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Dynamics of sodium channel Nav1.5 expression in astrocytes in mouse models of multiple sclerosis.
Neuroreport
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2014
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Astrocytes actively participate in the response of the central nervous system to injury, including in multiple sclerosis. Astrocytes can play both beneficial and detrimental roles in response to neuroinflammation; however, in extreme cases, astrogliosis can result in the formation of a glial scar, which can impede the regeneration of injured neurons. Although astrocytes do not express the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 in the nonpathological human brain, they exhibit robust upregulation of Nav1.5 within acute and chronic multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent work has indicated that Nav1.5 contributes to the pathways that regulate glial scar formation in vitro through modulation of intracellular Ca levels. However, the temporal dynamics of astrocytic Nav1.5 channel expression in response to neuroinflammatory pathologies has not been investigated. We examined astrocytes from mice with monophasic and chronic-relapsing (CR) experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by immunohistochemical analysis to determine whether Nav1.5 is expressed in these cells, and whether the expression correlates with the severity of disease and/or phases of relapse and remission. Our results demonstrate that Nav1.5 is upregulated in astrocytes in situ in a temporal manner that correlates with disease severity in both monophasic and CR EAE. Further, in CR EAE, Nav1.5 expression is upregulated during relapses and subsequently attenuated during periods of remission. These observations are consistent with the suggestion that Nav1.5 can play a role in the response of astrocytes to inflammatory pathologies in the central nervous system and suggest Nav1.5 may be a potential therapeutic target to modulate reactive astrogliosis in vivo.
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Contribution of sodium channels to lamellipodial protrusion and Rac1 and ERK1/2 activation in ATP-stimulated microglia.
Glia
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2014
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Microglia are motile resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS) that continuously explore their territories for threats to tissue homeostasis. Following CNS insult (e.g., cellular injury, infection, or ischemia), microglia respond to signals such as ATP, transform into an activated state, and migrate towards the threat. Directed migration is a complex and highly-coordinated process involving multiple intersecting cellular pathways, including signal transduction, membrane adhesion and retraction, cellular polarization, and rearrangement of cytoskeletal elements. We previously demonstrated that the activity of sodium channels contributes to ATP-induced migration of microglia. Here we show that TTX-sensitive sodium channels, specifically NaV 1.6, participate in an initial event in the migratory process, i.e., the formation in ATP-stimulated microglia of polymerized actin-rich membrane protrusions, lamellipodia, containing accumulations of Rac1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2. We also examined Ca(2+) transients in microglia and found that blockade of sodium channels with TTX produced a downward shift in the level of [Ca(2+) ]i during the delayed, slower recovery of [Ca(2+) ]i following ATP stimulation. These observations demonstrate a modulatory role of sodium channels on Ca(2+) transients in microglia that are likely to affect down-stream signaling cascades. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrate that ATP-induced microglial migration is mediated via Rac1 and ERK1/2, but not p38?/? and JNK, dependent pathways, and that activation of both Rac1 and ERK1/2 is modulated by sodium channel activity. Our results provide evidence for a direct link between sodium channel activity and modulation of Rac1 and ERK1/2 activation in ATP-stimulated microglia, possibly by regulating Ca(2+) transients. GLIA 2014;62:2080-2095.
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Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav 1.5 contributes to astrogliosis in an in vitro model of glial injury via reverse Na+ /Ca2+ exchange.
Glia
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2014
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Astrogliosis is a prominent feature of many, if not all, pathologies of the brain and spinal cord, yet a detailed understanding of the underlying molecular pathways involved in the transformation from quiescent to reactive astrocyte remains elusive. We investigated the contribution of voltage-gated sodium channels to astrogliosis in an in vitro model of mechanical injury to astrocytes. Previous studies have shown that a scratch injury to astrocytes invokes dual mechanisms of migration and proliferation in these cells. Our results demonstrate that wound closure after mechanical injury, involving both migration and proliferation, is attenuated by pharmacological treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX) and KB-R7943, at a dose that blocks reverse mode of the Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), and by knockdown of Nav 1.5 mRNA. We also show that astrocytes display a robust [Ca(2+) ]i transient after mechanical injury and demonstrate that this [Ca(2+) ]i response is also attenuated by TTX, KB-R7943, and Nav 1.5 mRNA knockdown. Our results suggest that Nav 1.5 and NCX are potential targets for modulation of astrogliosis after injury via their effect on [Ca(2+) ]i .
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Sodium channels contribute to degeneration of dorsal root ganglion neurites induced by mitochondrial dysfunction in an in vitro model of axonal injury.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2013
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Axonal degeneration occurs in multiple neurodegenerative disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the underlying molecular pathways leading to axonal degeneration are incompletely understood, accumulating evidence suggests contributions of impaired mitochondrial function, disrupted axonal transport, and/or dysfunctional intracellular Ca(2+)-homeostasis in the injurious cascade associated with axonal degeneration. Utilizing an in vitro model of axonal degeneration, we studied a subset of mouse peripheral sensory neurons in which neurites were exposed selectively to conditions associated with the pathogenesis of axonal neuropathies in vivo. Rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction resulted in neurite degeneration accompanied by reduced ATP levels and increased ROS levels in neurites. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels with TTX and reverse (Ca(2+)-importing) mode of the sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) with KB-R7943 partially protected rotenone-treated neurites from degeneration, suggesting a contribution of sodium channels and reverse NCX activity to the degeneration of neurites resulting from impaired mitochondrial function. Pharmacological inhibition of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with ouabain induced neurite degeneration, which was attenuated by TTX and KB-R7943, supporting a contribution of sodium channels in axonal degenerative pathways accompanying impaired Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. Conversely, oxidant stress (H2O2)-induced neurite degeneration was not attenuated by TTX. Our results demonstrate that both energetic and oxidative stress targeted selectively to neurites induces neurite degeneration and that blockade of sodium channels and of reverse NCX activity blockade partially protects neurites from injury due to energetic stress, but not from oxidative stress induced by H2O2.
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Noncanonical roles of voltage-gated sodium channels.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2013
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The Hodgkin-Huxley formulation, at its 60th anniversary, remains a bastion of neuroscience. Sodium channels Nav1.1-Nav1.3 and Nav1.6-Nav1.9 support electrogenesis in neurons and are often considered "neuronal," whereas Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 drive electrogenesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle. These channels are, however, expressed in cell types that are not considered electrically excitable. Here, we discuss sodium channel expression in diverse nonexcitable cell types, including astrocytes, NG2 cells, microglia, macrophages, and cancer cells, and review evidence of noncanonical roles, including regulation of effector functions such as phagocytosis, motility, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, and metastatic activity. Armed with powerful techniques for monitoring channel activity and for real-time assessment of [Na(+)]i and [Ca(2+)]i, neuroscientists are poised to expand the understanding of noncanonical roles of sodium channels in healthy and diseased tissues.
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NaV1.7: stress-induced changes in immunoreactivity within magnocellular neurosecretory neurons of the supraoptic nucleus.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2013
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NaV1.7 is preferentially expressed, at relatively high levels, in peripheral neurons, and is often referred to as a "peripheral" sodium channel, and NaV1.7-specific blockers are under study as potential pain therapeutics which might be expected to have minimal CNS side effects. However, occasional reports of patients with NaV1.7 gain-of-function mutations and apparent hypothalamic dysfunction have appeared. The two sodium channels previously studied within the rat hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus, NaV1.2 and NaV1.6, display up-regulated expression in response to osmotic stress.
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Correlation of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 sodium channel expression with neuropathic pain in human subjects with lingual nerve neuromas.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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Voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are expressed preferentially in small diameter sensory neurons, and are thought to play a role in the generation of ectopic activity in neuronal cell bodies and/or their axons following peripheral nerve injury. The expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 has been quantified in human lingual nerves that have been previously injured inadvertently during lower third molar removal, and any correlation between the expression of these ion channels and the presence or absence of dysaesthesia investigated.
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Neuropathy-associated Nav1.7 variant I228M impairs integrity of dorsal root ganglion neuron axons.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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Small-fiber neuropathy (SFN) is characterized by injury to small-diameter peripheral nerve axons and intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENF). Although mechanisms underlying loss of IENF in SFN are poorly understood, available data suggest that it results from axonal degeneration and reduced regenerative capacity. Gain-of-function variants in sodium channel Na(V)1.7 that increase firing frequency and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have recently been identified in ?30% of patients with idiopathic SFN. In the present study, to determine whether these channel variants can impair axonal integrity, we developed an in vitro assay of DRG neurite length, and examined the effect of 3 SFN-associated variant Na(V)1.7 channels, I228M, M932L/V991L (ML/VL), and I720K, on DRG neurites in vitro. At 3 days after culturing, DRG neurons transfected with I228M channels exhibited ?20% reduced neurite length compared to wild-type channels; DRG neurons transfected with ML/VL and I720K variants displayed a trend toward reduced neurite length. I228M-induced reduction in neurite length was ameliorated by the use-dependent sodium channel blocker carbamazepine and by a blocker of reverse Na-Ca exchange. These in vitro observations provide evidence supporting a contribution of the I228M variant Na(V)1.7 channel to impaired regeneration and/or degeneration of sensory axons in idiopathic SFN, and suggest that enhanced sodium channel activity and reverse Na-Ca exchange can contribute to a decrease in length of peripheral sensory axons.
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Sodium channels and microglial function.
Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2011
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Microglia are resident immune cells that provide continuous surveillance within the central nervous system (CNS) and respond to perturbations of brain and spinal cord parenchyma with an array of effector functions, including proliferation, migration, phagocytosis, secretions of multiple cytokines/chemokines and promotion of repair. To sense alterations within their environment, microglia express a large number of cell surface receptors, ion channels and adhesion molecules, which activate complex and dynamic signaling pathways. In the present chapter, we review studies that demonstrate that microglia in vivo and in vitro express specific voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms, and that blockade of sodium channel activity can attenuate several effector functions of microglia. These studies also provide strong evidence that Nav1.6 is the predominant sodium channel isoform expressed in microglia and that its activity contributes to the response of microglia to multiple activating signals.
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Nav1.7 accumulates and co-localizes with phosphorylated ERK1/2 within transected axons in early experimental neuromas.
Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2011
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Peripheral nerve injury can result in formation of a neuroma, which is often associated with heightened sensitivity to normally innocuous stimuli as well as spontaneous dysesthesia and pain. The onset and persistence of neuropathic pain have been linked to spontaneous ectopic electrogenesis in axons within neuromas, suggesting an involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels. Sodium channel isoforms Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8 have been shown to accumulate in chronic painful human neuromas, while, to date, only Na(V)1.3 has been reported to accumulate within experimental neuromas. Although recent evidence strongly support a major contribution for Na(V)1.7 in nociception, the expression of Na(V)1.7 in injured axons within acute neuromas has not been studied. The current study examined whether Na(V)1.7 accumulates in experimental rat neuromas. We further investigated whether activated (phosphorylated) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase ERK1/2, which is known to modulate Na(V)1.7 properties, is co-localized with Na(V)1.7 within axons in neuromas. We demonstrate increased levels of Na(V)1.7 in experimental rat sciatic nerve neuromas, 2weeks after nerve ligation and transaction. We further show elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 within individual neuroma axons that exhibit Na(V)1.7 accumulation. These results extend previous descriptions of sodium channel and MAP kinase accumulation within experimental and human neuromas, and suggest that targeted blockade of Na(V)1.7 or ERK1/2 may provide a strategy for amelioration of chronic pain that often follows nerve injury and formation of neuromas.
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Nav1.7 is the predominant sodium channel in rodent olfactory sensory neurons.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2011
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Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 is preferentially expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sympathetic neurons within the peripheral nervous system. Homozygous or compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene which encodes Nav1.7, cause congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) accompanied by anosmia. Global knock-out of Nav1.7 in mice is neonatal lethal reportedly from starvation, suggesting anosmia. These findings led us to hypothesize that Nav1.7 is the main sodium channel in the peripheral olfactory sensory neurons (OSN, also known as olfactory receptor neurons).
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Slowly progressive axonal degeneration in a rat model of chronic, nonimmune-mediated demyelination.
J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2010
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Axonal degeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is associated with neurologic disability. In some diseases, it has been postulated that axonal degeneration may be caused by loss of trophic support normally provided by oligodendrocytes and myelin. To investigate this phenomenon, we studied axonal pathology in the taiep mutant rat, which develops nonimmune oligodendrocyte dysfunction and myelin loss. Using immunohistochemical analysis of several CNS regions, we show that accumulation of dephosphorylated neurofilaments occurs in taiep axons. These changes become more pronounced as myelin loss increases and characteristic spheroids, representing transected axons, become abundant. Amyloid precursor protein staining is increased in taiep white matter tracts, indicating abnormalities of axonal transport. These changes do not occur in wild type controls. Optic nerve counts demonstrate progressive axonal loss throughout the life of the rat; early axonal loss occurs in the context of dysmyelination; later axonal loss is likely to be related to chronic demyelination. The axonal pathology in the taiep rat provides evidence that CNS axonopathy may, in certain situations, be related to a loss of trophic support normally provided by cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage and/or myelin; this may occur in the absence of significant inflammation.
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Neuroma removal for neuropathic pain: efficacy and predictive value of lidocaine infusion.
Clin J Pain
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2010
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Injury to peripheral nerves associated with trauma, amputation, or surgery may lead to the formation of neuromas that can produce severe pain refractory to pharmacotherapy. Ectopic impulse activity arising in blindly ending axons within the neuroma, which contain abnormal accumulations of sodium channels, is thought to be a major contributor to this pain. The effect of surgical excision has remained controversial. Here we report a prospective study on the effect of neuroma removal on pain.
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Sodium-calcium exchanger and multiple sodium channel isoforms in intra-epidermal nerve terminals.
Mol Pain
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2010
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Nociception requires transduction and impulse electrogenesis in nerve fibers which innervate the body surface, including the skin. However, the molecular substrates for transduction and action potential initiation in nociceptors are incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the expression and distribution of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) and voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms in intra-epidermal free nerve terminals.
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Sodium channels in normal and pathological pain.
Annu. Rev. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2010
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Nociception is essential for survival whereas pathological pain is maladaptive and often unresponsive to pharmacotherapy. Voltage-gated sodium channels, Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.9, are essential for generation and conduction of electrical impulses in excitable cells. Human and animal studies have identified several channels as pivotal for signal transmission along the pain axis, including Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9, with the latter three preferentially expressed in peripheral sensory neurons and Na(v)1.3 being upregulated along pain-signaling pathways after nervous system injuries. Na(v)1.7 is of special interest because it has been linked to a spectrum of inherited human pain disorders. Here we review the contribution of these sodium channel isoforms to pain.
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Astrocytes within multiple sclerosis lesions upregulate sodium channel Nav1.5.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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Astrocytes are prominent participants in the response of the central nervous system to injury, including neuroinflammatory insults. Rodent astrocytes in vitro have been shown to express voltage-gated sodium channels in a dynamic manner, with a switch in expression of tetrodotoxin-sensitive to tetrodotoxin-resistant channels in reactive astrocytes. However, the expression of sodium channels in human astrocytes has not been studied, and it is not known whether there are changes in the expression of sodium channels in reactive astrocytes of the human central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate a focal and robust upregulation of sodium channel Nav1.5 in reactive astrocytes at the borders of, and within, active and chronic multiple sclerosis lesions. Nav1.5 was only detectable at very low levels in astrocytes within multiple sclerosis macroscopically normal-appearing white matter or in normal control brain. Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3 and Nav1.6 showed little or no expression in astrocytes within normal control tissue and limited upregulation in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Nav1.5 was also expressed at high levels in astrocytes in tissue surrounding new and old cerebrovascular accidents and brain tumours. These results demonstrate the expression of Nav1.5 in human astrocytes and show that Nav1.5 expression is dynamic in these cells. Our observations suggest that the upregulated expression of Nav1.5 in astrocytes may provide a compensatory mechanism, which supports sodium/potassium pump-dependent ionic homoeostasis in areas of central nervous system injury.
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ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylates sodium channel Na(v)1.7 and alters its gating properties.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Na(v)1.7 sodium channels can amplify weak stimuli in neurons and act as threshold channels for firing action potentials. Neurotrophic factors and pro-nociceptive cytokines that are released during development and under pathological conditions activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Previous studies have shown that MAPKs can transduce developmental or pathological signals by regulating transcription factors that initiate a gene expression response, a long-term effect, and directly modulate neuronal ion channels including sodium channels, thus acutely regulating dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron excitability. For example, neurotrophic growth factor activates (phosphorylates) ERK1/2 MAPK (pERK1/2) in DRG neurons, an effect that has been implicated in injury-induced hyperalgesia. However, the acute effects of pERK1/2 on sodium channels are not known. We have shown previously that activated p38 MAPK (pp38) directly phosphorylates Na(v)1.6 and Na(v)1.8 sodium channels and regulates their current densities without altering their gating properties. We now report that acute inhibition of pERK1/2 regulates resting membrane potential and firing properties of DRG neurons. We also show that pERK1 phosphorylates specific residues within L1 of Na(v)1.7, inhibition of pERK1/2 causes a depolarizing shift of activation and fast inactivation of Na(v)1.7 without altering current density, and mutation of these L1 phosphoacceptor sites abrogates the effect of pERK1/2 on this channel. Together, these data are consistent with direct phosphorylation and modulation of Na(v)1.7 by pERK1/2, which unlike the modulation of Na(v)1.6 and Na(v)1.8 by pp38, regulates gating properties of this channel but not its current density and contributes to the effects of MAPKs on DRG neuron excitability.
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Voltage-gated sodium channels: therapeutic targets for pain.
Pain Med
PUBLISHED: 10-13-2009
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To provide an overview of the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in pathophysiology of acquired and inherited pain states, and of recent developments that validate these channels as therapeutic targets for treating chronic pain.
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Sodium channel activity modulates multiple functions in microglia.
Glia
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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Microglia provide surveillance in the central nervous system and become activated following tissue insult. Detailed mechanisms by which microglia detect and respond to their environment are not fully understood, but it is known that microglia express a number of surface receptors and ion channels, including voltage-gated sodium channels, that participate in transduction of external stimuli to intra-cellular responses. To determine whether activated microglia are affected by the activity of sodium channels, we examined the expression of sodium channel isoforms in cultured microglia and the action of sodium channel blockade on multiple functions of activated microglia. Rat microglia in vitro express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 and the TTX-resistant channel Nav1.5, but not detectable levels of Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9. Sodium channel blockade with phenytoin (40 microM) and TTX (0.3 microM) significantly reduced by 50-60% the phagocytic activity of microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS); blockade with 10 microM TTX did not further reduce phagocytic activity. Phenytoin attenuated by approximately 50% the release of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha from LPS-stimulated microglia, but had minimal effects on the release of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1, and TGF-alpha. TTX (0.3 microM) reduced, but to a smaller extent, the release of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha from activated microglia. Phenytoin and TTX also significantly decreased by approximately 50% adenosine triphosphate-induced migration by microglia; studies with microglia cultured from med mice (which lack Nav1.6) indicate that Nav1.6 plays a role in microglial migration. The results demonstrate that the activity of sodium channels contributes to effector roles of activated microglia.
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Transfection of rat or mouse neurons by biolistics or electroporation.
Nat Protoc
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2009
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Properties of ion channels are affected by the background of the cells in which they are expressed. Thus, it is important for investigators interested in neuronal function to study these proteins in post-mitotic neurons. However, post-mitotic neurons, and many cell lines, are difficult to transfect by standard methods. Here we provide detailed protocols for two different procedures, biolistic and electroporation, which have been used to transfect peripheral sensory neurons from mice or rats with expression constructs of voltage-gated sodium channels. Neurons can be prepared, transfected and currents recorded within 48 h. Using these methods, primary sensory neurons can be transfected with an efficiency of 5-20%, which has permitted studying biophysical properties of sodium channels and their naturally occurring mutants in a native neuronal cell background. Although we have used sodium channels for the examples that we show here, these methods can also be used to study other types of molecules.
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The Na(V)1.7 sodium channel: from molecule to man.
Nat. Rev. Neurosci.
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The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.7 is preferentially expressed in peripheral somatic and visceral sensory neurons, olfactory sensory neurons and sympathetic ganglion neurons. Na(V)1.7 accumulates at nerve fibre endings and amplifies small subthreshold depolarizations, poising it to act as a threshold channel that regulates excitability. Genetic and functional studies have added to the evidence that Na(V)1.7 is a major contributor to pain signalling in humans, and homology modelling based on crystal structures of ion channels suggests an atomic-level structural basis for the altered gating of mutant Na(V)1.7 that causes pain.
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Expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to central preterminal branches and terminals in the dorsal horn.
Mol Pain
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Sodium channel Nav1.7 has emerged as a target of considerable interest in pain research, since loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene that encodes Nav1.7, are associated with a syndrome of congenital insensitivity to pain, gain-of-function mutations are linked to the debiliting chronic pain conditions erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and upregulated expression of Nav1.7 accompanies pain in diabetes and inflammation. Since Nav1.7 has been implicated as playing a critical role in pain pathways, we examined by immunocytochemical methods the expression and distribution of Nav1.7 in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons, from peripheral terminals in the skin to central terminals in the spinal cord dorsal horn.
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Schwann cell glycogen selectively supports myelinated axon function.
Ann. Neurol.
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Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined whether glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and whether it supported axon conduction during aglycemia.
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Nav1.5 sodium channels in macrophages in multiple sclerosis lesions.
Mult. Scler.
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Macrophages are dynamic participants in destruction of white matter in active multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques. Regulation of phagocytosis and myelin degradation along endosomal pathways in macrophages is highly-orchestrated and critically-dependent upon acidification of endosomal lumena. Evidence from in vitro studies with macrophages and THP-1 cells suggests that sodium channel Nav1.5 is present in the limiting membrane of maturing endosomes where it plays a prominent role in the accumulation of protons. However, a contribution of the Nav1.5 channel to macrophage-mediated events in vivo has not been demonstrated.
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A channelopathy contributes to cerebellar dysfunction in a model of multiple sclerosis.
Ann. Neurol.
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Cerebellar dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) contributes significantly to disability, is relatively refractory to symptomatic therapy, and often progresses despite treatment with disease-modifying agents. We previously observed that sodium channel Nav1.8, whose expression is normally restricted to the peripheral nervous system, is present in cerebellar Purkinje neurons in a mouse model of MS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [EAE]) and in humans with MS. Here, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of Nav1.8 in cerebellum in MS and EAE has functional consequences contributing to symptom burden.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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