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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Multifactorial hypercalcemia and literature review on primary hyperparathyroidism associated with lymphoma.
Case Rep Endocrinol
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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The most common cause of hypercalcemia in hospitalized patients is malignancy. Primary hyperparathyroidism most commonly causes hypercalcemia in the outpatient setting. These two account for over 90% of all cases of hypercalcemia. Hypercalcemia can be divided into PTH-mediated and PTH-independent variants. Primary hyperparathyroidism, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, familial hyperparathyroidism, and secondary hyperparathyroidism are PTH mediated. The most common PTH-independent type of hypercalcemia is malignancy related. Several mechanisms lead to hypercalcemia in malignancy-direct osteolysis by metastatic disease or, more commonly, production of humoral factors by the primary tumor also known as humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy that accounts for about 80% of malignancy-related hypercalcemia. The majority of HHM is caused by tumor-produced parathyroid hormone-related protein and less frequently production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D or parathyroid hormone by the tumor. We report the rare case of a patient with hypercalcemia and diagnosed primary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had persistent hypercalcemia after surgical removal of parathyroid adenoma with recorded significant decrease in PTH level. After continued investigation it was found that the patient also had elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and further studies confirmed a large spleen mass that was later confirmed to be a lymphoma. This is a rare example of two concomitant causes of hypercalcemia requiring therapy.
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Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state.
Endocrinol. Metab. Clin. North Am.
PUBLISHED: 11-30-2013
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Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and the hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are potentially fatal hyperglycemic crises that occur as acute complications of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. The authors provide a review of the current epidemiology, precipitating factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of DKA and HHS. The discovery of insulin in 1921 changed the life expectancy of patients with diabetes mellitus dramatically. Today, almost a century later, DKA and HHS remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality across different countries, ages, races, and socioeconomic groups and a significant economic burden for society.
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Altered functional balance of Gfi-1 and Gfi-1b as an alternative cause of reticular dysgenesis?
Med. Hypotheses
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2009
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Reticular dysgenesis (RD) is a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The underlying genetic defect for most cases of RD was recently identified in the gene encoding adenylate kinase 2 (AK2). However, rare patients with RD and no mutations in AK2 exist, suggesting that mutations in other genes may also cause RD. Although rare, RD has a devastating presentation involving severe neutropenia and T cell lymphopenia, in addition to life non-threatening, but still disabling sensori-neural deafness. An identical phenotype is observed in mice deficient for growth factor independence-1 (Gfi-1) or transgenic for Gfi-1b, related nucleoproteins with opposing, antagonizing roles in development. We hypothesize that a genetically based, altered functional balance between these two factors may be an alternative cause of RD.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.