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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: diarrhea, no longer required?
J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2013
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Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and diarrhea have been hallmarks in the diagnosis of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). We report 2 cases of genetically confirmed SDS in patients who presented with an unusual phenotype. Patient #1 presented with pancytopenia without other system involvement, while patient #2 presented with severe neutropenia, anemia, and a bifid thumb. Neither patient had diarrhea or malabsorption. Both patients had the classic heterozygous mutations c183_184 TA>CT and c.258+2 T>C in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome gene. Incomplete phenotypes may be more common than previously recognized in bone marrow failure syndromes; gastrointestinal symptoms should not be considered a prerequisite for SDS.
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A phase 1 trial of eltrombopag in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation after total body irradiation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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Stem cell transplantation can be associated with significant periods of thrombocytopenia, necessitating platelet transfusions and contributing to the risk of bleeding. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists have been shown to enhance platelet counts in other clinical settings, and so a phase 1 clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics, and maximum tolerated dose of once-daily eltrombopag in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing total body irradiation ?400 cGy. Eltrombopag was examined at dosage levels of 75, 150, 225, and 300 mg given orally once daily for 27 days, starting at 24 to 48 hours post-transplantation. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed over a 24-hour period after the first dose of eltrombopag, as well as during the second week of treatment (steady-state). Nineteen patients were enrolled, 15 of whom completed protocol treatments. Three patients completed each dose level up to 225 mg, and 6 completed treatment at the highest dose of 300 mg. Four patients were replaced because drug compliance was <75% of planned doses. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in this heterogeneous post-transplantation patient population. Common adverse events were related to standard stem cell transplantation. One episode of pulmonary embolus occurred 9 days after discontinuation of eltrombopag, and the only other thromboembolic episode was a grade 2 catheter-related clot. We conclude that up to 27 days of once-daily dosing of eltrombopag after stem cell transplantation is well tolerated.
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How I treat childhood CML.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-30-2011
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Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is composed of 3% of pediatric leukemias, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. Imatinib has revolutionized the treatment for adult CML by eliminating allogeneic stem cell transplantation for almost all patients in chronic phase. Shown effective in pediatric CML, imatinib and successive tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have provided more therapeutic options. Because stem cell transplantation has been better tolerated in children and adolescents, the decision to treat by either TKI or transplantation is controversial. We present a recent case of a 12-month-old boy diagnosed with BCR-ABL(+) CML to highlight the controversies in treatment recommendations. We review the pediatric stem cell transplantation outcomes as well as the pediatric experience with imatinib and other TKIs. Finally, we compare the side effects as well as costs associated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation versus TKI therapy. We recommend that frontline therapy for pediatric CML in chronic phase is TKI therapy without transplantation. Patients in accelerated or blast crisis or who fail to reach landmarks on TKIs either because of intolerance or resistance should pursue stem cell transplantation. Although we recommend adopting adult clinical experience to guide therapeutic decision making, the issues of infant CML, drug formulation, pharmacokinetics, and adolescent compliance merit clinical investigation.
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Allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation in pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes: improved outcomes for de novo disease.
Pediatr Transplant
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2011
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We report 23 consecutive pediatric patients with MDS who received allogeneic HSCT on IRB approved protocols between 1992 and 2009 at Childrens Memorial Hospital (Chicago, IL). Nine patients had de novo MDS, whereas 14 patients had treatment-related MDS. All patients had a documented cytogenetic abnormality, and monosomy 7/7q- was seen in 12 patients (52%). Fourteen of 23 patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen; RIC regimens were used for the remaining nine. Five patients relapsed post-transplant, including four patients who received RIC transplant and four patients with treatment-related MDS. For the entire group, estimated five-yr RFS and OS were 47% and 50%, respectively. Treatment-related MDS was associated with decreased RFS in comparison with de novo MDS (33% vs. 70%, p = 0.05). Five-year OS rates reached 80% for those with de novo MDS. RIC regimens were associated with decreased three-yr RFS in comparison with myeloablative regimens (22% vs. 68%, p = 0.02). There was no correlation of survival with blast count at diagnosis, IPSS score, cytogenetic abnormality, donor type, or HLA match. Larger series are needed to confirm prognostic factors so that higher-risk patients can be targeted with novel approaches.
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Anthracycline-induced cardiac toxicity more likely in underweight childhood cancer survivors.
J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2010
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We did a retrospective medical record and echocardiogram review of patients with history of anthracyclines and/or radiation seen in a long-term survivor clinic from 2000-2007.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.