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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Homozygosity for HLA Group 2 Alleles Predicts Treatment Failure with Interferon-? and Ribavirin in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection.
J. Interferon Cytokine Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2014
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Host genetic factors influence treatment responses to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We retrospectively investigated associations between host genetic markers and treatment-induced virologic responses to dual therapy with interferon-? and ribavirin in chronically infected HCV genotype 1 (g1)- and genotype 3 (g3)-infected individuals. A total of 171 patients (89 HCV g1 and 82 HCV g3 infected) were investigated for genetic markers influencing treatment-induced sustained virologic response (SVR). Overall, SVR was observed for 46/89 (52%) HCV g1- and 57/82 (70%) HCV g3-infected patients. Of the 4 interleukin 28B (IL28B) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs12979860 was the host genetic marker most significantly associated with failure to achieve an SVR in HCV g1-infected individuals [P=3.83×10(-4); odds ratio (OR)=5.61; confidence interval (CI)=2.07-15.18] and gave a positive predictive value for treatment failure of 81.3% for minor homozygotes (TT). Using additive (P=3.54×10(-4)) and dominant models (P=3.83×10(-4)), a dosage effect of the T allele was observed, with the dominance term not significant for this SNP. Logistic regression showed an association between HLA-C1/C1 and rapid virologic response in HCV g1 infections with an OR relative to the heterozygote of 10.0 (95% CI: 1.6-62.5, P=0.014). HLA-C2 homozygosity was a significant predictor of nonresponse to treatment in HCV g1-infected individuals (P=0.023).
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Seroepidemiology and phylogenetic characterisation of measles virus in Ireland, 2004-2013.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2014
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Ireland is classified as an area of high measles incidence. A World Health Organisation-European Region strategic plan exists for measles elimination by 2015.
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Underreporting of viral encephalitis and viral meningitis, Ireland, 2005-2008.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2013
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Viral encephalitis (VE) and viral meningitis (VM) have been notifiable infectious diseases under surveillance in the Republic of Ireland since 1981. Laboratories have reported confirmed cases by detection of viral nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid since 2004. To determine the prevalence of these diseases in Ireland during 2005-2008, we analyzed 3 data sources: Hospital In-patient Enquiry data (from hospitalized following patients discharge) accessed through Health Intelligence Ireland, laboratory confirmations from the National Virus Reference Laboratory, and events from the Computerised Infectious Disease Reporting surveillance system. We found that the national surveillance system underestimates the incidence of these diseases in Ireland with a 10-fold higher VE hospitalization rate and 3-fold higher VM hospitalization rate than the reporting rate. Herpesviruses were responsible for most specified VE and enteroviruses for most specified VM from all 3 sources. Recommendations from this study have been implemented to improve the surveillance of these diseases in Ireland.
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Increased levels of PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells in patients post-renal transplant irrespective of chronic high EBV viral load.
Pediatr Transplant
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2013
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Studies have identified solid organ transplant recipients who remain asymptomatic despite maintaining CHL. Factors which determine the CHL state remain poorly understood but are likely to involve immunological control of the viral infection. We monitored expression of PD-1, a marker of T-cell exhaustion and viral persistence, on CD8 T cells in patients who resolved EBV infection as determined by undetectable EBV DNA (REI) and CHL patients. PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells was increased in the first year post-transplant irrespective of EBV outcome, and most CD8 T cells continued to express PD-1 for up to three yr post-transplant. Although all patient groups showed similar frequencies of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells, PD-1 expression on these cells increased in the post-transplant groups compared with the pretransplant patients. Functional studies of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells stimulated with BZLF or LMP2 peptide pools revealed monofunctional IFN-? responses. Our results indicate that PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells post-transplant may result from factors other than antigenic stimulation.
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Association between chromosome 9p21 variants and the ankle-brachial index identified by a meta-analysis of 21 genome-wide association studies.
Joanne M Murabito, Charles C White, Maryam Kavousi, Yan V Sun, Mary F Feitosa, Vijay Nambi, Claudia Lamina, Arne Schillert, Stefan Coassin, Joshua C Bis, Linda Broer, Dana C Crawford, Nora Franceschini, Ruth Frikke-Schmidt, Margot Haun, Suzanne Holewijn, Jennifer E Huffman, Shih-Jen Hwang, Stefan Kiechl, Barbara Kollerits, May E Montasser, Ilja M Nolte, Megan E Rudock, Andrea Senft, Alexander Teumer, Pim van der Harst, Veronique Vitart, Lindsay L Waite, Andrew R Wood, Christina L Wassel, Devin M Absher, Matthew A Allison, Najaf Amin, Alice Arnold, Folkert W Asselbergs, Yurii Aulchenko, Stefania Bandinelli, Maja Barbalic, Mladen Boban, Kristin Brown-Gentry, David J Couper, Michael H Criqui, Abbas Dehghan, Martin den Heijer, Benjamin Dieplinger, Jingzhong Ding, Marcus Dörr, Christine Espinola-Klein, Stephan B Felix, Luigi Ferrucci, Aaron R Folsom, Gustav Fraedrich, Quince Gibson, Robert Goodloe, Grgo Gunjaca, Meinhard Haltmayer, Gerardo Heiss, Albert Hofman, Arne Kieback, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Ivana Kolčić, Iftikhar J Kullo, Stephen B Kritchevsky, Karl J Lackner, Xiaohui Li, Wolfgang Lieb, Kurt Lohman, Christa Meisinger, David Melzer, Emile R Mohler, Ivana Mudnic, Thomas Mueller, Gerjan Navis, Friedrich Oberhollenzer, Jeffrey W Olin, Jeff O'Connell, Christopher J O'Donnell, Walter Palmas, Brenda W Penninx, Astrid Petersmann, Ozren Polašek, Bruce M Psaty, Barbara Rantner, Ken Rice, Fernando Rivadeneira, Jerome I Rotter, Adrie Seldenrijk, Marietta Stadler, Monika Summerer, Toshiko Tanaka, Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, André G Uitterlinden, Wiek H van Gilst, Sita H Vermeulen, Sarah H Wild, Philipp S Wild, Johann Willeit, Tanja Zeller, Tatijana Zemunik, Lina Zgaga, Themistocles L Assimes, Stefan Blankenberg, Eric Boerwinkle, Harry Campbell, John P Cooke, Jacqueline de Graaf, David Herrington, Sharon L R Kardia, Braxton D Mitchell, Anna Murray, Thomas Münzel, Anne B Newman, Ben A Oostra, Igor Rudan, Alan R Shuldiner, Harold Snieder, Cornelia M van Duijn, Uwe Völker, Alan F Wright, H-Erich Wichmann, James F Wilson, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Yongmei Liu, Caroline Hayward, Ingrid B Borecki, Andreas Ziegler, Kari E North, L Adrienne Cupples, Florian Kronenberg.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2011
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Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.
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Surveillance of Epstein-Barr virus loads in adult liver transplantation: associations with age, sex, posttransplant times, and transplant indications.
Liver Transpl.
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2011
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Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening complication after adult orthotopic liver transplantation (AOLT). Besides EBV and immunosuppression, relatively little is known about the pretransplant clinical parameters associated with the risk of PTLD, and the benefit of using EBV surveillance to predict EBV-associated disease in AOLT patients is uncertain. The aims of this single-center study were to monitor EBV viral loads (VLs) in AOLT patients and to investigate any associations with age, sex, cytomegalovirus (CMV) serostatus, posttransplant times, and indications for transplantation. 1275 blood samples that were collected from 197 AOLT patients 1 day to more than 15 years after transplantation were investigated with quantitative polymerase chain reaction for EBV and CMV DNA. Seventy-two percent of the patients had EBV DNAemia less than 100 days after transplantation without clinical manifestations. No association was observed between the EBV copy numbers and the time since transplantation. EBV DNAemia was weakly associated with male sex but was not associated with age, CMV serostatus, or indications for AOLT. The highest EBV VL levels were observed in patients who presented with congenital liver diseases, whereas patients with viral hepatitis maintained high EBV VLs after transplantation. None of the patients developed PTLD during the study period; however, 3 patients presented with EBV-associated diseases. In conclusion, EBV DNAemia is common in AOLT patients, and routine EBV surveillance has limited value for predicting EBV-associated morbidity or mortality.
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Deaths associated with human adenovirus-14p1 infections, Europe, 2009-2010.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2011
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Human adenovirus (HAdV) serotype 14 is rarely identified. However, an emerging variant, termed HAdV-14p1, recently has been described in the United States in association with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease with high rates of illness and death. We retrospectively analyzed specimens confirmed positive for HAdV by immunofluorescence, virus culture, or real-time PCR during July 1, 2009-July 31, 2010, and describe 9 cases of HAdV-14p1 infection with characteristic mutations in the fiber and E1A genes that are phylogenetically indistinguishable from the viruses previously detected in the United States. Three patients died; 2 were immunocompromised, and 1 was an immunocompetent adult. We propose that surveillance should be increased for HAdV-14p1 and recommend that this virus be considered in the differential diagnosis of sudden-onset acute respiratory disease, particularly fatal infections, for which an etiology is not clear.
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Epstein-barr virus gene expression, human leukocyte antigen alleles and chronic high viral loads in pediatric renal transplant patients.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2011
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Studies have identified solid organ transplant recipients who remain asymptomatic despite maintaining chronic high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viral loads. We examined clinical manifestations, EBV gene expression, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, and specific T-cell responses to EBV infection in pediatric renal transplant patients.
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Prevalence of HIV type 1 antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in Vietnam: a multicenter study.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2011
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The prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs) was determined for a cross-section of individuals (n=8654) in five centers across Vietnam (Hanoi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa, and Can Tho) between 2008 and 2009. Following serological screening for HIV infection, HIV-1 viral load was determined, using an in-house real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Samples with quantifiable viral loads [all either commercial sex workers (CSW) or intravenous drug users (IDU)] underwent DRM analysis. Sequences were obtained for 92 treatment-naive individuals, the majority of whom were infected with HIV-1 CRF01_AE (99%), with one instance of subtype A1 also detected. DRMs were detected in seven treatment-naive individuals (7.6%). The most common DRMs observed were M184V, V75A/M, M41L, and K65R (NRTI) and K103N, G190A, and Y181C (NNRTI). Overall, the data from this first multicenter survey of DRMs in Vietnam indicate that the problem of transmitted drug resistance is of major concern in the highest-risk groups of IDU and CSW.
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Human cytomegalovirus UL144 is associated with viremia and infant development sequelae in congenital infection.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2010
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Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strains may be genotyped based on polymorphisms that exist within the UL144 gene, which is one of 19 viral genes lost in attenuated laboratory strains. In the present study, UL144 genotypes in congenitally infected babies (congenital cytomegalovirus [cCMV]) were determined, and the relationship between the genotype, viral load, cytokine profile, and patient developmental outcome was investigated. All cCMV infections identified during 2006 and 2007 were included (n = 29). A portion of the infants were clinically assessed at birth and at 12 to 18 months postinfection for cCMV clinical sequelae (n = 18/29). The plasma viral load (PVL) was requested for 23/29 patients, and the UL144 genotype was determined (n = 27/29). The cytokine profile in patient plasma or serum was assessed (n = 20/29). UL144 genotypes A, B, and C were detected within the cCMV population at 33.3%, 29.6%, and 25.9%, respectively. UL144 A and C were associated with a high PVL (P < 0.04). Furthermore, a significant association between the developmental outcome and UL144 A and C was observed (P < 0.04). Only patients infected with UL144 B and A/B were described as having a normal clinical outcome. In addition, a significant correlation between interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels and the PVL was observed (P < 0.04); however, there was no association between the genotype and the cytokine profile. The present study determined that the specific detection of UL144 genotypes A and C was indicative of serious cCMV infection and more likely to lead to long-term cCMV-associated clinical manifestations. The inclusion of HCMV UL144 genotyping along with the recommended PVL monitoring following cCMV diagnosis may aid prediction of the clinical outcome.
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Molecular epidemiological evaluation of the recent resurgence in mumps virus infections in Ireland.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2010
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Mumps is a vaccine-preventable disease; however, outbreaks have been reported in a number of countries with childhood immunization programs, particularly among young adults at the tertiary stage of education. We have retrospectively investigated the epidemiological, virological, and serological factors associated with mumps cases identified in Ireland from 2004 to 2009. Genetic analysis of mumps virus strain variability demonstrated that a single genotype, genotype G, was circulating, and it was also detected in cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained from patients with meningitis. We observed that younger individuals were disproportionately affected with neurological sequelae following mumps virus infection, and the average age of patients with mumps virus RNA detected in cerebrospinal fluid was 19.25 years (median, 19 years; range, 14 to 24 years). Our analysis showed a 4-fold rise in mumps cases in 2008-2009 and an increased incidence in infection in those >or=30 years of age. Over a 6-year period (2004 to 2009), a total of 7,805 serum samples were investigated; of this number, 1,813 (23%) were positive for mumps virus-specific IgM. We observed a strong bias for acute mumps virus infection in males compared to females (P < 10(-32)) that was independent of vaccination status.
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First report of sudden death due to myocarditis caused by adenovirus serotype 3.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2009
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Myocarditis is a rare cause of sudden death in childhood. We describe the sudden death of a child from viral myocarditis, which we demonstrate was likely caused by an uncontrolled inflammatory response to a disseminated adenovirus serotype 3 infection originating in the tonsil.
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Development of a real-time RT-PCR for the detection of swine-lineage influenza A (H1N1) virus infections.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2009
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A novel influenza A virus, subtype H1N1 of swine-lineage (H1N1 swl) has transmitted rapidly to many regions of the world with evidence of sustained transmission within some countries. Rapid detection and differentiation from seasonal influenza is essential to instigate appropriate patient and public health management and for disease surveillance.
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Molecular epidemiology of circulating measles virus in Ireland 2002-2007.
J. Med. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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The molecular characterization of measles virus (MeV) is a valuable epidemiological tool to monitor virus transmission and to discriminate between imported and endemic infection. There has been significant immigration into Ireland in recent years and many individuals originate from regions of high measles incidence. Ireland has had a number of outbreaks of MeV which appear attributable to sub-optimal vaccine uptake and possibly imported strains as new genotypes have been identified in recent years. To ascertain any significant changes in circulating measles genotypes we investigated 65 confirmed measles cases between the years 2002 and 2007. The laboratory diagnosis of measles was confirmed by detection of measles-specific IgM in oral fluid in conjunction with a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the MeV hemagglutinin gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 3 hypervariable region of the nucleoprotein gene was performed and three genotypes, all within measles clade D, were found to be circulating during this time period. In 2002 and 2003, genotype D8 (n = 2) was observed whereas genotype D7 was dominant in 2003 (n = 31). A distinct change in the circulating MeV genotype and increased genetic diversity was observed between 2004 and 2007. All cases were within genotype D4 (n = 32) but were phylogenetically distinct from each other. These data provide important epidemiologic baseline information on MeV in Ireland and facilitates detailed examination of measles transmission.
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A low density oligonucleotide microarray for the detection of viral and atypical bacterial respiratory pathogens.
J. Virol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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Acute respiratory tract infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and exert a considerable economic burden on healthcare systems. Acute respiratory tract infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract are caused by a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens, which require comprehensive laboratory investigations. Conventional serological and immunofluorescence-based diagnostic methods for acute respiratory tract infections lack sensitivity when compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches and the development of new diagnostic methodologies is required, to provide accurate, sensitive and rapid diagnoses. In the present study, a PCR-based low density oligonucleotide microarray was developed for the detection of 16 viral and two atypical bacterial pathogens. The performance of this DNA microarray-based analysis exhibited comparable sensitivities and specificities to multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (rtPCRs) confirming the potential diagnostic utility of the method. In contrast to routine multiplex PCR, the microarray incorporates an intrinsic redundancy as multiple and non-identical probes per target on the array allow direct intra-assay confirmation of positives. This study demonstrates that microarray technology provides a viable alternative to conventional serological-based approaches and multiplex PCR for pathogen identification in acute respiratory tract infections.
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Development and characterization of a high density SNP genotyping assay for cattle.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
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The success of genome-wide association (GWA) studies for the detection of sequence variation affecting complex traits in human has spurred interest in the use of large-scale high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and for marker-assisted selection in model and agricultural species. A cost-effective and efficient approach for the development of a custom genotyping assay interrogating 54,001 SNP loci to support GWA applications in cattle is described. A novel algorithm for achieving a compressed inter-marker interval distribution proved remarkably successful, with median interval of 37 kb and maximum predicted gap of <350 kb. The assay was tested on a panel of 576 animals from 21 cattle breeds and six outgroup species and revealed that from 39,765 to 46,492 SNP are polymorphic within individual breeds (average minor allele frequency (MAF) ranging from 0.24 to 0.27). The assay also identified 79 putative copy number variants in cattle. Utility for GWA was demonstrated by localizing known variation for coat color and the presence/absence of horns to their correct genomic locations. The combination of SNP selection and the novel spacing algorithm allows an efficient approach for the development of high-density genotyping platforms in species having full or even moderate quality draft sequence. Aspects of the approach can be exploited in species which lack an available genome sequence. The BovineSNP50 assay described here is commercially available from Illumina and provides a robust platform for mapping disease genes and QTL in cattle.
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Is there diagnostic value in detection of immunoglobulin g antibodies to the epstein-barr virus early antigen?
Biores Open Access
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The Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV EA) complex consists of multiple proteins with potential significance for diagnosis of EBV-related diseases. In many individuals, detection of antibody to the early antigen (EA) is a sign of active infection, but 20% of healthy people may have this antibody for years. We studied the role of EA immunoglobulin G (IgG) in individuals with atypical antibody responses in the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and in EBV-infected transplant patients. EA IgG was present in 72% of confirmed IM patients. A trend was observed between high viral loads and the presence of EA IgG and between low viral loads and the absence of EA IgG in EBV-associated disease negative liver transplant recipients. Three assays that measure serum EA IgG were compared; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA), and immunoblot assay. The automated CLIA was found to be more accurate than the ELISA when using the immunoblot assay as a "gold standard" assay in the detection of EA IgG. There may be a potential role for EA IgG testing, together with EBV viral load, in the prediction of transplant recipients at risk of EBV-associated disease; however, EA IgG does not play a significant role in the differential diagnosis of EBV infection in immunocompetent individuals.
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Hepatitis C virus in Vietnam: high prevalence of infection in dialysis and multi-transfused patients involving diverse and novel virus variants.
PLoS ONE
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Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a genetically diverse pathogen infecting approximately 2-3% of the worlds population. Herein, we describe results of a large, multicentre serological and molecular epidemiological study cataloguing the prevalence and genetic diversity of HCV in five regions of Vietnam; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. Individuals (n=8654) with varying risk factors for infection were analysed for the presence of HCV Ab/Ag and, in a subset of positive specimens, for HCV RNA levels (n=475) and genotype (n=282). In lower risk individuals, including voluntary blood donors, military recruits and pregnant women, the prevalence of infection was 0.5% (n=26/5250). Prevalence rates were significantly higher (p<0.001) in intravenous drug users (IDUs; 55.6%, n=556/1000), dialysis patients (26.6%, n=153/575) commercial sex workers (CSWs; 8.7%, n=87/1000), and recipients of multiple blood transfusions (6.0%, n=32/529). The prevalence of HCV in dialysis patients varied but remained high in all regions (11-43%) and was associated with the receipt of blood transfusions [OR: 2.08 (1.85-2.34), p=0.001], time from first transfusion [OR: 1.07 (1.01-1.13), p=0.023], duration of dialysis [OR: 1.31 (1.19-1.43), p<0.001] and male gender [OR: 1.60 (1.06-2.41), p=0.026]. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high genetic diversity, particularly amongst dialysis and multi-transfused patients, identifying subtypes 1a (33%), 1b (27%), 2a (0.4%), 3a (0.7%), 3b (1.1%), 6a (18.8%), 6e (6.0%), 6h (4.6%), 6l (6.4%) and 2 clusters of novel genotype 6 variants (2.1%). HCV genotype 1 predominated in Vietnam (60%, n=169/282) but the proportion of infections attributable to genotype 1 varied between regions and risk groups and, in the Southern part of Vietnam, genotype 6 viruses dominated in dialysis and multi-transfused patients (73.9%). This study confirms a high prevalence of HCV infection in Vietnamese IDUs and, notably, reveals high levels of HCV infection associated with dialysis and blood transfusion.
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A multicentre molecular analysis of hepatitis B and blood-borne virus coinfections in Viet Nam.
PLoS ONE
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Hepatitis B (HBV) infection is endemic in Viet Nam, with up to 8.4 million individuals estimated to be chronically infected. We describe results of a large, multicentre seroepidemiological and molecular study of the prevalence of HBV infection and blood-borne viral coinfections in Viet Nam. Individuals with varying risk factors for infection (n = 8654) were recruited from five centres; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. A mean prevalence rate of 10.7% was observed and levels of HBsAg were significantly higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (17.4%, n = 174/1000) and dialysis patients (14.3%, n = 82/575) than in lower-risk groups (9.4%; p<0.001). Coinfection with HIV was seen in 28% of HBV-infected IDUs (n = 49/174) and 15.2% of commercial sex workers (CSWs; n = 15/99). HCV infection was present in 89.8% of the HBV-HIV coinfected IDUs (n = 44/49) and 40% of HBV-HIV coinfected CSWs (n = 16/40). Anti-HDV was detected in 10.7% (n = 34/318) of HBsAg positive individuals. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV S gene (n = 187) showed a predominance of genotype B4 (82.6%); genotypes C1 (14.6%), B2 (2.7%) and C5 (0.5%) were also identified. The precore mutation G1896A was identified in 35% of all specimens, and was more frequently observed in genotype B (41%) than genotype C (3%; p<0.0001). In the immunodominant a region of the surface gene, point mutations were identified in 31% (n = 58/187) of sequences, and 2.2% (n = 4/187) and 5.3% (n = 10/187) specimens contained the major vaccine escape mutations G145A/R and P120L/Q/S/T, respectively. 368 HBsAg positive individuals were genotyped for the IL28B SNP rs12979860 and no significant association between the IL28B SNP and clearance of HBsAg, HBV viral load or HBeAg was observed. This study confirms the high prevalence of HBV infection in Viet Nam and also highlights the significant levels of blood-borne virus coinfections, which have important implications for hepatitis-related morbidity and development of effective management strategies.
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Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C infection after liver transplantation from IL28B rs12979860 CC donors.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol
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Genetic polymorphisms adjacent to IL28B have been previously associated with spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and a higher rate of sustained virological response to interferon-based treatment in HCV genotype 1-infected patients. A recent study has shown that patients with the CC genotype of the rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism upstream from the IL28B gene are more likely to clear HCV spontaneously relative to the CT or TT genotype. In the liver transplant cohort, HCV recurs almost universally in patients with detectable HCV RNA at the time of transplantation. The spontaneous clearance of HCV infection after transplant is very rare. We report two cases of spontaneous clearance of HCV genotype 1 infection after liver transplantation from homozygous IL28B CC donors. This finding may be explained by alterations in the host immune responses to HCV after transplantation with a CC donor liver, which has potential implications for donor selection in HCV-positive recipients.
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A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance.
Alisa K Manning, Marie-France Hivert, Robert A Scott, Jonna L Grimsby, Nabila Bouatia-Naji, Han Chen, Denis Rybin, Ching-Ti Liu, Lawrence F Bielak, Inga Prokopenko, Najaf Amin, Daniel Barnes, Gemma Cadby, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Erik Ingelsson, Anne U Jackson, Toby Johnson, Stavroula Kanoni, Claes Ladenvall, Vasiliki Lagou, Jari Lahti, Cécile Lecoeur, Yongmei Liu, María Teresa Martínez-Larrad, May E Montasser, Pau Navarro, John R B Perry, Laura J Rasmussen-Torvik, Perttu Salo, Naveed Sattar, Dmitry Shungin, Rona J Strawbridge, Toshiko Tanaka, Cornelia M van Duijn, Ping An, Mariza de Andrade, Jeanette S Andrews, Thor Aspelund, Mustafa Atalay, Yurii Aulchenko, Beverley Balkau, Stefania Bandinelli, Jacques S Beckmann, John P Beilby, Claire Bellis, Richard N Bergman, John Blangero, Mladen Boban, Michael Boehnke, Eric Boerwinkle, Lori L Bonnycastle, Dorret I Boomsma, Ingrid B Borecki, Yvonne Böttcher, Claude Bouchard, Eric Brunner, Danijela Budimir, Harry Campbell, Olga Carlson, Peter S Chines, Robert Clarke, Francis S Collins, Arturo Corbatón-Anchuelo, David Couper, Ulf de Faire, George V Dedoussis, Panos Deloukas, Maria Dimitriou, Josephine M Egan, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Michael R Erdos, Johan G Eriksson, Elodie Eury, Luigi Ferrucci, Ian Ford, Nita G Forouhi, Caroline S Fox, Maria Grazia Franzosi, Paul W Franks, Timothy M Frayling, Philippe Froguel, Pilar Galán, Eco de Geus, Bruna Gigante, Nicole L Glazer, Anuj Goel, Leif Groop, Vilmundur Gudnason, Göran Hallmans, Anders Hamsten, Ola Hansson, Tamara B Harris, Caroline Hayward, Simon Heath, Serge Hercberg, Andrew A Hicks, Aroon Hingorani, Albert Hofman, Jennie Hui, Joseph Hung, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Min A Jhun, Paul C D Johnson, J Wouter Jukema, Antti Jula, W H Kao, Jaakko Kaprio, Sharon L R Kardia, Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Ivana Kolčić, Peter Kovacs, Meena Kumari, Johanna Kuusisto, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Markku Laakso, Timo Lakka, Lars Lannfelt, G Mark Lathrop, Lenore J Launer, Karin Leander, Guo Li, Lars Lind, Jaana Lindström, Stéphane Lobbens, Ruth J F Loos, Jian'an Luan, Valeriya Lyssenko, Reedik Mägi, Patrik K E Magnusson, Michael Marmot, Pierre Meneton, Karen L Mohlke, Vincent Mooser, Mario A Morken, Iva Miljkovic, Narisu Narisu, Jeff O'Connell, Ken K Ong, Ben A Oostra, Lyle J Palmer, Aarno Palotie, James S Pankow, John F Peden, Nancy L Pedersen, Marina Pehlić, Leena Peltonen, Brenda Penninx, Marijana Pericic, Markus Perola, Louis Pérusse, Patricia A Peyser, Ozren Polašek, Peter P Pramstaller, Michael A Province, Katri Räikkönen, Rainer Rauramaa, Emil Rehnberg, Ken Rice, Jerome I Rotter, Igor Rudan, Aimo Ruokonen, Timo Saaristo, Maria Sabater-Lleal, Veikko Salomaa, David B Savage, Richa Saxena, Peter Schwarz, Udo Seedorf, Bengt Sennblad, Manuel Serrano-Ríos, Alan R Shuldiner, Eric J G Sijbrands, David S Siscovick, Johannes H Smit, Kerrin S Small, Nicholas L Smith, Albert Vernon Smith, Alena Stančáková, Kathleen Stirrups, Michael Stumvoll, Yan V Sun, Amy J Swift, Anke Tönjes, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Stella Trompet, André G Uitterlinden, Matti Uusitupa, Max Vikström, Veronique Vitart, Marie-Claude Vohl, Benjamin F Voight, Peter Vollenweider, Gérard Waeber, Dawn M Waterworth, Hugh Watkins, Eleanor Wheeler, Elisabeth Widén, Sarah H Wild, Sara M Willems, Gonneke Willemsen, James F Wilson, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Alan F Wright, Hanieh Yaghootkar, Diana Zelenika, Tatijana Zemunik, Lina Zgaga, , Nicholas J Wareham, Mark I McCarthy, Inês Barroso, Richard M Watanabe, Jose C Florez, Josée Dupuis, James B Meigs, Claudia Langenberg.
Nat. Genet.
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Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and ?-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associations with fasting insulin and glucose on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown loci associated with fasting insulin at P < 5 × 10(-8) in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496 non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, suggesting a role for these loci in insulin resistance pathways. The discovery of these loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology.
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Seroepidemiology of the recent mumps virus outbreaks in Ireland.
J. Clin. Virol.
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Two recent mumps outbreaks have occurred in Ireland in 2004/2005 and 2008/2009.
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HIV type 1 coreceptor tropism, CCR5 genotype, and integrase inhibitor resistance profiles in Vietnam: implications for the introduction of new antiretroviral regimens.
AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses
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In Vietnam, where an estimated 280,000 people will be HIV-positive by 2012, recommended antiretroviral regimens do not include more recently developed therapeutics, such as Integrase inhibitors (INI) and coreceptor antagonists. This study examined HIV-1 coreceptor tropism and INI drug resistance profiles, in parallel with CCR5 genotypes, in a cohort of 60 HIV-positive individuals from different regions of Vietnam. No evidence of INI resistance was detected. Some 40% of individuals had X4-tropic HIV-1, making them unsuitable for treatment with CCR5 antagonists. We identified a novel CCR5 variant-S272P-along with other, previously reported variants: G106R, C178R, W153C, R223Q, and S336I. Interestingly, CCR5 variants known to affect HIV-1 infectivity were observed only in individuals harboring X4-tropic virus. Together, this study presents valuable baseline information on HIV-1 INI resistance, coreceptor tropism, and CCR5 variants in HIV-positive individuals in Vietnam. This should help inform policy on the future use of novel antiretrovirals in Vietnam.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.