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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Clinical Outcomes of Splenectomy in Children: Report of the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) Registry.
Am. J. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2014
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The outcomes of children with congenital hemolytic anemia (CHA) undergoing total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) remain unclear. In this study, we collected data from 100 children with CHA who underwent TS or PS from 2005-2013 at 16 sites in the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium using a patient registry. We analyzed demographics and baseline clinical status, operative details, and outcomes at 4, 24, and 52 weeks after surgery. Results were summarized as hematologic outcomes, short-term adverse events (AEs) (? 30 days after surgery), and long-term AEs (31-365 days after surgery). For children with hereditary spherocytosis, after surgery there was an increase in hemoglobin (baseline 10.1 ± 1.8 gm/dl, 52 week 12.8 ± 1.6 gm/dl; mean ± SD), decrease in reticulocyte and bilirubin as well as control of symptoms. Children with sickle cell disease had control of clinical symptoms after surgery, but had no change in hematologic parameters. There was an 11% rate of short-term AEs and 11% rate of long-term AEs. As we accumulate more subjects and longer follow-up, use of a patient registry should enhance our capacity for clinical trials and engage all stakeholders in the decision-making process.
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Complications of implantable venous access devices in patients with sickle cell disease.
Am. J. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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Implantable venous access devices (VADs) are used in sickle cell disease (SCD) for patients with poor venous access to facilitate chronic blood transfusions and manage acute complications. We attempted to define the frequency of bloodstream infections (BSI) and thrombosis in adults and children with SCD and VADs. We performed a single-institution, retrospective review of VAD-associated infection and thrombosis in patients with SCD. Thirty-two patients (median age 20 years, range, 1-59) had 86 VADs placed (median, 2.7 VADs per patient, range, 1-7) with a total of 41,292 catheter days (median, 1,376 days; range, 323-3,999). Mean catheter lifespan in adults (691 days ± 123) was not significantly higher than children (614 days ± 154). A total of 66 VAD-associated BSI (1.59 infections per 1,000 catheter days) occurred in 17 of 32 (53%) patients. Children with VADs had fewer BSI (3 of 10; 30%) than adults (14 of 22; 64%, P = 0.08). 24 catheter-associated thromboses (0.49 thromboses per 1,000 catheter days) occurred in 10 of 32 (41%) of patients. Children also had fewer VAD-associated-thrombosis (1 of 10; 10%) than adults (9 of 22; 40%, P = 0.08). In conclusion, the use of VADs in SCD was linked to a significant rate of infection and thrombosis.
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Rapamycin does not control hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in LCMV-infected perforin-deficient mice.
Pediatr Blood Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2011
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Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immunodysregulatory disorder for which more effective treatments are needed. The macrolide rapamycin has immunosuppressive properties, making it an attractive candidate for controlling the aberrant T cell activation that occurs in HLH. To investigate its therapeutic potential, we used rapamycin to treat Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV)-infected perforin-deficient (Prf1(-/-)) mice according to a well-established model of HLH. At the regimens tested, rapamycin did not improve weight loss, splenomegaly, hemophagocytosis, cytopenias, or proinflammatory cytokine production in LCMV-infected Prf1(-/-) animals. Thus, single agent rapamycin appears ineffective in treating the clinical and laboratory manifestations of LCMV-induced HLH.
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Randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial of tadalafil in Raynauds phenomenon secondary to systemic sclerosis.
J. Rheumatol.
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2009
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Raynauds phenomenon (RP) is an important clinical feature of systemic sclerosis (SSc) for which consistently effective therapies are lacking. The study was designed to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of tadalafil, a selective, long acting type V cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE-5) inhibitor, in this clinical syndrome.
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Lymphocytic vasculitis involving the central nervous system occurs in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease in the absence of Epstein-Barr virus infection.
Pediatr Blood Cancer
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2009
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X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an immunodeficiency caused by defects in the adaptor molecule SAP. The manifestations of XLP generally occur following Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and include fulminant mononucleosis, hypogammaglobulinemia and lymphoma. In this report, we describe two unrelated patients with fatal T-cell-mediated central nervous system vasculitis for whom repeated serologic and molecular testing for EBV was negative. In both patients, clonal T-cell populations were observed, but neither demonstrated evidence of lymphoma. Thus, loss of SAP function can lead to dysregulated immune responses characterized by the uncontrolled expansion and activation of T cells independent of EBV infection.
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Evaluation of partial and total splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease using an Internet-based registry.
Pediatr Blood Cancer
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Clinical outcomes of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) who undergo total or partial splenectomy (PS) are poorly defined. The purpose of this retrospective study was to initiate an Internet-based registry to facilitate analysis of clinical outcomes for these children. We hypothesized that both surgical procedures would be well tolerated and would eliminate risk of splenic sequestration.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.