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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Untangling dopamine-adenosine receptor assembly in experimental parkinsonism.
Dis Model Mech
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2014
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Parkinson's disease (PD) is a dopaminergic-related pathology in which basal ganglia functioning are altered. It has been postulated that a direct receptor-receptor - i.e. dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) - interaction may be finely regulating this brain area. Accordingly, elucidating whether the pathology prompts changes on these structures could grant valuable information for the design of new PD therapies. Here, we first resolved a long-standing question concerning D2R-A2AR assembly in native tissue. Thus, by means of different complementary experimental approaches (i.e. immunoelectron microscopy, proximity ligation assay and TR-FRET), we unambiguously identified native D2R/A2AR oligomers in rat striatum. Subsequently, we determined that under pathological conditions (i.e. in a rat PD model) D2R-A2AR interaction was impaired. Collectively, these results provide definitive evidence for a native D2R/A2AR oligomer alteration in experimental parkinsonism, thus conferring the rationale for appropriate oligomer-based PD treatments.
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Uncovering Caffeine's Adenosine A2A Receptor Inverse Agonism in Experimental Parkinsonism.
ACS Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2014
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Caffeine, the most consumed psychoactive substance worldwide, may have beneficial effects on Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. The mechanism by which caffeine contributes to its antiparkinsonian effects by acting as either an adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) neutral antagonist or an inverse agonist is unresolved. Here we show that caffeine is an A2AR inverse agonist in cell-based functional studies and in experimental parkinsonism. Thus, we observed that caffeine triggers a distinct mode, opposite to A2AR agonist, of the receptor's activation switch leading to suppression of its spontaneous activity. These inverse agonist-related effects were also determined in the striatum of a mouse model of PD, correlating well with increased caffeine-mediated motor effects. Overall, caffeine A2AR inverse agonism may be behind some of the well-known physiological effects of this substance both in health and disease. This information might have a critical mechanistic impact for PD pharmacotherapeutic design.
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Photomodulation of g protein-coupled adenosine receptors by a novel light-switchable ligand.
Bioconjug. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2014
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The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N(6) substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities.
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Striatal adenosine A2A receptor expression is controlled by S-adenosyl-L-methionine-mediated methylation.
Purinergic Signal.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor enriched in the striatum for which an increased expression has been demonstrated in certain neurological diseases. Interestingly, previous in vitro studies demonstrated that A2AR expression levels are reduced after treatment with S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), a methyl donor molecule involved in the methylation of important biological structures such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. However, the in vivo effects of SAM treatment on A2AR expression are still obscure. Here, we demonstrated that 2 weeks of SAM treatment produced a significant reduction in the rat striatal A2AR messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein content as well as A2AR-mediated signaling. Furthermore, when the content of 5-methylcytosine levels in the 5'UTR region of ADORA2A was analyzed, this was significantly increased in the striatum of SAM-treated animals; thus, an unambiguous correlation between SAM-mediated methylation and striatal A2AR expression could be established. Overall, we concluded that striatal A2AR functionality can be controlled by SAM treatment, an issue that might be relevant for the management of these neurological conditions that course with increased A2AR expression.
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Ras-association domain of sorting Nexin 27 is critical for regulating expression of GIRK potassium channels.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability. Sorting nexin 27b (SNX27b), which reduces surface expression of GIRK channels through a PDZ domain interaction, contains a putative Ras-association (RA) domain with unknown function. Deleting the RA domain in SNX27b (SNX27b-?RA) prevents the down-regulation of GIRK2c/GIRK3 channels. Similarly, a point mutation (K305A) in the RA domain disrupts regulation of GIRK2c/GIRK3 channels and reduces H-Ras binding in vitro. Finally, the dominant-negative H-Ras (S17N) occludes the SNX27b-dependent decrease in surface expression of GIRK2c/GIRK3 channels. Thus, the presence of a functional RA domain and the interaction with Ras-like G proteins comprise a novel mechanism for modulating SNX27b control of GIRK channel surface expression and cellular excitability.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.