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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quality improvement skills for pediatric residents: from lecture to implementation and sustainability.
Acad Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2014
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Quality improvement (QI) skills are relevant to efforts to improve the health care system. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements call for resident participation in local and institutional QI efforts, and the move to outcomes-based accreditation is resulting in greater focus on the resulting learning and clinical outcomes. Many programs have enhanced practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems based practice (SBP) curricula, although efforts to actively involve residents in QI activities appear to be lagging. Using information from the extensive experience of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, we offer recommendations for how to create meaningful QI experiences for residents meet ACGME requirements and the expectations of the Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) process. Resident involvement in QI requires a multipronged approach that overcomes barriers and limitations that have frustrated earlier efforts to move this education from lectures to immersion experiences at the bedside and in the clinic. We present 5 dimensions of effective programs that facilitate active resident participation in improvement work and enhance their QI skills: 1) providing curricula and education models that ground residents in QI principles; 2) ensuring faculty development to prepare physicians for their role in teaching QI and demonstrating it in day-to-day practice; 3) ensuring all residents receive meaningful QI education and practical exposure to improvement projects; 4) overcoming time and other constraints to allow residents to apply their newly developed QI skills; and 5) assessing the effect of exposure to QI on resident competence and project outcomes.
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Putting the pediatrics milestones into practice: a consensus roadmap and resource analysis.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2014
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The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has partnered with member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties to initiate the next steps in advancing competency-based assessment in residency programs. This initiative, known as the Milestone Project, is a paradigm shift from traditional assessment efforts and requires all pediatrics residency programs to report individual resident progression along a series of 4 to 5 developmental levels of performance, or milestones, for individual competencies every 6 months beginning in June 2014. The effort required to successfully make this shift is tremendous given the number of training programs, training institutions, and trainees. However, it holds great promise for achieving training outcomes that align with patient needs; developing a valid, reliable, and meaningful way to track residents' development; and providing trainees with a roadmap for learning. Recognizing the resources needed to implement this new system, the authors, all residency program leaders, provide their consensus view of the components necessary for implementing and sustaining this effort, including resource estimates for completing this work. The authors have identified 4 domains: (1) Program Review and Development of Stakeholders and Participants, (2) Assessment Methods and Validation, (3) Data and Assessment System Development, and (4) Summative Assessment and Feedback. This work can serve as a starting point and framework for collaboration with program, department, and institutional leaders to identify and garner necessary resources and plan for local and national efforts that will ensure successful transition to milestones-based assessment.
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Characteristics of children diagnosed as having coagulopathies following posttonsillectomy bleeding.
Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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To determine the prevalence of coagulopathy among children presenting with posttonsillectomy bleeding (PTB) and describe risk factors that could indicate the presence of occult coagulopathy.
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Pediatric emergency medicine residency experience: requirements versus reality.
J Grad Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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An important expectation of pediatric education is assessing, resuscitating, and stabilizing ill or injured children.
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Procedural readiness of pediatric interns: defining novice performance through simulation.
J Grad Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2010
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Pediatric lumbar puncture (LP) is a common invasive procedure performed by physicians in training. The Association of American Medical Colleges and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recognize simulation as a tool for deliberate practice and standardized assessment of procedural performance.
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Failure to thrive: pediatric residents weigh in on feasibility trial of the proposed 2008 institute of medicine work hour restrictions.
J Grad Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2009
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In December 2008 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a report recommending limits on resident hours that are considerably more restrictive than the current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty hour standards.
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One possible future for resident hours: interns perspective on a one-month trial of the institute of medicine recommended duty hour limits.
J Grad Med Educ
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2009
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In December 2008, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the report of a consensus committee recommending added limits on resident duty hours.
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Decreasing Adverse Events through Night Talks: An Interdisciplinary, Hospital-Based Quality Improvement Project.
Perm J
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2009
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Background: The majority of medical adverse events are secondary to errors in communication. The Joint Commission (known until 2007 as the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations) reports that 70% of sentinel events are the result of communication failures. Review of nonperioperative adverse events at Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center in 2007 found similar statistics: 57% were related to failure to recognize abnormal vital signs and to communicate or address parents or nurses concerns.Objective: To increase by 80% the number of days between near misses in pediatric neurosurgical patients because of failure to address abnormal vital signs or parents or nurses concerns during the night shift.Materials and Methods: Baseline data on near misses from the previous night were collected with the use of a written questionnaire completed the next morning by the interns, patient-care facilitators or charge nurse, and attending physicians. Laminated cards with three standardized questions were created to guide a late-evening review of patients status by residents, attending physicians, and nurses: the Night Talks discussion. After initiation of Night Talks, data were collected for issues addressed by Night Talks as well as for preventable adverse events.Main Outcome Measure: Number of days between near misses.Results: During a two-month period before the introduction of Night Talks, there was an average of 3.8 days between near misses on neurosurgery patients. After the initiation of Night Talks, days between near misses due to the failure to address abnormal vital signs or parents or nurses concerns increased to 201 days, a 5360% change.Conclusion: Instituting standardized Night Talks substantially reduced near misses in neurosurgical patients at our institution at night.
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Better rested, but more stressed? Evidence of the effects of resident work hour restrictions.
Acad Pediatr
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After the publication of the 2009 Institute of Medicine report addressing resident sleep, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented new work hour restrictions in 2011. We explored the effects of a resident schedule compliant with 2011 limits on resident sleep, fatigue, education, and aspects of professionalism.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.