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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency in 11 screening programs in the United States.
JAMA
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2014
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Newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) using assays to detect T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) began in Wisconsin in 2008, and SCID was added to the national recommended uniform panel for newborn screened disorders in 2010. Currently 23 states, the District of Columbia, and the Navajo Nation conduct population-wide newborn screening for SCID. The incidence of SCID is estimated at 1 in 100,000 births.
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Transplantation outcomes for severe combined immunodeficiency, 2000-2009.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2014
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The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium was formed to analyze the results of hematopoietic-cell transplantation in children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other primary immunodeficiencies. Factors associated with a good transplantation outcome need to be identified in order to design safer and more effective curative therapy, particularly for children with SCID diagnosed at birth.
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A trial of alemtuzumab adjunctive therapy in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with minimal conditioning for severe combined immunodeficiency.
Pediatr Transplant
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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For infants with SCID the ideal conditioning regimen before allogeneic HCT would omit cytotoxic chemotherapy to minimize short- and long-term complications. We performed a prospective pilot trial with alemtuzumab monotherapy to overcome NK-cell mediated immunologic barriers to engraftment. We enrolled four patients who received CD34-selected haploidentical cells, two of whom failed to engraft donor T cells. The two patients who engrafted had delayed T-cell reconstitution, despite rapid clearance of circulating alemtuzumab. Although well-tolerated, alemtuzumab failed to overcome immunologic barriers to donor engraftment. Furthermore, alemtuzumab may slow T-cell development in patients with SCID in the setting of a T-cell depleted graft.
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A trial of plerixafor adjunctive therapy in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with minimal conditioning for severe combined immunodeficiency.
Pediatr Transplant
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2014
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For infants with SCID, the ideal conditioning regimen before allogeneic HCT would omit cytotoxic chemotherapy to minimize short- and long-term complications. We performed a prospective pilot trial with G-CSF plus plerixafor given to the host to mobilize HSC from their niches. We enrolled six patients who received CD34-selected haploidentical cells and one who received T-replete matched unrelated BM. All patients receiving G-CSF and plerixafor had generally poor CD34(+) cell and Lin(-) CD34(+) CD38(-) CD90(+) CD45RA(-) HSC mobilization, and developed donor T cells, but no donor myeloid or B-cell engraftment. Although well tolerated, G-CSF plus plerixafor alone failed to overcome physical barriers to donor engraftment.
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Recommendations for live viral and bacterial vaccines in immunodeficient patients and their close contacts.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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The present uncertainty of which live viral or bacterial vaccines can be given to immunodeficient patients and the growing neglect of societal adherence to routine immunizations has prompted the Medical Advisory Committee of the Immune Deficiency Foundation to issue recommendations based on published literature and the collective experience of the committee members. These recommendations address the concern for immunodeficient patients acquiring infections from healthy subjects who have not been immunized or who are shedding live vaccine-derived viral or bacterial organisms. Such transmission of infectious agents can occur within the hospital, clinic, or home or at any public gathering. Collectively, we define this type of transmission as close-contact spread of infectious disease that is particularly relevant in patients with impaired immunity who might have an infection when exposed to subjects carrying vaccine-preventable infectious diseases or who have recently received a live vaccine. Immunodeficient patients who have received therapeutic hematopoietic stem transplantation are also at risk during the time when immune reconstitution is incomplete or while they are receiving immunosuppressive agents to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease. This review recommends the general education of what is known about vaccine-preventable or vaccine-derived diseases being spread to immunodeficient patients at risk for close-contact spread of infection and describes the relative risks for a child with severe immunodeficiency. The review also recommends a balance between the need to protect vulnerable subjects and their social needs to integrate into society, attend school, and benefit from peer education.
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USIDNET: a strategy to build a community of clinical immunologists.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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Information about patients with primary immune deficiencies can be scarce because of the rarity of the disorders. Individual centers rarely have sufficient patients to educate trainees and garner collective wisdom. Registries for many diseases have proven their worth by providing essential information on disease spectrum, treatments and natural history. This study describes the construction and use of a registry for patients with primary immune deficiencies and other efforts to improve knowledge and care for affected patients and their families.
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B-cell development and functions and therapeutic options in adenosine deaminase-deficient patients.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2014
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Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes severe cellular and humoral immune defects and dysregulation because of metabolic toxicity. Alterations in B-cell development and function have been poorly studied. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy (GT) are therapeutic options for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow (BM) transplant donor.
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Bone density and fractures in autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Recurrent Infection Syndrome (AD-HIES) is caused by mutations in STAT3 and characterized by eczema, recurrent bacterial infections, and skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities. To further understand the minimal trauma fractures of AD-HIES, we examined bone mineral density (BMD) and laboratory markers of bone turnover.
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Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor ??(+) T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350.
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Primary immunodeficiency diseases: an update on the classification from the international union of immunological societies expert committee for primary immunodeficiency.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition, we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of PIDs. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up-to-date catalog of all known PIDs and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases.
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A systematic analysis of recombination activity and genotype-phenotype correlation in human recombination-activating gene 1 deficiency.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2013
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The recombination-activating gene (RAG) 1/2 proteins play a critical role in the development of T and B cells by initiating the VDJ recombination process that leads to generation of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor repertoire. Pathogenic mutations in the RAG1/2 genes result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from T(-)B(-) severe combined immune deficiency to delayed-onset disease with granuloma formation, autoimmunity, or both. It is not clear what contributes to such heterogeneity of phenotypes.
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Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2013
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The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.
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A phenotypic approach for IUIS PID classification and diagnosis: guidelines for clinicians at the bedside.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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The number of genetically defined Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PID) has increased exponentially, especially in the past decade. The biennial classification published by the IUIS PID expert committee is therefore quickly expanding, providing valuable information regarding the disease-causing genotypes, the immunological anomalies, and the associated clinical features of PIDs. These are grouped in eight, somewhat overlapping, categories of immune dysfunction. However, based on this immunological classification, the diagnosis of a specific PID from the clinicians observation of an individual clinical and/or immunological phenotype remains difficult, especially for non-PID specialists. The purpose of this work is to suggest a phenotypic classification that forms the basis for diagnostic trees, leading the physician to particular groups of PIDs, starting from clinical features and combining routine immunological investigations along the way. We present 8 colored diagnostic figures that correspond to the 8 PID groups in the IUIS Classification, including all the PIDs cited in the 2011 update of the IUIS classification and most of those reported since.
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The natural history of children with severe combined immunodeficiency: baseline features of the first fifty patients of the primary immune deficiency treatment consortium prospective study 6901.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2013
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The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) consists of 33 centers in North America. We hypothesized that the analysis of uniform data on patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) enrolled in a prospective protocol will identify variables that contribute to optimal outcomes following treatment. We report baseline clinical, immunologic, and genetic features of the first 50 patients enrolled, and the initial therapies administered, reflecting current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of both typical (n?=?37) and atypical forms (n?=?13) of SCID. From August 2010 to May 2012, patients with suspected SCID underwent evaluation and therapy per local center practices. Diagnostic information was reviewed by the PIDTC eligibility review panel, and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) details were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Most patients (92 %) had mutations in a known SCID gene. Half of the patients were diagnosed by newborn screening or family history, were younger than those diagnosed by clinical signs (median 15 vs. 181 days; P?=?<0.0001), and went to HCT at a median of 67 days vs. 214 days of life (P?=?<0.0001). Most patients (92 %) were treated with HCT within 1-2 months of diagnosis. Three patients were treated with gene therapy and 1 with enzyme replacement. The PIDTC plans to enroll over 250 such patients and analyze short and long-term outcomes for factors beneficial or deleterious to survival, clinical outcome, and T- and B-cell reconstitution, and which biomarkers are predictive of these outcomes.
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Newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency and T-cell lymphopenia in California: results of the first 2 years.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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Assay of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in dried blood spots obtained at birth permits population-based newborn screening (NBS) for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).
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Intermediate phenotypes in patients with autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome caused by somatic mosaicism.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2013
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Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is caused by mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). We describe 2 subjects in whom somatic mosaicism was associated with intermediate phenotypes.
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The case for newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency and related disorders.
Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2011
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Early detection of primary immunodeficiency is recognized as important for avoiding infectious complications that compromise outcomes. In particular, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is fatal in infancy unless affected infants can be diagnosed before the onset of devastating infections and provided with an immune system through allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation, enzyme replacement, or gene therapy. A biomarker of normal T cell development, T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), can be measured in DNA isolated from the dried blood spots routinely obtained for newborn screening; infants identified as lacking TRECs can thus receive confirmatory testing and prompt intervention. Early results of TREC testing of newborns in five states indicate that this addition to the newborn screening panel can be successfully integrated into state public health programs. A variety of cases with typical SCID genotypes and other T lymphocytopenic conditions have been detected in a timely manner and referred for appropriate early treatment.
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IL-21 is the primary common ? chain-binding cytokine required for human B-cell differentiation in vivo.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2011
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SCID resulting from mutations in IL2RG or JAK3 is characterized by lack of T and natural killer cells; B cells are present in normal number, but antibody responses are defective. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is curative for SCID. However, B-cell dysfunction persists in a substantial proportion of patients. We hypothesized that impaired B-cell responses after HCT in IL2RG/JAK3 deficiency results from poor donor B-cell engraftment and defective ?c-dependent cytokine signaling in host B cells. To test this, and to identify which ?c cytokine(s) is critical for humoral immunity, we studied 28 transplanted patients with IL2RG/JAK3 deficiency. Lack of donor B-cell engraftment associated with persistent humoral dysfunction and significantly reduced memory B cells. B-cell proliferation induced by CD40L alone or together with CpG, anti-Ig, IL-4, IL-10, or IL-13 was comparable in healthy controls and in post-HCT SCID patients, irrespective of their chimerism status. However, in vitro stimulation with CD40L/IL-21 induced B-cell proliferation, plasmablast differentiation, and antibody secretion in patients with donor B cells, but not in patients with autologous B cells. These data imply that IL-21-mediated signaling is critical for long-lived humoral immunity and to restore antibody responses in IL2RG/JAK3-deficient patients after HCT. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with CD40L/IL-21 can predict in vivo B-cell immunity in IL2RG/JAK3 SCID after transplantation.
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Neonatal screening for severe combined immunodeficiency.
Curr. Opin. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Population-based newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and related disorders has been instituted in five states, with several more planning to add this testing to their newborn screening panels. This review summarizes the rationale, development and implementation of SCID screening programs to date and highlights current and future challenges.
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Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to FAS mutations outside the signal-transducing death domain: molecular mechanisms and clinical penetrance.
Genet. Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2011
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Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is a disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis. Although FAS molecules bearing mutations in the signal-transducing intracellular death domain exhibit dominant-negative interference with FAS-mediated apoptosis, mechanisms for pathology of non-death domain FAS mutations causing autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome are poorly defined.
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Primary immunodeficiency diseases: an update on the classification from the international union of immunological societies expert committee for primary immunodeficiency.
Front Immunol
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2011
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We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiency diseases, compiled by the ad hoc Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. As compared to the previous edition, more than 15 novel disease entities have been added in the updated version. For each disorders, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This updated classification is meant to help in the diagnostic approach to patients with these diseases.
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Genotype, phenotype, and outcomes of nine patients with T-B+NK+ SCID.
Pediatr Transplant
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2011
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There are few reports of clinical presentation, genotype, and HCT outcomes for patients with T-B+NK+ SCID. Between 1981 and 2007, eight of 84 patients with SCID who received and/or were followed after HCT at UCSF had the T-B+NK+ phenotype. One additional patient with T-B+NK+ SCID was identified as the sibling of a patient treated at UCSF. Chart reviews were performed. Molecular analyses of IL7R, IL2RG, JAK3, and the genes encoding the CD3 T-cell receptor components ? (CD3D), ? (CD3E), and ? (CD3Z) were carried out. IL7R mutations were documented in four patients and CD3D mutations in two others. Three patients had no defects found. Only two of nine patients had an HLA-matched related HCT donor. Both survived, and neither developed GVHD. Five of seven recipients of haploidentical grafts survived. Although the majority of reported cases of T-B+NK+ SCID are caused by defects in IL7R, CD3 complex defects were also found in this series and should be considered when evaluating patients with T-B+NK+ SCID. Additional genes, mutations in which account for T-B+NK+ SCID, remain to be found. Better approaches to early diagnosis and HCT treatment are needed for patients lacking an HLA-matched related donor.
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A Markov model to analyze cost-effectiveness of screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).
Mol. Genet. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of universal neonatal screening for T cell lymphocytopenia in enhancing quality of life and life expectancy for children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).
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Deficient T Cell Receptor Excision Circles (TRECs) in autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome caused by DOCK8 mutation: implications for pathogenesis and potential detection by newborn screening.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Loss of function of DOCK8 is the major cause of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome, a primary immunodeficiency with adaptive and innate immune dysfunction. Patients affected with ARHIES have atopic dermatitis and recurrent, potentially life-threatening viral and bacterial infections. Three consanguineous Pakistani siblings presented with severe atopic dermatitis and superinfection. Direct sequencing of DOCK8 in all three affected siblings demonstrated homozygosity for a deleterious, novel exon 14 frame shift mutation. Current newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID) and related T cell disorders relies on the quantitation of T Cell Receptor Excision Cells (TRECs) in dried blood spots (DBS). Significantly, both older affected siblings had undetectable TRECs, and TREC copy number was reduced in the youngest sibling. These findings suggest that AR-HIES may be detected by TREC newborn screening, and this diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of newborns with abnormal TRECs who do not have typical SCID.
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Early vs. delayed diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency: a family perspective survey.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2010
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Infants affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) are susceptible to severe and recurrent infections and do not survive unless provided with immune reconstituting treatments. In the absence of population-based newborn screening, infants with SCID who do not have an affected older relative are ascertained only after they have developed infections. However, only limited data are available from the perspective of patients and families to indicate what proportion of SCID cases might benefit from earlier detection by pre-symptomatic screening, whether adequate treatment facilities are available, and how screening could improve SCID treatment outcomes. A survey of parents of children with SCID evaluated family history, pre- and post-diagnosis events, outcomes, and impact of SCID on families. Affected infants diagnosed with SCID as neonates had better survival, demonstrating the potential benefit of universal newborn screening.
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Expansion of immunoglobulin-secreting cells and defects in B cell tolerance in Rag-dependent immunodeficiency.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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The contribution of B cells to the pathology of Omenn syndrome and leaky severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has not been previously investigated. We have studied a mut/mut mouse model of leaky SCID with a homozygous Rag1 S723C mutation that impairs, but does not abrogate, V(D)J recombination activity. In spite of a severe block at the pro-B cell stage and profound B cell lymphopenia, significant serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, and IgE and a high proportion of Ig-secreting cells were detected in mut/mut mice. Antibody responses to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-Ficoll and production of high-affinity antibodies to TNP-keyhole limpet hemocyanin were severely impaired, even after adoptive transfer of wild-type CD4(+) T cells. Mut/mut mice produced high amounts of low-affinity self-reactive antibodies and showed significant lymphocytic infiltrates in peripheral tissues. Autoantibody production was associated with impaired receptor editing and increased serum B cell-activating factor (BAFF) concentrations. Autoantibodies and elevated BAFF levels were also identified in patients with Omenn syndrome and leaky SCID as a result of hypomorphic RAG mutations. These data indicate that the stochastic generation of an autoreactive B cell repertoire, which is associated with defects in central and peripheral checkpoints of B cell tolerance, is an important, previously unrecognized, aspect of immunodeficiencies associated with hypomorphic RAG mutations.
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Somatic FAS mutations are common in patients with genetically undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2010
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Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated numbers of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline mutations of the FAS gene (type Ia), whereas some cases have been noted to have a somatic mutation of FAS primarily in their DNT cells. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with somatic FAS mutations among a group of our ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and to further characterize them. We found more than one-third (12 of 31) of the patients tested had somatic FAS mutations, primarily involving the intracellular domain of FAS resulting in loss of normal FAS signaling. Similar to ALPS type Ia patients, the somatic ALPS patients had increased DNT cell numbers and elevated levels of serum vitamin B(12), interleukin-10, and sFAS-L. These data support testing for somatic FAS mutations in DNT cells from ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and a similar clinical and laboratory phenotype to that of ALPS type Ia. These findings also highlight the potential role for somatic mutations in the pathogenesis of nonmalignant and/or autoimmune hematologic conditions in adults and children.
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Mutations in STAT3 and diagnostic guidelines for hyper-IgE syndrome.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2010
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The hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections of the lung and skin, elevated serum IgE, and involvement of the soft and bony tissues. Recently, HIES has been associated with heterozygous dominant-negative mutations in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and severe reductions of T(H)17 cells.
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Primary immunodeficiencies: 2009 update.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2009
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More than 50 years after Ogdeon Brutons discovery of congenital agammaglobulinemia, human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) continue to unravel novel molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern development and function of the human immune system. This report provides the updated classification of PIDs that has been compiled by the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee on Primary Immunodeficiencies after its biannual meeting in Dublin, Ireland, in June 2009. Since the appearance of the last classification in 2007, novel forms of PID have been discovered, and additional pathophysiology mechanisms that account for PID in human beings have been unraveled. Careful analysis and prompt recognition of these disorders is essential to prompt effective forms of treatment and thus to improve survival and quality of life in patients affected with PIDs.
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Large deletions and point mutations involving the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) in the autosomal-recessive form of hyper-IgE syndrome.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2009
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The genetic etiologies of the hyper-IgE syndromes are diverse. Approximately 60% to 70% of patients with hyper-IgE syndrome have dominant mutations in STAT3, and a single patient was reported to have a homozygous TYK2 mutation. In the remaining patients with hyper-IgE syndrome, the genetic etiology has not yet been identified.
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Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: recognition, diagnosis, and management.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2009
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More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCT as an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases.
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Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) associated with a Coronin-1A mutation and a chromosome 16p11.2 deletion.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2009
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Defects causing severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) have been reported in pathways mediating antigen receptor rearrangement, antigen receptor and cytokine signaling, and purine metabolism. Recognizing that the actin regulator Coronin-1A is essential for development of a normal peripheral T cell compartment in mouse models, we identified absence of Coronin-1A in a girl with T-B+NK+ SCID who suffered recurrent infections including severe post-vaccination varicella at age 13 months. Murine Coronin-1A is essential for the release of T cells from the thymus, consistent with the paradoxically detectable thymus in our patient. Molecular analysis revealed a 2 bp deletion in the paternal CORO1A coding sequence paired with a 600 kb de novo deletion encompassing CORO1A on the maternal allele. This genomic region at 16p11.2 is subject to recurrent copy number variations associated with autism spectrum disorders, including attention deficit and hyperactivity, present in our patient. This case highlights the first link between actin cytoskeleton regulation and SCID.
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Treatment of patients with new onset Type 1 diabetes with a single course of anti-CD3 mAb Teplizumab preserves insulin production for up to 5 years.
Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Anti-CD3 mAbs may prolong beta cell function up to 2 years in patients with new onset Type 1 diabetes (T1DM). A randomized open label trial of anti-CD3 mAb, Teplizumab, in T1DM was stopped after 10 subjects because of increased adverse events than in a previous trial related with higher dosing of drug. Teplizumab caused transient reduction in circulating T cells, but the recovered cells were not new thymic emigrants because T cell receptor excision circles were not increased. There was a trend for reduced loss of C-peptide over 2 years with drug treatment (p=0.1), and insulin use was lower (p<0.001). In 4 drug-treated subjects followed up to 60 months, C-peptide responses were maintained. We conclude that increased doses of Teplizumab are associated with greater adverse events without improved efficacy. The drug may marginate rather than deplete T cells. C-peptide levels may remain detectable up to 5 years after treatment.
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Use of rituximab for refractory cytopenias associated with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).
Pediatr Blood Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2009
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ALPS is a disorder of apoptosis resulting in accumulation of autoreactive lymphocytes, leading to marked lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and multilineage cytopenias due to splenic sequestration and/or autoimmune destruction often presenting in childhood. We summarize our experience of rituximab use during the last 8 years in 12 patients, 9 children, and 3 adults, out of 259 individuals with ALPS, belonging to 166 families currently enrolled in studies at the National Institutes of Health.
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Newborn screening for SCID identifies patients with ataxia telangiectasia.
J. Clin. Immunol.
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Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by failure of T lymphocyte development and absent or very low T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), DNA byproducts of T cell maturation. Newborn screening for TRECs to identify SCID is now performed in several states using PCR of DNA from universally collected dried blood spots (DBS). In addition to infants with typical SCID, TREC screening identifies infants with T lymphocytopenia who appear healthy and in whom a SCID diagnosis cannot be confirmed. Deep sequencing was employed to find causes of T lymphocytopenia in such infants.
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An update on the hyper-IgE syndromes.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
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ABSTRACT: The hyper-IgE syndromes (HIES; originally named Jobs syndrome) are a collection of primary immunodeficiency syndromes resulting in elevated serum IgE levels and typified by recurrent staphylococcal skin abscesses, eczema and pulmonary infections. The disorder has autosomal dominant and recessive forms. Autosomal dominant HIES has been shown to be mainly due to STAT3 mutations and additionally results in connective tissue, skeletal, vascular and dental abnormalities. Autosomal recessive HIES has been shown to be mainly due to mutations in DOCK8; these patients are more prone to viral skin infections instead. This review article discusses the common clinical features of the syndrome, the genetic mutations responsible and the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as treatments currently used.
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Cellular calibrators to quantitate T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in clinical samples.
Mol. Genet. Metab.
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T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) are circular DNA molecules formed during rearrangement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) genes during lymphocyte development. Copy number of the junctional portion of the ?Rec-?J? TREC, assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using DNA from dried blood spots (DBS), is a biomarker for newly formed T cells and absent or low numbers of TRECs indicate SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) or T lymphocytopenia. No quantitation standard for TRECs exists. To permit comparison of TREC qPCR results with a reliable method for counting TRECs across different laboratories, we sought to construct a stable cell line containing a normal human chromosomal constitution and a single copy of the TREC junction sequence. A human EBV (Epstein Barr virus)-transformed B-cell line was transduced with a lentivirus encoding mCherry fluorescence, puromycin resistance and the ?Rec-?J? TREC sequence. A TREC-EBV cell line, with each cell carrying a single lentiviral insertion was established, expanded and shown to have one TREC copy per diploid genome. Graded numbers of TREC-EBV cells added to aliquots of T lymphocyte depleted blood showed TREC copy number proportional to TREC-EBV cell number. TREC-EBV cells, therefore, constitute a reproducible cellular calibrator for TREC assays, useful for both population-based screening for severe combined immunodeficiency and evaluation of naïve T-cell production in clinical settings.
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Recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated subcutaneous infusion of human immunoglobulins for primary immunodeficiency.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
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Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IGSC) replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency (PI) is equally efficacious to intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV), induces fewer systemic reactions, and may be self-infused. Limited SC infusion volumes and reduced bioavailability, however, necessitate multiple infusion sites, more frequent treatment, and dose adjustment to achieve pharmacokinetic equivalence. Recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) increases SC tissue permeability and facilitates dispersion and absorption, enabling administration of monthly doses in one site.
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Transcription factor zinc finger and BTB domain 1 is essential for lymphocyte development.
J. Immunol.
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Absent T lymphocytes were unexpectedly found in homozygotes of a transgenic mouse from an unrelated project. T cell development did not progress beyond double-negative stage 1 thymocytes, resulting in a hypocellular, vestigial thymus. B cells were present, but NK cell number and B cell isotype switching were reduced. Transplantation of wild-type hematopoietic cells corrected the defect, which was traced to a deletion involving five contiguous genes at the transgene insertion site on chromosome 12C3. Complementation using bacterial artificial chromosome transgenesis implicated zinc finger BTB-POZ domain protein 1 (Zbtb1) in the immunodeficiency, confirming its role in T cell development and suggesting involvement in B and NK cell differentiation. Targeted disruption of Zbtb1 recapitulated the T(-)B(+)NK(-) SCID phenotype of the original transgenic animal. Knockouts for Zbtb1 had expanded populations of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells and also multipotent and early lymphoid lineages, suggesting a differentiation bottleneck for common lymphoid progenitors. Expression of mRNA encoding Zbtb1, a predicted transcription repressor, was greatest in hematopoietic stem cells, thymocytes, and pre-B cells, highlighting its essential role in lymphoid development.
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Laboratory technology for population-based screening for severe combined immunodeficiency in neonates: the winner is T-cell receptor excision circles.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
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The most profound primary immunodeficiency disease, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is fatal in infancy unless affected infants are provided with an adaptive immune system through allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, enzyme replacement, or gene therapy. However, most infants with SCID lack a family history or any clinical clues before the onset of infections, making this serious but treatable disease a candidate for population-based newborn screening. Of several approaches considered for SCID screening, testing for T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), a DNA biomarker of normal T-cell development, has proved successful. TREC numbers can be measured in DNA isolated from the dried bloodspots already routinely collected for newborn screening. Infants with low or absent TRECs can thus be identified and referred for confirmatory testing and prompt intervention. TREC testing of newborns is now being performed in several states, indicating that this addition to the newborn screening panel can be successfully integrated into state public health programs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.