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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mammalian models for the study of h7 virus pathogenesis and transmission.
Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2014
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Mammalian models, most notably the mouse and ferret, have been instrumental in the assessment of avian influenza virus pathogenicity and transmissibility, and have been used widely to characterize the molecular determinants that confer H5N1 virulence in mammals. However, while H7 influenza viruses have typically been associated with conjunctivitis and/or mild respiratory disease in humans, severe disease and death is also possible, as underscored by the recent emergence of H7N9 viruses in China. Despite the public health need to understand the pandemic potential of this virus subtype, H7 virus pathogenesis and transmission has not been as extensively studied. In this review, we discuss the heterogeneity of H7 subtype viruses isolated from humans, and the characterization of mammalian models to study the virulence of H7 subtype viruses associated with human infection, including viruses of both high and low pathogenicity and following multiple inoculation routes. The use of the ferret transmission model to assess the influence of receptor binding preference among contemporary H7 influenza viruses is described. These models have enabled the study of preventative and therapeutic agents, including vaccines and antivirals, to reduce disease burden, and have permitted a greater appreciation that not all highly pathogenic influenza viruses are created equal.
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H7N9 and other pathogenic avian influenza viruses elicit a three-pronged transcriptomic signature that is reminiscent of 1918 influenza virus and is associated with lethal outcome in mice.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2014
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Modulating the host response is a promising approach to treating influenza, caused by a virus whose pathogenesis is determined in part by the reaction it elicits within the host. Though the pathogenicity of emerging H7N9 influenza virus in several animal models has been reported, these studies have not included a detailed characterization of the host response following infection. Therefore, we characterized the transcriptomic response of BALB/c mice infected with H7N9 (A/Anhui/01/2013) virus and compared it to the responses induced by H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/2004), H7N7 (A/Netherlands/219/2003), and pandemic 2009 H1N1 (A/Mexico/4482/2009) influenza viruses. We found that responses to the H7 subtype viruses were intermediate to those elicited by H5N1 and pdm09H1N1 early in infection but that they evolved to resemble the H5N1 response as infection progressed. H5N1, H7N7, and H7N9 viruses were pathogenic in mice, and this pathogenicity correlated with increased transcription of cytokine response genes and decreased transcription of lipid metabolism and coagulation signaling genes. This three-pronged transcriptomic signature was observed in mice infected with pathogenic H1N1 strains such as the 1918 virus, indicating that it may be predictive of pathogenicity across multiple influenza virus strains. Finally, we used host transcriptomic profiling to computationally predict drugs that reverse the host response to H7N9 infection, and we identified six FDA-approved drugs that could potentially be repurposed to treat H7N9 and other pathogenic influenza viruses.
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Influenza virus infectivity and virulence following ocular-only aerosol inoculation of ferrets.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2014
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Respiratory pathogens have traditionally been studied by examining the exposure and infection of respiratory tract tissues. However, these studies typically overlook the role of ocular surfaces, which represent both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of entry for the establishment of a respiratory infection. To model transocular virus entry in a mammalian species, we established a novel inoculation method that delivers an aerosol inoculum exclusively to the ferret ocular surface. Using influenza virus as a representative respiratory pathogen, we found that both human and avian viruses mounted productive respiratory infections in ferrets following ocular-only aerosol inoculation, and we demonstrated that H5N1 virus can result in a fatal infection at doses below 10 PFU or with exposure times as short as 2 min. Ferrets inoculated by the ocular aerosol route with an avian (H7N7, H7N9) or human (H1N1, H3N2v) virus were capable of transmitting the virus to naïve animals in direct-contact or respiratory-droplet models, respectively. Our results reveal that ocular-only exposure to virus-containing aerosols constitutes a valid exposure route for a potentially fatal respiratory infection, even for viruses that do not demonstrate an ocular tropism, underscoring the public health implications of ocular exposure in clinical or occupational settings.
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N3) virus in poultry workers, Mexico, 2012.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2013
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We identified 2 poultry workers with conjunctivitis caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N3) viruses in Jalisco, Mexico. Genomic and antigenic analyses of 1 isolate indicated relatedness to poultry and wild bird subtype H7N3 viruses from North America. This isolate had a multibasic cleavage site that might have been derived from recombination with host rRNA.
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Considerations regarding appropriate sample size for conducting ferret transmission experiments.
Future Microbiol
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2013
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Evaluation of: Nishiura H, Yen H-L, Cowling BJ. Sample size considerations for one-to-one animal transmission studies of the influenza A viruses. PLoS ONE 8(1), e55358 (2013). There is an urgent need to model in a laboratory setting the capacity of wild-type influenza viruses to transmit between mammals, to determine the molecular determinants and identify biological properties that confer influenza virus transmissibility, and to explore both pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical methods to inhibit virus transmission. Owing to its close physiologic match to humans, researchers typically utilize the ferret to measure influenza virus transmissibility. Nishiura et al. highlight the dilemma facing researchers utilizing the ferret transmission model: how to provide high-quality data to guide public health efforts, while ensuring the ethical use of animals in limited-size, individual, one-to-one transmission experiments. However, the responsible interpretation of data generated using this model can overcome this potential limitation. A closer examination of previously published studies utilizing this model as it is currently employed reveals that the sample size of these studies is not always as small as it may appear.
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Zanamivir Conjugated to Poly-L-Glutamine is Much More Active Against Influenza Viruses in Mice and Ferrets Than the Drug Itself.
Pharm. Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-05-2013
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Previously, polymer-attached zanamivir had been found to inhibit influenza A viruses in vitro far better than did small-molecule zanamivir (1) itself. The aim of this study was to identify in vitro-using the plaque reduction assay-a highly potent 1-polymer conjugate, and subsequently test its antiviral efficacy in vivo.
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Pathogenesis and transmission of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in ferrets and mice.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2013
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On 29 March 2013, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first reported case of human infection with an avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. The recent human infections with H7N9 virus, totalling over 130 cases with 39 fatalities to date, have been characterized by severe pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This is concerning because H7 viruses have typically been associated with ocular disease in humans, rather than severe respiratory disease. This recent outbreak underscores the need to better understand the pathogenesis and transmission of these viruses in mammals. Here we assess the ability of A/Anhui/1/2013 and A/Shanghai/1/2013 (H7N9) viruses, isolated from fatal human cases, to cause disease in mice and ferrets and to transmit to naive animals. Both H7N9 viruses replicated to higher titre in human airway epithelial cells and in the respiratory tract of ferrets compared to a seasonal H3N2 virus. Moreover, the H7N9 viruses showed greater infectivity and lethality in mice compared to genetically related H7N9 and H9N2 viruses. The H7N9 viruses were readily transmitted to naive ferrets through direct contact but, unlike the seasonal H3N2 virus, did not transmit readily by respiratory droplets. The lack of efficient respiratory droplet transmission was corroborated by low receptor-binding specificity for human-like ?2,6-linked sialosides. Our results indicate that H7N9 viruses have the capacity for efficient replication in mammals and human airway cells and highlight the need for continued public health surveillance of this emerging virus.
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Pathogenesis, transmissibility, and ocular tropism of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N3) virus associated with human conjunctivitis.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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H7 subtype influenza A viruses, responsible for numerous outbreaks in land-based poultry in Europe and the Americas, have caused over 100 cases of confirmed or presumed human infection over the last decade. The emergence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza H7N3 virus in poultry throughout the state of Jalisco, Mexico, resulting in two cases of human infection, prompted us to examine the virulence of this virus (A/Mexico/InDRE7218/2012 [MX/7218]) and related avian H7 subtype viruses in mouse and ferret models. Several high- and low-pathogenicity H7N3 and H7N9 viruses replicated efficiently in the respiratory tract of mice without prior adaptation following intranasal inoculation, but only MX/7218 virus caused lethal disease in this species. H7N3 and H7N9 viruses were also detected in the mouse eye following ocular inoculation. Virus from both H7N3 and H7N9 subtypes replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of ferrets; however, only MX/7218 virus infection caused clinical signs and symptoms and was capable of transmission to naive ferrets in a direct-contact model. Similar to other highly pathogenic H7 viruses, MX/7218 replicated to high titers in human bronchial epithelial cells, yet it downregulated numerous genes related to NF-?B-mediated signaling transduction. These findings indicate that the recently isolated North American lineage H7 subtype virus associated with human conjunctivitis is capable of causing severe disease in mice and spreading to naive-contact ferrets, while concurrently retaining the ability to replicate within ocular tissue and allowing the eye to serve as a portal of entry.
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Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.
Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2013
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Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.
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Human antibodies that neutralize respiratory droplet transmissible H5N1 influenza viruses.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Recent studies described the experimental adaptation of influenza H5 HAs that confers respiratory droplet transmission (rdt) to influenza virus in ferrets. Acquisition of the ability to transmit via aerosol may lead to the development of a highly pathogenic pandemic H5 virus. Vaccines are predicted to play an important role in H5N1 control should the virus become readily transmissible between humans. We obtained PBMCs from patients who received an A/Vietnam/1203/2004 H5N1 subunit vaccine. Human hybridomas were then generated and characterized. We identified antibodies that bound the HA head domain and recognized both WT and rdt H5 HAs. We used a combination of structural techniques to define a mechanism of antibody recognition of an H5 HA receptor-binding site that neutralized H5N1 influenza viruses and pseudoviruses carrying the HA rdt variants that have mutations near the receptor-binding site. Incorporation or retention of this critical antigenic site should be considered in the design of novel H5 HA immunogens to protect against mammalian-adapted H5N1 mutants.
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Inducible nitric oxide contributes to viral pathogenesis following highly pathogenic influenza virus infection in mice.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, including avian H5N1 viruses and the 1918 pandemic virus, cause severe respiratory disease in humans and animals. Virus infection is followed by intense pulmonary congestion due to an extensive influx of macrophages and neutrophils, which can release large quantities of reactive oxygen species potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of lung disease. Here, the role of nitric oxide (NO), a potent signaling molecule in inflammation, was evaluated following highly pathogenic influenza virus challenge in mice. We observed higher levels of NO in mice infected with H5N1 and 1918 viruses as compared to a seasonal H1N1 virus. Mice deficient in inducible NO synthase (NOS2(-/-)) exhibited reduced morbidity, reduced mortality, and diminished cytokine production in lung tissue following H5N1 and 1918-virus challenge, compared with wild-type control mice. Furthermore, systemic treatment of mice with the NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine delayed weight loss and death among 1918 virus infected mice compared to untreated control animals. This study demonstrates that NO contributes to the pathogenic outcome of H5N1 and 1918 viral infections in the mouse model.
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H5N1 pathogenesis studies in mammalian models.
Virus Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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H5N1 influenza viruses are capable of causing severe disease and death in humans, and represent a potential pandemic subtype should they acquire a transmissible phenotype. Due to the expanding host and geographic range of this virus subtype, there is an urgent need to better understand the contribution of both virus and host responses following H5N1 virus infection to prevent and control human disease. The use of mammalian models, notably the mouse and ferret, has enabled the detailed study of both complex virus-host interactions as well as the contribution of individual viral proteins and point mutations which influence virulence. In this review, we describe the behavior of H5N1 viruses which exhibit high and low virulence in numerous mammalian species, and highlight the contribution of inoculation route to virus pathogenicity. The involvement of host responses as studied in both inbred and outbred mammalian models is discussed. The roles of individual viral gene products and molecular determinants which modulate the severity of H5N1 disease in vivo are presented. This research contributes not only to our understanding of influenza virus pathogenesis, but also identifies novel preventative and therapeutic targets to mitigate the disease burden caused by avian influenza viruses.
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Simvastatin and oseltamivir combination therapy does not improve the effectiveness of oseltamivir alone following highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus infection in mice.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2013
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Nonspecific anti-inflammatory drugs have been purported to reduce the burden of severe influenza disease. We demonstrate that, unlike oseltamivir administration, simvastatin administration did not reduce morbidity, mortality, or viral load of mice infected with H1N1 or H5N1 viruses. No added benefit to the efficacy of oseltamivir therapy was observed when mice were treated in combination with simvastatin. Modest reductions in lung cytokine production in H5N1 but not H1N1 virus-infected simvastatin-treated mice indicate a potential benefit for statin use in mitigating disease following severe virus infection.
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Kinetics of viral replication and induction of host responses in ferrets differs between ocular and intranasal routes of inoculation.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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While influenza viruses are typically considered respiratory pathogens, the ocular system represents a secondary entry point for virus to establish a productive respiratory infection and the location for rare instances of virus-induced conjunctivitis. We used the ferret model to conduct a side-by-side comparison of virus infectivity, kinetics of viral replication, and induction of host responses following inoculation by either the intranasal or ocular routes with two viruses, A/Netherlands/230/03 (H7N7) and A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2). We show that ocular inoculation resulted in delayed virus replication and reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine transcript in respiratory tract but not ocular tissues compared with intranasally inoculated animals. We identified numerous proinflammatory mediators with known roles in ocular disease elicited in ferret eye tissue following influenza virus infection. These findings provide a greater understanding of the modulation of host responses following different inoculation routes and underscore the risk associated with ocular exposure to influenza viruses.
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Oseltamivir inhibits H7 influenza virus replication in mice inoculated by the ocular route.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 12-12-2011
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The majority of human infections associated with H7 influenza viruses have resulted in ocular and not respiratory disease. While oseltamivir has been prescribed to individuals presenting with conjunctivitis following H7 virus exposure, it is unknown if oseltamivir inhibits virus replication in ocular tissue. We demonstrate that H7 viruses possess sensitivity to neuraminidase inhibitors and that administration of oseltamivir before ocular virus challenge in mice inhibits H7N7 and H7N3 virus replication in ocular and respiratory tissues.
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Local innate immune responses and influenza virus transmission and virulence in ferrets.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2011
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Host innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens, including influenza viruses. Ferrets are well recognized as the best model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission, but little is known about the innate immune response of ferrets after infection with this virus. The goal of this study was to investigate the contribution of localized host responses to influenza virus pathogenicity and transmissibility in this model by measuring the level of messenger RNA expression of 12 cytokines and chemokines in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of ferrets infected with H5N1, H1N1, or H3N2 influenza viruses that exhibit diverse virulence and transmissibility in ferrets. We found a strong temporal correlation between inflammatory mediators and the kinetics and frequency of transmission, clinical signs associated with transmission, peak virus shedding, and virulence. Our findings point to a link between localized innate immunity and influenza virus transmission and disease progression.
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Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells support productive replication of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses: possible involvement in the pathogenesis of human H5N1 virus infection.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2011
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to cause sporadic human infections with a high fatality rate. Respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complication among hospitalized patients. Since progressive pulmonary endothelial damage is the hallmark of ARDS, we investigated host responses following HPAI virus infection of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. Evaluation of these cells for the presence of receptors preferred by influenza virus demonstrated that avian-like (?2-3-linked) receptors were more abundant than human-like (?2-6-linked) receptors. To test the permissiveness of pulmonary endothelial cells to virus infection, we compared the replication of selected seasonal, pandemic (2009 H1N1 and 1918), and potentially pandemic (H5N1) influenza virus strains. We observed that these cells support productive replication only of HPAI H5N1 viruses, which preferentially enter through and are released from the apical surface of polarized human endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, A/Thailand/16/2004 and A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN/1203) H5N1 viruses, which exhibit heightened virulence in mammalian models, replicated to higher titers than less virulent H5N1 strains. VN/1203 infection caused a significant decrease in endothelial cell proliferation compared to other subtype viruses. VN/1203 virus was also found to be a potent inducer of cytokines and adhesion molecules known to regulate inflammation during acute lung injury. Deletion of the H5 hemagglutinin (HA) multibasic cleavage site did not affect virus infectivity but resulted in decreased virus replication in endothelial cells. Our results highlight remarkable tropism and infectivity of the H5N1 viruses for human pulmonary endothelial cells, resulting in the potent induction of host inflammatory responses.
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Comparative immunogenicity and cross-clade protective efficacy of mammalian cell-grown inactivated and live attenuated H5N1 reassortant vaccines in ferrets.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2011
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Continued H5N1 virus infection in humans highlights the need for vaccine strategies that provide cross-clade protection against this rapidly evolving virus. We report a comparative evaluation in ferrets of the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of isogenic mammalian cell-grown, live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) and adjuvanted, whole-virus, inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV), produced from a clade 1 H5N1 6:2 reassortant vaccine candidate (caVN1203-Len17rg) based on the cold-adapted A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) master donor virus. Two doses of LAIV or IIV provided complete protection against lethal homologous H5N1 virus challenge and a reduction in virus shedding and disease severity after heterologous clade 2.2.1 H5N1 virus challenge and increased virus-specific serum and nasal wash antibody levels. Although both vaccines demonstrated cross-protective efficacy, LAIV induced higher levels of nasal wash IgA and reduction of heterologous virus shedding, compared with IIV. Thus, enhanced respiratory tract antibody responses elicited by LAIV were associated with improved cross-clade protection.
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The ferret as a model organism to study influenza A virus infection.
Dis Model Mech
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2011
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Influenza is a human pathogen that continues to pose a public health threat. The use of small mammalian models has become indispensable for understanding the virulence of influenza viruses. Among numerous species used in the laboratory setting, only the ferret model is equally well suited for studying both the pathogenicity and transmissibility of human and avian influenza viruses. Here, we compare the advantages and limitations of the mouse, ferret and guinea pig models for research with influenza A viruses, emphasizing the multifarious uses of the ferret in the assessment of influenza viruses with pandemic potential. Research performed in the ferret model has provided information, support and guidance for the public health response to influenza viruses in humans. We highlight the recent and emerging uses of this species in influenza virus research that are advancing our understanding of virus-host interactions.
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Cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of a pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 vaccine in mice.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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The development of pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 vaccines that confer both antigen-sparing and cross-clade protection are a high priority given the limited worldwide capacity for influenza vaccine production, and the antigenic and genetic heterogeneity of circulating H5N1 viruses. The inclusion of potent adjuvants in vaccine formulations may achieve both of these aims. Here we show that the addition of JVRS-100, an adjuvant consisting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) to a clade 1-derived H5N1 split vaccine induced significantly higher virus-specific antibody than unadjuvanted formulations, with a >30-fold dose-sparing effect and induction of increased antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in mice. All mice that received one dose of adjuvanted vaccine and subsequent H5N1 viral challenges exhibited mild illness, lower lung viral titers, undetectable spleen and brain viral titers, and 100% survival after either homologous clade 1 or heterologous clade 2 H5N1 viral challenges, whereas unadjuvanted vaccine recipients showed significantly increased weight loss, viral titers, and mortality. The protective immunity induced by JVRS-100 adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine was shown to last for over one year without significant waning. Thus, JVRS-100 adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine elicited enhanced humoral and T-cell responses, dose-sparing, and cross-clade protection in mice. CLDC holds promise as an adjuvant for human pre-pandemic inactivated H5N1 vaccines.
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Ocular tropism of influenza A viruses: identification of H7 subtype-specific host responses in human respiratory and ocular cells.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2011
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H7 virus infection in humans frequently results in conjunctivitis as a major symptom. However, our understanding of what properties govern virus subtype-specific tropism, and of the host responses responsible for eliciting ocular inflammation and pathogenicity following influenza virus infection, are not well understood. To study virus-host interactions in ocular tissue, we infected primary human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells with H7, H5, and H1 subtype viruses. We found that numerous virus subtypes were capable of infecting and replicating in multiple human ocular cell types, with the highest titers observed with highly pathogenic H7N7 and H5N1 viruses. Similar patterns of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production following influenza virus infection were observed in ocular and respiratory cells. However, primary ocular cells infected with HPAI H7N7 viruses were found to have elevated levels of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), a cytokine previously implicated in ocular disease pathology. Furthermore, H7N7 virus infection of corneal epithelial cells resulted in enhanced and significant increases in the expression of genes related to NF-?B signal transduction compared with that after H5N1 or H1N1 virus infection. The differential induction of cytokines and signaling pathways in human ocular cells following H7 virus infection marks the first association of H7 subtype-specific host responses with ocular tropism and pathogenicity. In particular, heightened expression of genes related to NF-?B-mediated signaling transduction following HPAI H7N7 virus infection in primary corneal epithelial cells, but not respiratory cells, identifies activation of a signaling pathway that correlates with the ocular tropism of influenza viruses within this subtype.
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Effect of D222G mutation in the hemagglutinin protein on receptor binding, pathogenesis and transmissibility of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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Influenza viruses isolated during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic generally lack known molecular determinants of virulence associated with previous pandemic and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The frequency of the amino acid substitution D222G in the hemagglutinin (HA) of 2009 H1N1 viruses isolated from severe but not mild human cases represents the first molecular marker associated with enhanced disease. To assess the relative contribution of this substitution in virus pathogenesis, transmission, and tropism, we introduced D222G by reverse genetics in the wild-type HA of the 2009 H1N1 virus, A/California/04/09 (CA/04). A dose-dependent glycan array analysis with the D222G virus showed a modest reduction in the binding avidity to human-like (?2-6 sialylated glycan) receptors and an increase in the binding to avian-like (?2-3 sialylated glycan) receptors in comparison with wild-type virus. In the ferret pathogenesis model, the D222G mutant virus was found to be similar to wild-type CA/04 virus with respect to lethargy, weight loss and replication efficiency in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Moreover, based on viral detection, the respiratory droplet transmission properties of these two viruses were found to be similar. The D222G virus failed to productively infect mice inoculated by the ocular route, but exhibited greater viral replication and weight loss than wild-type CA/04 virus in mice inoculated by the intranasal route. In a more relevant human cell model, D222G virus replicated with delayed kinetics compared with wild-type virus but to higher titer in human bronchial epithelial cells. These findings suggest that although the D222G mutation does not influence virus transmission, it may be considered a molecular marker for enhanced replication in certain cell types.
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Influenza virus aerosol exposure and analytical system for ferrets.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2011
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Understanding the transmission ability of newly emerging influenza viruses is central to the development of public health preparedness and prevention strategies. Animals are used to model influenza virus infection and transmission, but the routinely used intranasal inoculation of a liquid virus suspension does not reflect natural infection. We report the development of an inoculation method that delivers an influenza virus aerosol inoculum to ferrets and the characterization of size distribution and viable virus present in aerosols shed from infected ferrets during normal breathing and sneezing. By comparing virus deposition, infectivity, virulence, and transmissibility among animals inoculated intranasally or by aerosols with a human (H3N2) or avian (H5N1) influenza virus, we demonstrate that aerosol inoculations more closely resemble a natural, airborne influenza virus infection and that viable virus is measurable in droplets and droplet nuclei exhaled by infected ferrets. These methods will provide improved risk assessment of emerging influenza viruses that pose a threat to public health.
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Influenza virus-like particle can accommodate multiple subtypes of hemagglutinin and protect from multiple influenza types and subtypes.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2011
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Despite existing vaccines and specific therapies, epidemics of seasonal influenza annually claim 200,000-500,000 lives worldwide. Pandemic influenza represents an even greater threat, with numerous potentially pandemic viruses circulating in nature. Development of multi-specific vaccines against multiple pandemic or seasonal strains is important for human health and the global economy. Here we report a novel virus-like particle (VLP) platform that contains three hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. This recombinant vaccine design resulted in the expression of three HA subtypes co-localized within a VLP. Experimental triple-HA VLPs containing HA proteins derived from H5N1, H7N2, and H2N3 viruses were immunogenic and protected ferrets from challenge from all three potentially pandemic viruses. Similarly, VLPs containing HA subtypes derived from seasonal H1N1, H3N2, and type B influenza viruses protected ferrets from three seasonal influenza viruses. We conclude that this technology may represent a novel strategy for rapid development of trivalent seasonal and pandemic vaccines.
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Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced receptor binding domain mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of two H5N1 viruses and evaluated changes in receptor binding specificity by glycan microarray analysis. The impact of these mutations on replication efficiency was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Although certain mutations switched the receptor binding preference of the H5 HA, the rescued mutant viruses displayed reduced replication in vitro and delayed peak virus shedding in ferrets. An improvement in transmission efficiency was not observed with any of the mutants compared to the parental viruses, indicating that alternative molecular changes are required for H5N1 viruses to fully adapt to humans and to acquire pandemic capability.
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A single base-pair change in 2009 H1N1 hemagglutinin increases human receptor affinity and leads to efficient airborne viral transmission in ferrets.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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The 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus continues to circulate among the human population as the predominant H1N1 subtype. Epidemiological studies and airborne transmission studies using the ferret model have shown that the transmission efficiency of 2009 H1N1 viruses is lower than that of previous seasonal strains and the 1918 pandemic H1N1 strain. We recently correlated this reduced transmission efficiency to the lower binding affinity of the 2009 H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA) to ?2?6 sialylated glycan receptors (human receptors). Here we report that a single point mutation (Ile219?Lys; a base pair change) in the glycan receptor-binding site (RBS) of a representative 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus, A/California/04/09 or CA04/09, quantitatively increases its human receptor-binding affinity. The increased human receptor-affinity is in the same range as that of the HA from highly transmissible seasonal and 1918 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Moreover, a 2009 H1N1 virus carrying this mutation in the RBS (generated using reverse genetics) transmits efficiently in ferrets by respiratory droplets thereby reestablishing our previously observed correlation between human receptor-binding affinity and transmission efficiency. These findings are significant in the context of monitoring the evolution of the currently circulating 2009 H1N1 viruses.
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Efficacy of seasonal live attenuated influenza vaccine against virus replication and transmission of a pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus in ferrets.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2011
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In March 2009, a swine origin influenza A (2009 H1N1) virus was introduced into the human population and quickly spread from North America to multiple continents. Human serologic studies suggest that seasonal influenza virus vaccination or infection would provide little cross-reactive serologic immunity to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. However, the efficacy of seasonal influenza infection or vaccination against 2009 H1N1 virus replication and transmission has not been adequately evaluated in vivo. Here, ferrets received one or two doses of the US licensed 2008-2009 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) intranasally. An additional group of ferrets were inoculated with the A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) virus to model immunity induced by seasonal influenza virus infection. All vaccinated and infected animals possessed high titer homologous hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and neutralizing antibodies, with no demonstrable cross-reactive antibodies against 2009 H1N1 virus. However, in comparison to non-immune controls, immunized ferrets challenged with pandemic A/Mexico/4482/09 virus displayed a significant reduction in body temperature and virus shedding. The impact of single-dose LAIV inoculation on 2009 H1N1 disease and virus transmission was also measured in vaccinated ferrets that were challenged with pandemic A/Netherlands/1132/09 virus. Although a single dose of LAIV reduced virus shedding and the frequency of transmission following homologous seasonal virus challenge, it failed to reduce respiratory droplet transmission of 2009 H1N1 virus. The results demonstrate that prior immunization with seasonal LAIV or H1N1 virus infection provides some cross-protection against the 2009 H1N1 virus, but had no significant effect on the transmission efficiency of the 2009 H1N1 virus.
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Multiple genes contribute to the virulent phenotype observed in ferrets of an H5N1 influenza virus isolated from Thailand in 2004.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Human infections with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses continue to occur in many parts of the world and pose a considerable public health threat. With the use of animal models, the identification of virulence determinants has been instrumental in improving our understanding of how these viruses cause severe disease in humans. Two genetically similar H5N1 viruses (A/Thailand/16/2004 and A/Thailand/SP83/2004) exhibit high or low virulence phenotypes, respectively, in multiple animal models. Reassortant viruses were generated from this virus pair and evaluated in ferrets. Each of the polymerase genes of A/Thailand/16/2004 virus individually conferred increased virulence to A/Thailand/SP83/2004 virus while the neuraminidase of the low virulence virus reduced virulence and replication efficiency of the virulent virus in ferrets unless the homologous HA was present. Our results demonstrate that H5N1 virus virulence determinants are polygenic and that there is an important correlation between polymerase adaptation, efficient replication in the host, and virulence.
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Infection with highly pathogenic H7 influenza viruses results in an attenuated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine response early after infection.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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Avian influenza A viruses of the H7 subtype have resulted in more than 100 cases of human infection since 2002. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H7 viruses have the capacity to cause severe respiratory disease and even death; however, the induction of the human innate immune response to H7 virus infection has not been well characterized. To better understand H7 virus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract, we employed a polarized human bronchial epithelial cell model and primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. Here, we show that infection with HPAI H7 viruses resulted in a delayed and weakened production of cytokines, including the type I interferon response, compared with infections of other influenza A subtypes, including H7 viruses of low pathogenicity. These studies revealed that H7 viruses vary greatly in their ability to activate host innate responses and may contribute to the virulence of these viruses observed in humans.
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The development of vaccine viruses against pandemic A(H1N1) influenza.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Wild type human influenza viruses do not usually grow well in embryonated hens eggs, the substrate of choice for the production of inactivated influenza vaccine, and vaccine viruses need to be developed specifically for this purpose. In the event of a pandemic of influenza, vaccine viruses need to be created with utmost speed. At the onset of the current A(H1N1) pandemic in April 2009, a network of laboratories began a race against time to develop suitable candidate vaccine viruses. Two approaches were followed, the classical reassortment approach and the more recent reverse genetics approach. This report describes the development and the characteristics of current pandemic H1N1 candidate vaccine viruses.
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Influenza A virus transmission: contributing factors and clinical implications.
Expert Rev Mol Med
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2010
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Efficient human-to-human transmission is a necessary property for the generation of a pandemic influenza virus. To date, only influenza A viruses within the H1-H3 subtypes have achieved this capacity. However, sporadic cases of severe disease in individuals following infection with avian influenza A viruses over the past decade, and the emergence of a pandemic H1N1 swine-origin virus in 2009, underscore the need to better understand how influenza viruses acquire the ability to transmit efficiently. In this review, we discuss the biological constraints and molecular features known to affect virus transmissibility to and among humans. Factors influencing the behaviour of aerosols in the environment are described, and the mammalian models used to study virus transmission are presented. Recent progress in understanding the molecular determinants that confer efficient transmission has identified crucial roles for the haemagglutinin and polymerase proteins; nevertheless, influenza virus transmission remains a polygenic trait that is not completely understood. The clinical implications of this research, including methods currently under investigation to mitigate influenza virus human-to-human transmission, are discussed. A better understanding of the viral determinants necessary for efficient transmission will allow us to identify avian influenza viruses with pandemic potential.
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Pathogenesis and transmission of triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses isolated before the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2010
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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus represents the greatest incidence of human infection with an influenza virus of swine origin to date. Moreover, triple-reassortant swine (TRS) H1N1 viruses, which share similar host and lineage origins with 2009 H1N1 viruses, have been responsible for sporadic human cases since 2005. Similar to 2009 H1N1 viruses, TRS viruses are capable of causing severe disease in previously healthy individuals and frequently manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms; however, their ability to cause severe disease has not been extensively studied. Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity and transmissibility of two TRS viruses associated with disease in humans in the ferret model. TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses exhibited comparable viral titers and histopathologies following virus infection and were similarly unable to transmit efficiently via respiratory droplets in the ferret model. Utilizing TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses, we conducted extensive hematologic and blood serum analyses on infected ferrets to identify lymphohematopoietic parameters associated with mild to severe influenza virus infection. Following H1N1 or H5N1 influenza virus infection, ferrets were found to recapitulate several laboratory abnormalities previously documented with human disease, furthering the utility of the ferret model for the assessment of influenza virus pathogenicity.
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NS-based live attenuated H1N1 pandemic vaccines protect mice and ferrets.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2010
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Although vaccines against influenza A virus are the most effective method to combat infection, it is clear that their production needs to be accelerated and their efficacy improved. We generated live attenuated human influenza A vaccines (LAIVs) by rationally engineering mutations directly into the genome of a pandemic-H1N1 virus. Two LAIVs (NS1-73 and NS1-126) were based on the success of LAIVs for animal influenza A viruses. A third candidate (NS?5) is a unique NS-mutant that has never been used as a LAIV. The vaccine potential of each LAIV was determined through analysis of attenuation, interferon production, immunogenicity, and their ability to protect mice and ferrets. This study demonstrates that NS?5 is an ideal LAIV candidate, provides important information on the effects that different NS mutations have on the pandemic-H1N1 virus and shows that LAIVs can be engineered directly from the genomes of emerging/circulating influenza A viruses.
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Pathogenesis of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses in mice.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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The pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (2009 H1N1) continues to cause illness worldwide, primarily in younger age groups. To better understand the pathogenesis of these viruses in mammals, we used a mouse model to evaluate the relative virulence of selected 2009 H1N1 viruses and compared them to a representative human triple-reassortant swine influenza virus that has circulated in pigs in the United States for over a decade preceding the current pandemic. Additional comparisons were made with the reconstructed 1918 virus, a 1976 H1N1 swine influenza virus, and a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. Mice were inoculated intranasally with each virus and monitored for morbidity, mortality, viral replication, hemostatic parameters, cytokine production, and lung histology. All 2009 H1N1 viruses replicated efficiently in the lungs of mice and possessed a high degree of infectivity but did not cause lethal disease or exhibit extrapulmonary virus spread. Transient weight loss, lymphopenia, and proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production were present following 2009 H1N1 virus infection, but these levels were generally muted compared with a triple-reassortant swine virus and the 1918 virus. 2009 H1N1 viruses isolated from fatal cases did not demonstrate enhanced virulence in this model compared with isolates from mild human cases. Histologically, infection with the 2009 viruses resulted in lesions in the lung varying from mild to moderate bronchiolitis with occasional necrosis of bronchiolar epithelium and mild to moderate peribronchiolar alveolitis. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the 2009 H1N1 viruses exhibited mild to moderate virulence in mice compared with highly pathogenic viruses.
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PB1-F2 expression by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus has minimal impact on virulence in animal models.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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Unlike previous pandemic viruses, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus does not code for the virulence factor PB1-F2. The genome of the 2009 H1N1 virus contains three stop codons preventing PB1-F2 expression; however, PB1-F2 production could occur following genetic mutation or reassortment. Thus, it is of great interest to understand the impact that expression of the PB1-F2 protein might have in the context of the 2009 pandemic influenza virus, A/California/04/2009 (Cal/09). We have addressed this question by generating two Cal/09 viruses with productive PB1-F2 open reading frames containing either an asparagine at position 66 of PB1-F2 (66N) or a serine at position 66 (66S): this N66S change has previously been shown to be associated with increased virulence in mice. We used these viruses to investigate the effect on virulence conferred by expression of the 66N or the 66S PB1-F2 protein in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our results show enhanced replication of the 66S virus in A549 cells, while studies of BALB/c and DBA/2 mice and ferrets revealed no significant differences in symptoms of infection with wild-type Cal/09 versus the 66N or 66S virus variant. Also, coinfection of mice with Streptococcus pneumoniae and the different viruses (recombinant wild-type [rWT] Cal/09 and the 66N and 66S viruses) did not result in significant differences in mortality. Mice infected with either PB1-F2-expressing virus did demonstrate altered protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines; differences were observed to be greater in infection caused by the 66S virus. In summary, our study demonstrates that PB1-F2 expression by the Cal/09 virus modulates the immune response to infection while having a minimal effect on virus virulence in two mammalian models.
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A live attenuated H1N1 M1 mutant provides broad cross-protection against influenza A viruses, including highly pathogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004, in mice.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2009
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The emergence of novel influenza A H1N1 and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses underscores the urgency of developing efficient vaccines against an imminent pandemic. M(NLS-88R) (H1N1), an A/WSN/33 mutant with modifications in the multibasic motif 101RKLKR105 of the matrix (M1) protein and its adjacent region, was generated by reverse genetics. The M(NLS-88R) mutant had in vitro growth characteristics similar to those of wild-type A/WSN/33 (wt-WSN), but it was attenuated in mice. Vaccination with M(NLS-88R) not only fully protected mice from lethal homologous challenges but also prevented mortality caused by antigenically distinct H3N2 and H5N1 viruses. M(NLS-88R)-induced homologous protection was mainly antibody dependent, but cellular immunity was also beneficial in protecting against sublethal wt-WSN infection. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both humoral and cellular immune responses were crucial for M(NLS-88R)-induced heterologous protection. Our study suggests an alternative approach to attenuate wt influenza viruses for the development of a pandemic vaccine with broad cross-protection.
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Use of animal models to understand the pandemic potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.
Adv. Virus Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2009
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It has been 40 years since the last influenza pandemic and it is generally considered that another could occur at any time. Recent introductions of influenza A viruses from avian sources into the human population have raised concerns that these viruses may be a source of a future pandemic strain. Therefore, there is a need to better understand the pathogenicity of avian influenza viruses for mammalian species so that we may be better able to predict the pandemic potential of such viruses and develop improved methods for their prevention and control. In this review, we describe the virulence of H5 and H7 avian influenza viruses in the mouse and ferret models. The use of these models is providing exciting new insights into the contribution of virus and host responses toward avian influenza viruses, virus tropism, and virus transmissibility. Identifying the role of individual viral gene products and mapping the molecular determinants that influence the severity of disease observed following avian influenza virus infection is dependent on the use of reliable animal models. As avian influenza viruses continue to cause human disease and death, animal pathogenesis studies identify avenues of investigation for novel preventative and therapeutic agents that could be effective in the event of a future pandemic.
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Transmission and pathogenesis of swine-origin 2009 A(H1N1) influenza viruses in ferrets and mice.
Science
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2009
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Recent reports of mild to severe influenza-like illness in humans caused by a novel swine-origin 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus underscore the need to better understand the pathogenesis and transmission of these viruses in mammals. In this study, selected 2009 A(H1N1) influenza isolates were assessed for their ability to cause disease in mice and ferrets and compared with a contemporary seasonal H1N1 virus for their ability to transmit to naïve ferrets through respiratory droplets. In contrast to seasonal influenza H1N1 virus, 2009 A(H1N1) influenza viruses caused increased morbidity, replicated to higher titers in lung tissue, and were recovered from the intestinal tract of intranasally inoculated ferrets. The 2009 A(H1N1) influenza viruses exhibited less efficient respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets in comparison with the highly transmissible phenotype of a seasonal H1N1 virus. Transmission of the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza viruses was further corroborated by characterizing the binding specificity of the viral hemagglutinin to the sialylated glycan receptors (in the human host) by use of dose-dependent direct receptor-binding and human lung tissue-binding assays.
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Novel pandemic influenza A(H1N1) viruses are potently inhibited by DAS181, a sialidase fusion protein.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2009
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The recent emergence of a novel pandemic influenza A(H1N1) strain in humans exemplifies the rapid and unpredictable nature of influenza virus evolution and the need for effective therapeutics and vaccines to control such outbreaks. However, resistance to antivirals can be a formidable problem as evidenced by the currently widespread oseltamivir- and adamantane-resistant seasonal influenza A viruses (IFV). Additional antiviral approaches with novel mechanisms of action are needed to combat novel and resistant influenza strains. DAS181 (Fludase) is a sialidase fusion protein in early clinical development with in vitro and in vivo preclinical activity against a variety of seasonal influenza strains and highly pathogenic avian influenza strains (A/H5N1). Here, we use in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models to evaluate the activity of DAS181 against several pandemic influenza A(H1N1) viruses.
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Ocular infection of mice with influenza A (H7) viruses: a site of primary replication and spread to the respiratory tract.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2009
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Avian H7 influenza viruses have been responsible for poultry outbreaks worldwide and have resulted in numerous cases of human infection in recent years. The high rate of conjunctivitis associated with avian H7 subtype virus infections may represent a portal of entry for avian influenza viruses and highlights the need to better understand the apparent ocular tropism observed in humans. To study this, mice were inoculated by the ocular route with viruses of multiple subtypes and degrees of virulence. We found that in contrast to human (H3N2 and H1N1) viruses, H7N7 viruses isolated from The Netherlands in 2003 and H7N3 viruses isolated from British Columbia, Canada, in 2004, two subtypes that were highly virulent for poultry, replicated to a significant titer in the mouse eye. Remarkably, an H7N7 virus, as well as some avian H5N1 viruses, spread systemically following ocular inoculation, including to the brain, resulting in morbidity and mortality of mice. This correlated with efficient replication of highly pathogenic H7 and H5 subtypes in murine corneal epithelial sheets (ex vivo) and primary human corneal epithelial cells (in vitro). Influenza viruses were labeled to identify the virus attachment site in the mouse cornea. Although we found abundant H7 virus attachment to corneal epithelial tissue, this did not account for the differences in virus replication as multiple subtypes were able to attach to these cells. These findings demonstrate that avian influenza viruses within H7 and H5 subtypes are capable of using the eye as a portal of entry.
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Resurrected pandemic influenza viruses.
Annu. Rev. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2009
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Influenza viruses continue to pose a major global public health problem. There is a need to better understand the pathogenicity and transmission of pandemic influenza viruses so that we may develop improved methods for their prevention and control. Reconstruction of the 1918 virus and studies elucidating the exceptional virulence and transmissibility of the virus are providing exciting new insights into this devastating pandemic strain. The primary approach has been to reconstruct and analyze recombinant viruses, in which genes of the 1918 virus are replaced with genes of contemporary influenza viruses of lesser virulence. This review highlights the current status of the field and discusses the molecular determinants of the 1918 pandemic virus that may have contributed to its virulence and spread. Identifying the exact genes responsible for the high virulence of the 1918 virus will be an important step toward understanding virulent influenza strains and will allow the world to better prepare for and respond to future influenza pandemics.
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Generation, characterization and epitope mapping of two neutralizing and protective human recombinant antibodies against influenza A H5N1 viruses.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2009
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The development of new therapeutic targets and strategies to control highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus infection in humans is urgently needed. Broadly cross-neutralizing recombinant human antibodies obtained from the survivors of H5N1 avian influenza provide an important role in immunotherapy for human H5N1 virus infection and definition of the critical epitopes for vaccine development.
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Early control of H5N1 influenza virus replication by the type I interferon response in mice.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2009
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Widespread distribution of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses in domesticated and wild birds continues to pose a threat to public health, as interspecies transmission of virus has resulted in increasing numbers of human disease cases. Although the pathogenic mechanism(s) of H5N1 influenza viruses has not been fully elucidated, it has been suggested that the ability to evade host innate responses, such as the type I interferon response, may contribute to the virulence of these viruses in mammals. We investigated the role that type I interferons (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-alpha/beta]) might play in H5N1 pathogenicity in vivo, by comparing the kinetics and outcomes of H5N1 virus infection in IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFN-alpha/betaR)-deficient and SvEv129 wild-type mice using two avian influenza A viruses isolated from humans, A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK/483) and A/Hong Kong/486/97 (HK/486), which exhibit high and low lethality in mice, respectively. IFN-alpha/betaR-deficient mice experienced significantly more weight loss and more rapid time to death than did wild-type mice. HK/486 virus caused a systemic infection similar to that with HK/483 virus in IFN-alpha/betaR-deficient mice, suggesting a role for IFN-alpha/beta in controlling the systemic spread of this H5N1 virus. HK/483 virus replicated more efficiently than HK/486 virus both in vivo and in vitro. However, replication of both viruses was significantly reduced following pretreatment with IFN-alpha/beta. These results suggest a role for the IFN-alpha/beta response in the control of H5N1 virus replication both in vivo and in vitro, and as such it may provide some degree of protection to the host in the early stages of infection.
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Human HA and polymerase subunit PB2 proteins confer transmission of an avian influenza virus through the air.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2009
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The influenza virus genes that confer efficient transmission of epidemic and pandemic strains in humans have not been identified. The rapid spread and severe disease caused by the 1918 influenza pandemic virus makes it an ideal virus to study the transmissibility of potentially pandemic influenza strains. Here, we used a series of human 1918-avian H1N1 influenza reassortant viruses to identify the genetic determinants that govern airborne transmission of avian influenza viruses. We have demonstrated that the 1918 HA gene was necessary for efficient direct contact transmission, but did not allow respiratory droplet transmission between ferrets of an avian influenza virus possessing an avian polymerase subunit PB2. The 1918 PB2 protein was found to be both necessary and sufficient for airborne transmission of a virus expressing the 1918 HA and neuraminidase. Also, it was found that influenza viruses that were able to transmit efficiently in ferrets were able to replicate efficiently at the lower temperature (33 degrees C) found in the environment of mammalian airway. These findings demonstrate that the adaptation of the HA and PB2 proteins are critical for the development of pandemic influenza strains from avian influenza viruses.
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Pathogenesis of 1918 pandemic and H5N1 influenza virus infections in a guinea pig model: antiviral potential of exogenous alpha interferon to reduce virus shedding.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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Although highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses have yet to acquire the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, the increasing genetic diversity among these viruses and continued outbreaks in avian species underscore the need for more effective measures for the control and prevention of human H5N1 virus infection. Additional small animal models with which therapeutic approaches against virulent influenza viruses can be evaluated are needed. In this study, we used the guinea pig model to evaluate the relative virulence of selected avian and human influenza A viruses. We demonstrate that guinea pigs can be infected with avian and human influenza viruses, resulting in high titers of virus shedding in nasal washes for up to 5 days postinoculation (p.i.) and in lung tissue of inoculated animals. However, other physiologic indicators typically associated with virulent influenza virus strains were absent in this species. We evaluated the ability of intranasal treatment with human alpha interferon (alpha-IFN) to reduce lung and nasal wash titers in guinea pigs challenged with the reconstructed 1918 pandemic H1N1 virus or a contemporary H5N1 virus. IFN treatment initiated 1 day prior to challenge significantly reduced or prevented infection of guinea pigs by both viruses, as measured by virus titer determination and seroconversion. The expression of the antiviral Mx protein in lung tissue correlated with the reduction of virus titers. We propose that the guinea pig may serve as a useful small animal model for testing the efficacy of antiviral compounds and that alpha-IFN treatment may be a useful antiviral strategy against highly virulent strains with pandemic potential.
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Tropism and infectivity of influenza virus, including highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus, in ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell cultures.
J. Virol.
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Tropism and adaptation of influenza viruses to new hosts is partly dependent on the distribution of the sialic acid (SA) receptors to which the viral hemagglutinin (HA) binds. Ferrets have been established as a valuable in vivo model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission because of similarities to humans in the distribution of HA receptors and in clinical signs of infection. In this study, we developed a ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture model that consisted of a layered epithelium structure with ciliated and nonciliated cells on its apical surface. We found that human-like (?2,6-linked) receptors predominated on ciliated cells, whereas avian-like (?2,3-linked) receptors, which were less abundant, were presented on nonciliated cells. When we compared the tropism and infectivity of three human (H1 and H3) and two avian (H1 and H5) influenza viruses, we observed that the human influenza viruses primarily infected ciliated cells and replicated efficiently, whereas a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) replicated efficiently within nonciliated cells despite a low initial infection rate. Furthermore, compared to other influenza viruses tested, VN/1203 virus replicated more efficiently in cells isolated from the lower trachea and at a higher temperature (37°C) compared to a lower temperature (33°C). VN/1203 virus infection also induced higher levels of immune mediator genes and cell death, and virus was recovered from the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. This ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture system provides a valuable in vitro model for studying cellular tropism, infectivity, and the pathogenesis of influenza viruses.
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Seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus infection in ferrets.
J. Virol.
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The influenza virus H1N1 pandemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical catastrophes in human history. Recent studies have demonstrated that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the 1918 virus and 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus [A(H1N1)pdm09], the latter now a component of the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV), share cross-reactive antigenic determinants. In this study, we demonstrate that immunization with the 2010-2011 seasonal TIV induces neutralizing antibodies that cross-react with the reconstructed 1918 pandemic virus in ferrets. TIV-immunized ferrets subsequently challenged with the 1918 virus displayed significant reductions in fever, weight loss, and virus shedding compared to these parameters in nonimmune control ferrets. Seasonal TIV was also effective in protecting against the lung infection and severe lung pathology associated with 1918 virus infection. Our data demonstrate that prior immunization with contemporary TIV provides cross-protection against the 1918 virus in ferrets. These findings suggest that exposure to A(H1N1)pdm09 through immunization may provide protection against the reconstructed 1918 virus which, as a select agent, is considered to pose both biosafety and biosecurity threats.
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Implication of inflammatory macrophages, nuclear receptors, and interferon regulatory factors in increased virulence of pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus after host adaptation.
J. Virol.
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While pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses were responsible for numerous severe infections in humans, these viruses do not typically cause corresponding severe disease in mammalian models. However, the generation of a virulent 2009 H1N1 virus following serial lung passage in mice has allowed for the modeling of human lung pathology in this species. Genetic determinants of mouse-adapted 2009 H1N1 viral pathogenicity have been identified, but the molecular and signaling characteristics of the host response following infection with this adapted virus have not been described. Here we compared the gene expression response following infection of mice with A/CA/04/2009 (CA/04) or the virulent mouse-adapted strain (MA-CA/04). Microarray analysis revealed that increased pathogenicity of MA-CA/04 was associated with the following: (i) an early and sustained inflammatory and interferon response that could be driven in part by interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and increased NF-?B activation, as well as inhibition of the negative regulator TRIM24, (ii) early and persistent infiltration of immune cells, including inflammatory macrophages, and (iii) the absence of activation of lipid metabolism later in infection, which may be mediated by inhibition of nuclear receptors, including PPARG and HNF1A and -4A, with proinflammatory consequences. Further investigation of these signatures in the host response to other H1N1 viruses of various pathogenicities confirmed their general relevance for virulence of influenza virus and suggested that lung response to MA-CA/04 virus was similar to that following infection with lethal H1N1 r1918 influenza virus. This study links differential activation of IRFs, nuclear receptors, and macrophage infiltration with influenza virulence in vivo.
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Innovations in modeling influenza virus infections in the laboratory.
Trends Microbiol.
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Respiratory viruses represent one of the most substantial infectious disease burdens to the human population today, and in particular, seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses pose a persistent threat to public health worldwide. In recent years, advances in techniques used in experimental research have provided the means to better understand the mechanisms of pathogenesis and transmission of respiratory viruses, and thus more accurately model these infections in the laboratory. Here, we briefly review the model systems used to study influenza virus infections, and focus particularly on recent advances that have increased our knowledge of these formidable respiratory pathogens.
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Influenza virus respiratory infection and transmission following ocular inoculation in ferrets.
PLoS Pathog.
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While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of entry for establishment of a respiratory infection. However, the properties which govern ocular tropism of influenza viruses, the mechanisms of virus spread from ocular to respiratory tissue, and the potential differences in respiratory disease initiated from different exposure routes are poorly understood. Here, we established a ferret model of ocular inoculation to explore the development of virus pathogenicity and transmissibility following influenza virus exposure by the ocular route. We found that multiple subtypes of human and avian influenza viruses mounted a productive virus infection in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets following ocular inoculation, and were additionally detected in ocular tissue during the acute phase of infection. H5N1 viruses maintained their ability for systemic spread and lethal infection following inoculation by the ocular route. Replication-independent deposition of virus inoculum from ocular to respiratory tissue was limited to the nares and upper trachea, unlike traditional intranasal inoculation which results in virus deposition in both upper and lower respiratory tract tissues. Despite high titers of replicating transmissible seasonal viruses in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets inoculated by the ocular route, virus transmissibility to naïve contacts by respiratory droplets was reduced following ocular inoculation. These data improve our understanding of the mechanisms of virus spread following ocular exposure and highlight differences in the establishment of respiratory disease and virus transmissibility following use of different inoculation volumes and routes.
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Pathogenesis and transmission of swine origin A(H3N2)v influenza viruses in ferrets.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Recent isolation of a novel swine-origin influenza A H3N2 variant virus [A(H3N2)v] from humans in the United States has raised concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. Here, we analyzed the virulence, transmissibility, and receptor-binding preference of four A(H3N2)v influenza viruses isolated from humans in 2009, 2010, and 2011. High titers of infectious virus were detected in nasal turbinates and nasal wash samples of A(H3N2)v-inoculated ferrets. All four A(H3N2)v viruses possessed the capacity to spread efficiently between cohoused ferrets, and the 2010 and 2011 A(H3N2)v isolates transmitted efficiently to naïve ferrets by respiratory droplets. A dose-dependent glycan array analysis of A(H3N2)v showed a predominant binding to ?2-6-sialylated glycans, similar to human-adapted influenza A viruses. We further tested the viral replication efficiency of A(H3N2)v viruses in a relevant cell line, Calu-3, derived from human bronchial epithelium. The A(H3N2)v viruses replicated in Calu-3 cells to significantly higher titers compared with five common seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses. These findings suggest that A(H3N2)v viruses have the capacity for efficient replication and transmission in mammals and underscore the need for continued public health surveillance.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.