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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A forward-imaging needle-type OCT probe for image guided stereotactic procedures.
Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2011
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A forward-imaging needle-type optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe with Doppler OCT (DOCT) capability has the potential to solve critical challenges in interventional procedures. A case in point is stereotactic neurosurgery where probes are advanced into the brain based on predetermined coordinates. Laceration of blood vessels in front of the advancing probe is an unavoidable complication with current methods. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery can shift the brain rendering the predetermined coordinates unreliable. In order to address these challenges, we developed a forward-imaging OCT probe (740 ?m O.D.) using a gradient-index (GRIN) rod lens that can provide real-time imaging feedback for avoiding at-risk vessels (8 frames/s with 1024 A-scans per frame for OCT/DOCT dual imaging) and guiding the instrument to specific targets with 12 ?m axial resolution (100 frames/s with 160 A-scans per frame for OCT imaging only). The high signal-to-background characteristic of DOCT provides exceptional sensitivity in detecting and quantifying the blood flow within the sheep brain parenchyma in real time. The OCT/DOCT dual imaging also demonstrated its capability to differentiate the vessel type (artery/vein) on rats femoral vessels. We also demonstrated in ex vivo human brain that the location of the tip of the OCT probe can be inferred from micro-anatomical landmarks in OCT images. These findings demonstrate the suitability of OCT guidance during stereotactic procedures in the brain and its potential for reducing the risk of cerebral hemorrhage.
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In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of kidney microcirculation using Doppler optical coherence tomography.
Lab. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2011
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Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is a functional extension of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and is currently being employed in several clinical arenas to quantify blood flow in vivo. In this study, the objective was to investigate the feasibility of DOCT to image kidney microcirculation, specifically, glomerular blood flow. DOCT is able to capture three-dimensional (3D) data sets consisting of a series of cross-sectional images in real time, which enables label-free and non-destructive quantification of glomerular blood flow. The kidneys of adult, male Munich-Wistar rats were exposed through laparotomy procedure after being anesthetized. Following exposure of the kidney beneath the DOCT microscope, glomerular blood flow was observed. The effects of acute mannitol and angiotensin II infusion were also observed. Glomerular blood flow was quantified for the induced physiological states and compared with baseline measurements. Glomerular volume, cumulative Doppler volume, and Doppler flow range parameters were computed from 3D OCT/DOCT data sets. Glomerular size was determined from OCT, and DOCT readily revealed glomerular blood flow. After infusion of mannitol, a significant increase in blood flow was observed and quantified, and following infusion of angiontensin II, a significant decrease in blood flow was observed and quantified. Also, blood flow histograms were produced to illustrate differences in blood flow rate and blood volume among the induced physiological states. We demonstrated 3D DOCT imaging of rat kidney microcirculation in the glomerulus in vivo. Dynamic changes in blood flow were detected under altered physiological conditions demonstrating the real-time imaging capability of DOCT. This method holds promise to allow non-invasive imaging of kidney blood flow for transplant graft evaluation or monitoring of altered-renal hemodynamics related to disease progression.
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Rh-I-UEA-1 polymerized liposomes target and image adenomatous polyps in the APC(Min/+) mouse using optical colonography.
Mol Imaging
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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Mutated adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) genes predispose transformations to neoplasia, progressing to colorectal carcinoma. Early detection facilitates clinical management and therapy. Novel lectin-mediated polymerized targeted liposomes (Rh-I-UEA-1), with polyp specificity and incorporated imaging agents were fabricated to locate and image adenomatous polyps in APC(Min/+) mice. The biomarker ?-L-fucose covalently joins the liposomal conjugated lectin Ulexeuropaeus agglutinin (UEA-1), via glycosidic linkage to the polyp mucin layer. Multispectral optical imaging (MSI) corroborated a global perspective of specific binding (rhodamine B 532 nm emission, 590-620 nm excitation) of targeted Rh-I-UEA-1 polymerized liposomes to polyps with 1.4-fold labeling efficiency. High-resolution coregistered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) reveal the spatial correlation of contrast distribution and tissue morphology. Freshly excised APC(Min) bowels were incubated with targeted liposomes (UEA-1 lectin), control liposomes (no lectin), or iohexol (Omnipaque) and imaged by the three techniques. Computed tomographic quantitative analyses did not confirm that targeted liposomes more strongly bound polyps than nontargeted liposomes or iohexol (Omnipaque) alone. OCT, with anatomic depth capabilities, along with the coregistered FMI, substantiated Rh-I-UEA-1 liposome binding along the mucinous polyp surface. UEA-1 lectin denotes ?-l-fucose biomarker carbohydrate expression at the mucin glycoprotein layer; Rh-I-UEA-1 polymerized liposomes target and image adenomatous polyps in APC(Min) mice.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.