasks for developing algorithms to build closed-loop control systems. Among the participants, the following main conclusions and recommendations were widely supported: 1. Physiologic variance represents the single largest technical challenge to creating accurate simulation models. 2. A Web site describing different models and the data supporting them should be made publically available, with funding agencies and journals requiring investigators to provide open access to both models and data. 3. Existing simulation models should be compared and contrasted, using the same evaluation and validation criteria, to better assess the state of the art, understand any inherent limitations in the models, and identify gaps in data and/or model capability.
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Exploration of prehospital vital sign trends for the prediction of trauma outcomes.
Prehosp Emerg Care
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2009
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We explored whether there are diagnostically useful temporal trends in prehospital vital signs of trauma patients.
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A novel scoring approach for protein co-purification data reveals high interaction specificity.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2009
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Large-scale protein interaction networks (PINs) have typically been discerned using affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP/MS) and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) techniques. It is generally recognized that Y2H screens detect direct binary interactions while the AP/MS method captures co-complex associations; however, the latter technique is known to yield prevalent false positives arising from a number of effects, including abundance. We describe a novel approach to compute the propensity for two proteins to co-purify in an AP/MS data set, thereby allowing us to assess the detected level of interaction specificity by analyzing the corresponding distribution of interaction scores. We find that two recent AP/MS data sets of yeast contain enrichments of specific, or high-scoring, associations as compared to commensurate random profiles, and that curated, direct physical interactions in two prominent data bases have consistently high scores. Our scored interaction data sets are generally more comprehensive than those of previous studies when compared against four diverse, high-quality reference sets. Furthermore, we find that our scored data sets are more enriched with curated, direct physical associations than Y2H sets. A high-confidence protein interaction network (PIN) derived from the AP/MS data is revealed to be highly modular, and we show that this topology is not the result of misrepresenting indirect associations as direct interactions. In fact, we propose that the modularity in Y2H data sets may be underrepresented, as they contain indirect associations that are significantly enriched with false negatives. The AP/MS PIN is also found to contain significant assortative mixing; however, in line with a previous study we confirm that Y2H interaction data show weak disassortativeness, thus revealing more clearly the distinctive natures of the interaction detection methods. We expect that our scored yeast data sets are ideal for further biological discovery and that our scoring system will prove useful for other AP/MS data sets.
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A systems biology framework for modeling metabolic enzyme inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
BMC Syst Biol
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2009
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Because metabolism is fundamental in sustaining microbial life, drugs that target pathogen-specific metabolic enzymes and pathways can be very effective. In particular, the metabolic challenges faced by intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, residing in the infected host provide novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention.
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PSPP: a protein structure prediction pipeline for computing clusters.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2009
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Protein structures are critical for understanding the mechanisms of biological systems and, subsequently, for drug and vaccine design. Unfortunately, protein sequence data exceed structural data by a factor of more than 200 to 1. This gap can be partially filled by using computational protein structure prediction. While structure prediction Web servers are a notable option, they often restrict the number of sequence queries and/or provide a limited set of prediction methodologies. Therefore, we present a standalone protein structure prediction software package suitable for high-throughput structural genomic applications that performs all three classes of prediction methodologies: comparative modeling, fold recognition, and ab initio. This software can be deployed on a users own high-performance computing cluster.
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Predicting subcutaneous glucose concentration in humans: data-driven glucose modeling.
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2009
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The combination of predictive data-driven models with frequent glucose measurements may provide for an early warning of impending glucose excursions and proactive regulatory interventions for diabetes patients. However, from a modeling perspective, before the benefits of such a strategy can be attained, we must first be able to quantitatively characterize the behavior of the model coefficients as well as the model predictions as a function of prediction horizon. We need to determine if the model coefficients reflect viable physiologic dependencies of the individual glycemic measurements and whether the model is stable with respect to small changes in noise levels, leading to accurate near-future predictions with negligible time lag. We assessed the behavior of linear autoregressive data-driven models developed under three possible modeling scenarios, using continuous glucose measurements of nine subjects collected on a minute-by-minute basis for approximately 5 days. Simulation results indicated that stable and accurate models for near-future glycemic predictions (< 60 min) with clinically acceptable time lags are attained only when the raw glucose measurements are smoothed and the model coefficients are regularized. This study provides a starting point for further needed investigations before real-time deployment can be considered.
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Influence of protein abundance on high-throughput protein-protein interaction detection.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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Experimental protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are increasingly being exploited in diverse ways for biological discovery. Accordingly, it is vital to discern their underlying natures by identifying and classifying the various types of deterministic (specific) and probabilistic (nonspecific) interactions detected. To this end, we have analyzed PPI networks determined using a range of high-throughput experimental techniques with the aim of systematically quantifying any biases that arise from the varying cellular abundances of the proteins. We confirm that PPI networks determined using affinity purification methods for yeast and Escherichia coli incorporate a correlation between protein degree, or number of interactions, and cellular abundance. The observed correlations are small but statistically significant and occur in both unprocessed (raw) and processed (high-confidence) data sets. In contrast, the yeast two-hybrid system yields networks that contain no such relationship. While previously commented based on mRNA abundance, our more extensive analysis based on protein abundance confirms a systematic difference between PPI networks determined from the two technologies. We additionally demonstrate that the centrality-lethality rule, which implies that higher-degree proteins are more likely to be essential, may be misleading, as protein abundance measurements identify essential proteins to be more prevalent than nonessential proteins. In fact, we generally find that when there is a degree/abundance correlation, the degree distributions of nonessential and essential proteins are also disparate. Conversely, when there is no degree/abundance correlation, the degree distributions of nonessential and essential proteins are not different. However, we show that essentiality manifests itself as a biological property in all of the yeast PPI networks investigated here via enrichments of interactions between essential proteins. These findings provide valuable insights into the underlying natures of the various high-throughput technologies utilized to detect PPIs and should lead to more effective strategies for the inference and analysis of high-quality PPI data sets.
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Genome-wide enzyme annotation with precision control: catalytic families (CatFam) databases.
Proteins
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2009
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In this article, we present a new method termed CatFam (Catalytic Families) to automatically infer the functions of catalytic proteins, which account for 20-40% of all proteins in living organisms and play a critical role in a variety of biological processes. CatFam is a sequence-based method that generates sequence profiles to represent and infer protein catalytic functions. CatFam generates profiles through a stepwise procedure that carefully controls profile quality and employs nonenzymes as negative samples to establish profile-specific thresholds associated with a predefined nominal false-positive rate (FPR) of predictions. The adjustable FPR allows for fine precision control of each profile and enables the generation of profile databases that meet different needs: function annotation with high precision and hypothesis generation with moderate precision but better recall. Multiple tests of CatFam databases (generated with distinct nominal FPRs) against enzyme and nonenzyme datasets show that the methods predictions have consistently high precision and recall. For example, a 1% FPR database predicts protein catalytic functions for a dataset of enzymes and nonenzymes with 98.6% precision and 95.0% recall. Comparisons of CatFam databases against other established profile-based methods for the functional annotation of 13 bacterial genomes indicate that CatFam consistently achieves higher precision and (in most cases) higher recall, and that (on average) CatFam provides 21.9% additional catalytic functions not inferred by the other similarly reliable methods. These results strongly suggest that the proposed method provides a valuable contribution to the automated prediction of protein catalytic functions. The CatFam databases and the database search program are freely available at http://www.bhsai.org/downloads/catfam.tar.gz.
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Individualized performance prediction during total sleep deprivation: accounting for trait vulnerability to sleep loss.
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
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Individual differences in vulnerability to sleep loss can be considerable, and thus, recent efforts have focused on developing individualized models for predicting the effects of sleep loss on performance. Individualized models constructed using a Bayesian formulation, which combines an individuals available performance data with a priori performance predictions from a group-average model, typically need at least 40 h of individual data before showing significant improvement over the group-average model predictions. Here, we improve upon the basic Bayesian formulation for developing individualized models by observing that individuals may be classified into three sleep-loss phenotypes: resilient, average, and vulnerable. For each phenotype, we developed a phenotype-specific group-average model and used these models to identify each individuals phenotype. We then used the phenotype-specific models within the Bayesian formulation to make individualized predictions. Results on psychomotor vigilance test data from 48 individuals indicated that, on average, ?85% of individual phenotypes were accurately identified within 30 h of wakefulness. The percentage improvement of the proposed approach in 10-h-ahead predictions was 16% for resilient subjects and 6% for vulnerable subjects. The trade-off for these improvements was a slight decrease in prediction accuracy for average subjects.
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Use of a food and drug administration-approved type 1 diabetes mellitus simulator to evaluate and optimize a proportional-integral-derivative controller.
J Diabetes Sci Technol
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Clinical studies have shown that the Medtronic proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control with insulin feedback (IFB) provides stable 24 h glucose control, but with high postprandial glucose. We coupled this algorithm to a Food and Drug Administration-approved type 1 diabetes mellitus simulator to determine whether a proportional-derivative controller with preprogrammed basal rates (PDBASAL) would have better performance.
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Modeling phenotypic metabolic adaptations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv under hypoxia.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
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The ability to adapt to different conditions is key for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), to successfully infect human hosts. Adaptations allow the organism to evade the host immune responses during acute infections and persist for an extended period of time during the latent infectious stage. In latently infected individuals, estimated to include one-third of the human population, the organism exists in a variety of metabolic states, which impedes the development of a simple strategy for controlling or eradicating this disease. Direct knowledge of the metabolic states of M. tuberculosis in patients would aid in the management of the disease as well as in forming the basis for developing new drugs and designing more efficacious drug cocktails. Here, we propose an in silico approach to create state-specific models based on readily available gene expression data. The coupling of differential gene expression data with a metabolic network model allowed us to characterize the metabolic adaptations of M. tuberculosis H37Rv to hypoxia. Given the microarray data for the alterations in gene expression, our model predicted reduced oxygen uptake, ATP production changes, and a global change from an oxidative to a reductive tricarboxylic acid (TCA) program. Alterations in the biomass composition indicated an increase in the cell wall metabolites required for cell-wall growth, as well as heightened accumulation of triacylglycerol in preparation for a low-nutrient, low metabolic activity life style. In contrast, the gene expression program in the deletion mutant of dosR, which encodes the immediate hypoxic response regulator, failed to adapt to low-oxygen stress. Our predictions were compatible with recent experimental observations of M. tuberculosis activity under hypoxic and anaerobic conditions. Importantly, alterations in the flow and accumulation of a particular metabolite were not necessarily directly linked to differential gene expression of the enzymes catalyzing the related metabolic reactions.
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A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol concentration.
Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.
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Both circadian rhythmicity and sleep play significant roles in the regulation of plasma cortisol concentration by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Numerous studies have found links between sleep and changes in cortisol concentration, but the implications of these results have remained largely qualitative. In this article, we present a quantitative phenomenological model to describe the effects of different sleep durations on cortisol concentration. We constructed the proposed model by incorporating the circadian and sleep allostatic effects on cortisol concentration, the pulsatile nature of cortisol secretion, and cortisols negative autoregulation of its own production and validated its performance on three study groups that experienced four distinct sleep durations. The model captured many disparate effects of sleep on cortisol dynamics, such as the inhibition of cortisol secretion after the wake-to-sleep transition and the rapid rise of cortisol concentration before morning awakening. Notably, the model reconciled the seemingly contradictory findings between studies that report an increase in cortisol concentration following total sleep deprivation and studies that report no change in concentration. This work provides a biomathematical approach to combine the results on the effects of sleep on cortisol concentration into a unified framework and predict the impact of varying sleep durations on the cortisol profile.
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Quantitative predictions of binding free energy changes in drug-resistant influenza neuraminidase.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
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Quantitatively predicting changes in drug sensitivity associated with residue mutations is a major challenge in structural biology. By expanding the limits of free energy calculations, we successfully identified mutations in influenza neuraminidase (NA) that confer drug resistance to two antiviral drugs, zanamivir and oseltamivir. We augmented molecular dynamics (MD) with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange and calculated binding free energy changes for H274Y, N294S, and Y252H mutants. Based on experimental data, our calculations achieved high accuracy and precision compared with results from established computational methods. Analysis of 15 micros of aggregated MD trajectories provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying drug resistance that are at odds with current interpretations of the crystallographic data. Contrary to the notion that resistance is caused by mutant-induced changes in hydrophobicity of the binding pocket, our simulations showed that drug resistance mutations in NA led to subtle rearrangements in the protein structure and its dynamics that together alter the active-site electrostatic environment and modulate inhibitor binding. Importantly, different mutations confer resistance through different conformational changes, suggesting that a generalized mechanism for NA drug resistance is unlikely.
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Therapeutic correction of thrombin generation in dilution-induced coagulopathy: computational analysis based on a data set of healthy subjects.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg
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Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs), which contain different coagulation proteins, are attractive alternatives to the standard methods to treat dilution-induced (and, generally, traumatic) coagulopathy. We investigated the ability of a novel PCC composition to restore normal thrombin generation in diluted blood. The performance of the proposed PCC composition (coagulation factors [F] II, IX, and X and the anticoagulant antithrombin), designated PCC-AT, was compared with that of FVIIa and PCC-FVII, which is the PCC composition containing FII, FVII, FIX, and FX (main components of most PCCs).
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A quantitative quasispecies theory-based model of virus escape mutation under immune selection.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Viral infections involve a complex interplay of the immune response and escape mutation of the virus quasispecies inside a single host. Although fundamental aspects of such a balance of mutation and selection pressure have been established by the quasispecies theory decades ago, its implications have largely remained qualitative. Here, we present a quantitative approach to model the virus evolution under cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response. The virus quasispecies dynamics are explicitly represented by mutations in the combined sequence space of a set of epitopes within the viral genome. We stochastically simulated the growth of a viral population originating from a single wild-type founder virus and its recognition and clearance by the immune response, as well as the expansion of its genetic diversity. Applied to the immune escape of a simian immunodeficiency virus epitope, model predictions were quantitatively comparable to the experimental data. Within the model parameter space, we found two qualitatively different regimes of infectious disease pathogenesis, each representing alternative fates of the immune response: It can clear the infection in finite time or eventually be overwhelmed by viral growth and escape mutation. The latter regime exhibits the characteristic disease progression pattern of human immunodeficiency virus, while the former is bounded by maximum mutation rates that can be suppressed by the immune response. Our results demonstrate that, by explicitly representing epitope mutations and thus providing a genotype-phenotype map, the quasispecies theory can form the basis of a detailed sequence-specific model of real-world viral pathogens evolving under immune selection.
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Are standard diagnostic test characteristics sufficient for the assessment of continual patient monitoring?
Med Decis Making
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For diagnostic processes involving continual measurements from a single patient, conventional test characteristics, such as sensitivity and specificity, do not consider decision consistency, which might be a distinct, clinically relevant test characteristic.
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QuartetS-DB: a large-scale orthology database for prokaryotes and eukaryotes inferred by evolutionary evidence.
BMC Bioinformatics
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The concept of orthology is key to decoding evolutionary relationships among genes across different species using comparative genomics. QuartetS is a recently reported algorithm for large-scale orthology detection. Based on the well-established evolutionary principle that gene duplication events discriminate paralogous from orthologous genes, QuartetS has been shown to improve orthology detection accuracy while maintaining computational efficiency.
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Thermodynamic basis for the emergence of genomes during prebiotic evolution.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
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The RNA world hypothesis views modern organisms as descendants of RNA molecules. The earliest RNA molecules must have been random sequences, from which the first genomes that coded for polymerase ribozymes emerged. The quasispecies theory by Eigen predicts the existence of an error threshold limiting genomic stability during such transitions, but does not address the spontaneity of changes. Following a recent theoretical approach, we applied the quasispecies theory combined with kinetic/thermodynamic descriptions of RNA replication to analyze the collective behavior of RNA replicators based on known experimental kinetics data. We find that, with increasing fidelity (relative rate of base-extension for Watson-Crick versus mismatched base pairs), replications without enzymes, with ribozymes, and with protein-based polymerases are above, near, and below a critical point, respectively. The prebiotic evolution therefore must have crossed this critical region. Over large regions of the phase diagram, fitness increases with increasing fidelity, biasing random drifts in sequence space toward crystallization. This region encloses the experimental nonenzymatic fidelity value, favoring evolutions toward polymerase sequences with ever higher fidelity, despite error rates above the error catastrophe threshold. Our work shows that experimentally characterized kinetics and thermodynamics of RNA replication allow us to determine the physicochemical conditions required for the spontaneous crystallization of biological information. Our findings also suggest that among many potential oligomers capable of templated replication, RNAs may have evolved to form prebiotic genomes due to the value of their nonenzymatic fidelity.
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A new strategy to reduce allelic bias in RNA-Seq readmapping.
Nucleic Acids Res.
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Accurate estimation of expression levels from RNA-Seq data entails precise mapping of the sequence reads to a reference genome. Because the standard reference genome contains only one allele at any given locus, reads overlapping polymorphic loci that carry a non-reference allele are at least one mismatch away from the reference and, hence, are less likely to be mapped. This bias in read mapping leads to inaccurate estimates of allele-specific expression (ASE). To address this read-mapping bias, we propose the construction of an enhanced reference genome that includes the alternative alleles at known polymorphic loci. We show that mapping to this enhanced reference reduced the read-mapping biases, leading to more reliable estimates of ASE. Experiments on simulated data show that the proposed strategy reduced the number of loci with mapping bias by ? 63% when compared with a previous approach that relies on masking the polymorphic loci and by ? 18% when compared with the standard approach that uses an unaltered reference. When we applied our strategy to actual RNA-Seq data, we found that it mapped up to 15% more reads than the previous approaches and identified many seemingly incorrect inferences made by them.
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Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions.
BMC Bioinformatics
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As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83%) of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once.
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A new metric for quantifying performance impairment on the psychomotor vigilance test.
J Sleep Res
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We have developed a new psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) metric for quantifying the effects of sleep loss on performance impairment. The new metric quantifies performance impairment by estimating the probability density of response times (RTs) in a PVT session, and then considering deviations of the density relative to that of a baseline-session density. Results from a controlled laboratory study involving 12 healthy adults subjected to 85 h of extended wakefulness, followed by 12 h of recovery sleep, revealed that the group performance variability based on the new metric remained relatively uniform throughout wakefulness. In contrast, the variability of PVT lapses, mean RT, median RT and (to a lesser extent) mean speed showed strong time-of-day effects, with the PVT lapse variability changing with time of day depending on the selected threshold. Our analysis suggests that the new metric captures more effectively the homeostatic and circadian process underlying sleep regulation than the other metrics, both directly in terms of larger effect sizes (4-61% larger) and indirectly through improved fits to the two-process model (9-67% larger coefficient of determination). Although the trend of the mean speed results followed those of the new metric, we found that mean speed yields significantly smaller (?50%) intersubject performance variance than the other metrics. Based on these findings, and that the new metric considers performance changes based on the entire set of responses relative to a baseline, we conclude that it provides a number of potential advantages over the traditional PVT metrics.
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Computational analysis of intersubject variability and thrombin generation in dilutional coagulopathy.
Transfusion
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Blood dilution is a frequent complication of massive transfusion during trauma and surgery. This article investigates the quantitative effects of blood plasma dilution on thrombin generation in the context of intersubject variability.
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The association between vital signs and major hemorrhagic injury is significantly improved after controlling for sources of measurement variability.
J Crit Care
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Measurement error and transient variability affect vital signs. These issues are inconsistently considered in published reports and clinical practice. We investigated the association between major hemorrhagic injury and vital signs, successively applying analytic techniques that excluded unreliable measurements, reduced transient variation, and then controlled for ambiguity in individual vital signs through multivariate analysis.
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Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury.
J. Neurotrauma
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We hypothesized that vital signs could be used to improve the association between a trauma patients prehospital Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score and his or her clinical condition. Previously, abnormally low and high blood pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384 adult prehospital trauma patients. Vital-sign data were electronically archived and analyzed. We examined the relative risk of severe head abbreviated injury scale (AIS) 5-6 as a function of the GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR). We created multivariate logistic regression models and, using DeLongs test, compared their area under receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC AUCs) for three outcomes: head AIS 5-6, all-cause mortality, and either head AIS 5-6 or neurosurgical procedure. We found significant bimodal relationships between head AIS 5-6 versus SBP and HR, but not RR. When the GCS < 15, ROC AUCs were significantly higher for a multivariate regression model (GCS, SBP, and HR) versus GCS alone. In particular, patients with abnormalities in all parameters (GCS, SBP, and HR) were significantly more likely to have high-mortality TBI versus those with abnormalities in GCS alone. This could be useful for mobilizing resources, e.g., neurosurgeons and operating rooms at the receiving hospital, and might enable new prehospital management protocols where therapies are selected based on TBI mortality risk.
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PC-PVT: A platform for psychomotor vigilance task testing, analysis, and prediction.
Behav Res Methods
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Using a personal computer (PC) for simple visual reaction time testing is advantageous because of the relatively low hardware cost, user familiarity, and the relative ease of software development for specific neurobehavioral testing protocols. However, general-purpose computers are not designed with the millisecond-level accuracy of operation required for such applications. Software that does not control for the various sources of delay may return reaction time values that are substantially different from the true reaction times. We have developed and characterized a freely available system for PC-based simple visual reaction time testing that is analogous to the widely used psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). In addition, we have integrated individualized prediction algorithms for near-real-time neurobehavioral performance prediction. We characterized the precision and accuracy with which the system as a whole measures reaction times on a wide range of computer hardware configurations, comparing its performance with that of the "gold standard" PVT-192 device. We showed that the system is capable of measuring reaction times with an average delay of less than 10 ms, a margin of error that is comparable to that of the gold standard. The most critical aspect of hardware selection is the type of mouse used for response detection, with gaming mice showing a significant advantage over standard ones. The software is free to download from http://bhsai.org/downloads/pc-pvt/ .
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.