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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Comparison of the serological tests ICT and ELISA for the diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in France?.
Parasite
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2014
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Serological diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a key element for efficient patient treatment management. A rapid immunochromatography test kit (ICT) using the recombinant Em18 antigen (rEm18) was recently developed. The aim of our study was to assess this test on a panel of sera from French patients with alveolar echinococcosis and control patients. In a blind test, a total of 112 serum samples were tested including samples of AE (n = 30), cystic echinococcosis [CE] (n = 15), and polycystic echinococcosis [PE] (n = 1). For the comparison, 66 sera from patients with hepatocarcinoma, fascioliasis, toxocariasis, Caroli's disease, or autoimmune chronic active hepatitis were used. The diagnostic test sets we used were the rEm18-ICT and two validated ELISAs with rEm18 and Em2-Em18 antigens, respectively. For the ICT, 27/30 sera from AE patients, 4/15 sera from CE patients and the PE patient serum were positive. One serum from the control panel (toxocariasis) was positive for the ICT. The rEm18-ICT sensitivity (90.0%) and specificity (92.7%) for detection of Em18-specific antibodies confirmed it as a relevant tool for AE diagnosis. The rEm18-ELISA had a sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 91.5%, and the Em2-Em18-ELISA had a sensitivity of 96.7% and specificity of 87.8%. However, when AE patient sera are recorded as weak in intensity with the ICT, we recommend a double reading and use of a reference sample if the ICT is used for patient follow-up.
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Increased incidence and characteristics of alveolar echinococcosis in patients with immunosuppression-associated conditions.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2014
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An increased incidence of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in patients with immunosuppression (IS) has been observed; our aim was to study this association and its characteristics.
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Real time PCR to detect the environmental faecal contamination by Echinococcus multilocularis from red fox stools.
Vet. Parasitol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2014
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The oncosphere stage of Echinococcus multilocularis in red fox stools can lead, after ingestion, to the development of alveolar echinococcosis in the intermediate hosts, commonly small mammals and occasionally humans. Monitoring animal infection and environmental contamination is a key issue in public health surveillance. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR technique (qPCR) to detect and quantify E. multilocularis DNA released in fox faeces. A qPCR technique using a hydrolysis probe targeting part of the mitochondrial gene rrnL was assessed on (i) a reference collection of stools from 57 necropsied foxes simultaneously investigated using the segmental sedimentation and counting technique (SSCT) (29 positive for E. multilocularis worms and 28 negative animals for the parasite); (ii) a collection of 114 fox stools sampled in the field: two sets of 50 samples from contrasted endemic regions in France and 14 from an E. multilocularis-free area (Greenland). Of the negative SSCT controls, 26/28 were qPCR-negative and two were weakly positive. Of the positive SSCT foxes, 25/29 samples were found to be positive by qPCR. Of the field samples, qPCR was positive in 21/50 (42%) and 5/48 (10.4%) stools (2 samples inhibited), originating respectively from high and low endemic areas. In faeces, averages of 0.1 pg/?l of DNA in the Jura area and 0.7 pg/?l in the Saône-et-Loire area were detected. All qPCR-positive samples were confirmed by sequencing. The qPCR technique developed here allowed us to quantify environmental E. multilocularis contamination by fox faeces by studying the infectious agent directly. No previous study had performed this test in a one-step reaction.
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Glossina palpalis palpalis populations from Equatorial Guinea belong to distinct allopatric clades.
Parasit Vectors
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Luba is one of the four historical foci of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) on Bioko Island, in Equatorial Guinea. Although no human cases have been detected since 1995, T. b. gambiense was recently observed in the vector Glossina palpalis palpalis. The existence of cryptic species within this vector taxon has been previously suggested, although no data are available regarding the evolutionary history of tsetse flies populations in Bioko.
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Detecting nested clusters of human alveolar echinococcosis.
Parasitology
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2013
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Recent changes in the epidemiology of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Eurasia have led to increasing concerns about the risk of human AE and the need for a thorough evaluation of the epidemiological situation. The aim of this study was to explore the use of a National Register to detect complex distribution patterns on several scales. The data were human AE cases from the FrancEchino register, diagnosed in France from 1982 to 2011. We used the Kulldorff spatial scan analysis to detect non-random locations of cases. We proposed an exploratory method that was based on the successive detection of nested clusters inside each of the statistically significant larger clusters. This method revealed at least 4 levels of disease clusters during the study period. The spatial variations of cluster location over time were also shown. We conclude that National Human AE registers, although not exempted from epidemiological biases, are currently the best way to achieve an accurate representation of human AE distribution on various scales. Finally, we confirm the multi-scale clustered distribution of human AE, and we hypothesize that our study may be a reasonable starting point from which to conduct additional research and explore the processes that underlie such distributions.
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Populations at risk for alveolar echinococcosis, France.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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During 1982-2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84-117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21-464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88-18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82-10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups.
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A historical view of alveolar echinococcosis, 160 years after the discovery of the first case in humans: part 1. What have we learnt on the distribution of the disease and on its parasitic agent?
Chin. Med. J.
PUBLISHED: 11-02-2011
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Since the first 2 cases observed in southern Germany and the correct identification of a parasite at the origin of the disease by the famous scientist Rudolf Virchow in 1855, the borders of the endemic area of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) have never stopped to expand. The parasite was successively recognized in Switzerland, then in Russia, Austria and France which were long considered as the only endemic areas for the disease. Cases were disclosed in Turkey in 1939; then much attention was paid to Alaska and to Hokkaido, in Japan. The situation totally changed in 1991 after the recognition of the Chinese endemic areas by the international community of scientists. The world map was completed in the beginning of the 21st century by the identification of AE in most of the countries of central/eastern Europe and Baltic States, and by the recognition of cases in central Asia. Up to now, the disease has however never been reported in the South hemisphere and in the United Kingdom. In the mid-1950s, demonstration by Rausch and Schiller in Alaska, and by Vogel in Germany, of the distinction between 2 parasite species responsible respectively for cystic echinococcosis (“hydatid disease”) and AE put an end to the long-lasting debate between the "dualists", who believed in that theory which eventually proved to be true, and the "unicists", who believed in a single species responsible for both diseases. At the end of the 20th century, molecular biology fully confirmed the "dualist" theory while adding several new species to the initially described E. granulosus; within the past decade, it also confirmed that little variation existed within Echinococcus (E.) multilocularis species, and that AE-looking infection in some intermediate animal hosts on the Tibetan plateau was indeed due to a new species, distinct from E. multilocularis, named E. shiquicus. Since the 1970s, the unique ecological interactions between the landscape, the hosts, and E. multilocularis have progressively been delineated. The important role of the rodent/lagomorph reservoir size for the maintenance of the parasite cycle has been recognized within the last 2 decades of the 20th century. And the discovery of a close relationship between high densities of small mammals and particularities in land use by agriculture/forestry has stressed the responsibility of political/economic decisions on the contamination pressure. Urbanization of foxes in Europe and Japan and the major role of dogs in China represent the new deals at the beginning of the 21st century regarding definitive hosts and prevention measures.
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Phylogenetic relationships within Echinococcus and Taenia tapeworms (Cestoda: Taeniidae): an inference from nuclear protein-coding genes.
Mol. Phylogenet. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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The family Taeniidae of tapeworms is composed of two genera, Echinococcus and Taenia, which obligately parasitize mammals including humans. Inferring phylogeny via molecular markers is the only way to trace back their evolutionary histories. However, molecular dating approaches are lacking so far. Here we established new markers from nuclear protein-coding genes for RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold). Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses of the concatenated gene sequences allowed us to reconstruct phylogenetic trees for taeniid parasites. The tree topologies clearly demonstrated that Taenia is paraphyletic and that the clade of Echinococcus oligarthrus and Echinococcusvogeli is sister to all other members of Echinococcus. Both species are endemic in Central and South America, and their definitive hosts originated from carnivores that immigrated from North America after the formation of the Panamanian land bridge about 3 million years ago (Ma). A time-calibrated phylogeny was estimated by a Bayesian relaxed-clock method based on the assumption that the most recent common ancestor of E. oligarthrus and E. vogeli existed during the late Pliocene (3.0 Ma). The results suggest that a clade of Taenia including human-pathogenic species diversified primarily in the late Miocene (11.2 Ma), whereas Echinococcus started to diversify later, in the end of the Miocene (5.8 Ma). Close genetic relationships among the members of Echinococcus imply that the genus is a young group in which speciation and global radiation occurred rapidly.
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Should possible recurrence of disease contraindicate liver transplantation in patients with end-stage alveolar echinococcosis? A 20-year follow-up study.
Liver Transpl.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2011
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Liver transplantation (LT) is currently contraindicated in patients with residual or metastatic alveolar echinococcosis (AE) lesions. We evaluated the long-term course of such patients who underwent LT and were subsequently treated with benzimidazoles. Clinical, imaging, serological, and therapeutic data were collected from 5 patients with residual/recurrent AE lesions who survived for more than 15 years. Since 2004, [(18) F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) images were available, and the levels of serum antibodies (Abs) against Echinococcus multilocularis-recombinant antigens were evaluated. Median survival time after LT was 21 years. These patients were from a prospective cohort of 23 patients with AE who underwent LT: 5 of 8 patients with residual/recurrent AE and 4 of 9 patients without residual/recurrent AE were alive in September 2009. High doses of immunosuppressive drugs, the late introduction of therapy with benzimidazoles, its withdrawal due to side effects, and nonadherence to this therapy adversely affected the prognosis. Anti-Em2(plus) and anti-rEm18 Ab levels and standard FDG-PET enabled the efficacy of therapy on the growth of EA lesions to be assessed. However, meaningful variations in Ab levels were observed below diagnostic cutoff values; and in monitoring AE lesions, images of FDG uptake taken 3 hours after its injection were more sensitive than images obtained 1 hour after its injection. In conclusion, benzimidazoles can control residual/recurrent AE lesions after LT. Using anti-rEm18 or anti-Em2(plus) Ab levels and the delayed acquisition of FDG-PET images can improve the functional assessment of disease activity. The potential recurrence of disease, especially in patients with residual or metastatic AE lesions, should not be regarded as a contraindication to LT when AE is considered to be lethal in the short term.
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State-of-the-art Echinococcus and Taenia: phylogenetic taxonomy of human-pathogenic tapeworms and its application to molecular diagnosis.
Infect. Genet. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2010
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The taxonomy of tapeworms belonging to the family Taeniidae has been controversial because of the paucity of adult phenotypic characters and the great plasticity of larvae in intermediate hosts. The family consists of the medically important two genera Echinococcus and Taenia, which are closely related to each other. Cladistic approaches using the molecular data of DNA and the numerical data of morphologic characters are clarifying phylogenetic relationships among the members of these genera. The nucleotide data of worldwide taeniid parasites accumulated in public DNA databases may provide a basis for the development of molecular diagnostic tools, and make it possible to identify the parasites, at least the human Taenia spp. by non-morphologists. Furthermore, the detection of intraspecific genetic variations prompts evolutionary and ecological studies to address fundamental questions of parasite distributional patterns. Here, we introduce the recent advances of taeniid phylogeny and its application to molecular diagnosis.
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Serological studies of neurologic helminthic infections in rural areas of southwest cameroon: toxocariasis, cysticercosis and paragonimiasis.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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Both epilepsy and paragonimiasis had been known to be endemic in Southwest Cameroon. A total of 188 people (168 and 20 with and without symptoms confirmed by clinicians, respectively, 84.6% under 20 years old) were selected on a voluntary basis. Among 14 people (8.3%) with history of epilepsy, only one suffered from paragonimiasis. Therefore, we challenged to check antibody responses to highly specific diagnostic recombinant antigens for two other helminthic diseases, cysticercosis and toxocariasis, expected to be involved in neurological diseases. Soil-transmitted helminthic infections were also examined.
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Echinococcus vogeli infection in a hunter, French Guiana.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2009
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Echinococcus vogeli infection in a hunter from the rain forest of French Guiana was confirmed by imaging and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis. Serologic examination showed typical patterns for both alveolar and cystic echinococcosis. Polycystic echinococcis caused by E. vogeli may be an emerging parasitic disease in Central and South America.
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Genetic diversity of the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis in red foxes at a continental scale in Europe.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2009
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Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a severe helminth disease affecting humans, which is caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. AE represents a serious public health issue in larger regions of China, Siberia, and other regions in Asia. In Europe, a significant increase in prevalence since the 1990s is not only affecting the historically documented endemic area north of the Alps but more recently also neighbouring regions previously not known to be endemic. The genetic diversity of the parasite population and respective distribution in Europe have now been investigated in view of generating a fine-tuned map of parasite variants occurring in Europe. This approach may serve as a model to study the parasite at a worldwide level.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.