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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation using reduced-intensity conditioning.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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We examined risk of second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) using reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMC). RIC/NMC recipients with leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 2833) and lymphoma (n = 1436) between 1995 and 2006 were included. In addition, RIC/NMC recipients 40 to 60 years of age (n = 2138) were compared with patients of the same age receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC, n = 6428). The cumulative incidence of solid cancers was 3.35% at 10 years. There was no increase in overall cancer risk compared with the general population (leukemia/MDS: standardized incidence ratio [SIR] .99, P = 1.00; lymphoma: SIR .92, P = .75). However, risks were significantly increased in leukemia/MDS patients for cancers of lip (SIR 14.28), tonsil (SIR 8.66), oropharynx (SIR 46.70), bone (SIR 23.53), soft tissue (SIR 12.92), and vulva (SIR 18.55) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.04). Lymphoma patients had significantly higher risks of oropharyngeal cancer (SIR 67.35) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.52). Among RIC/NMC recipients, age >50 years was the only independent risk factor for solid cancers (hazard ratio [HR] 3.02, P < .001). Among patients ages 40 to 60 years, when adjusted for other factors, there was no difference in cancer risks between RIC/NMC and MAC in leukemia/MDS patients (HR .98, P = .905). In lymphoma patients, risks were lower after RIC/NMC (HR .51, P = .047). In conclusion, the overall risks of second solid cancers in RIC/NMC recipients are similar to the general population, although there is an increased risk of cancer at some sites. Studies with longer follow-up are needed to realize the complete risks of solid cancers after RIC/NMC AHCT.
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Better leukemia-free and overall survival in AML in first remission following cyclophosphamide in combination with busulfan compared with TBI.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2013
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Cyclophosphamide combined with total body irradiation (Cy/TBI) or busulfan (BuCy) are the most widely used myeloablative conditioning regimens for allotransplants. Recent data regarding their comparative effectiveness are lacking. We analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research for 1230 subjects receiving a first hematopoietic cell transplant from a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling or from an unrelated donor during the years 2000 to 2006 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) after conditioning with Cy/TBI or oral or intravenous (IV) BuCy. Multivariate analysis showed significantly less nonrelapse mortality (relative risk [RR] = 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.86; P = .007), and relapse after, but not before, 1 year posttransplant (RR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.08-0.65; P = .006), and better leukemia-free survival (RR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.55-0.88; P = .003) and survival (RR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.52-0.88; P = .003) in persons receiving IV, but not oral, Bu compared with TBI. In combination with Cy, IV Bu is associated with superior outcomes compared with TBI in patients with AML in first CR.
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Lung histology predicts outcome of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a severe complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with an unfavorable prognosis. Lung biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis. In this retrospective single-center study, we describe 33 patients who underwent biopsy for suspected BO. Ten patients had constrictive BO (CBO); 9 had lymphocytic bronchiolitis (LB), characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the bronchioles. Six additional patients (4, CBO; 2, LB) had concomitant infection; 8 had other pathological diagnoses. Seven patients with CBO and 3 with LB met the National Institutes of Health consensus BO syndrome definition criteria. An additional 7 patients with histologically confirmed CBO did not meet the consensus definition, 4 of them because of concomitant airway infection. At diagnosis, there were no significant differences between the CBO and LB groups in clinical presentation; pulmonary function tests (median forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] at baseline, 90.4% and 99% predicted, at time of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, 55.1% and 60.8% for CBO and LB groups, respectively); and chest scans. Treatment was similar in both groups but outcome was different depending on histological findings. FEV1 significantly improved in LB patients compared with CBO patients. Survivals at 1 and 3 years were 77% ± 12% and 60% ± 14% for patients with CBO and 91% ± 9% for patients with LB (P = .028). Lung biopsy in patients with suspected BO enables better characterization of the pattern of BO syndrome. In contrast to CBO, LB is associated with a good long-term prognosis.
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Genital chronic GVHD in men after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a single-center cross-sectional analysis of 155 patients.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2013
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We assessed the prevalence and clinical features of genital skin changes in men after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and evaluated the correlation between genital chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and other manifestations of cGVHD as well as sexual issues. In a cross-sectional cohort study, 155 male recipients alive 1 year or more after HSCT were assessed during their annual follow-up evaluation. Correlation between genital skin changes and other cGVHD manifestations was evaluated, and post-transplantation sexual contentment and sexual functioning were assessed by 2 self-assessment questionnaires, including the 5-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the modified Brief Sexual Symptom Checklist (mBSSC). Median time between HSCT and genital examination was 5.9 years (range, 1 to 30.3 years). Thirty-one of 155 patients (20%) presented with genital skin changes. Twenty-one of those (13%) presented clinically inflammatory genital skin changes considered as genital cGVHD: 12 had inflammatory (noninfectious) balanoposthitis, 6 had lichen sclerosis-like lesions, 5 had phimosis, and 2 patients had more than 1 feature. Patients with inflammatory genital skin changes had a significantly higher coincidence of oral (P < .0001), ocular (P < .002), and/or cutaneous cGVHD (P < .026) when compared with patients without genital lesions. The rate of IIEF-5 questionnaire response was 59% (91 of 155). Among them, 67% reported erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction was significantly more frequent in patients with genital cGVHD (P = .0075). Seventy-five of 155 patients (48%) answered the mBSSC questionnaire. Only 40% of them reported sexual contentment. Genital skin changes in male recipients after allogeneic HSCT are frequent and seem to be an under-reported relevant late effect. Inflammatory genital skin changes can be considered as a form of genital cGVHD often associated with manifestations of extragenital mucocutaneous cGVHD.
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Classifying cytogenetics in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia in complete remission undergoing allogeneic transplantation: a Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research study.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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Cytogenetics play a major role in determining the prognosis of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, existing cytogenetics classifications were developed in chemotherapy-treated patients and might not be optimal for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied 821 adult patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) who underwent HCT for AML in first or second complete remission between 1999 and 2004. We compared the ability of the 6 existing classifications to stratify patients by overall survival. We then defined a new scheme specifically applicable to patients undergoing HCT using this patient cohort. Under this scheme, inv(16) is favorable, a complex karyotype (4 or more abnormalities) is adverse, and all other classified abnormalities are intermediate in predicting survival after HCT (5-year overall survival, 64%, 18%, and 50%, respectively; P = .0001). This scheme stratifies patients into 3 groups with similar nonrelapse mortality, but significantly different incidences of relapse, overall and leukemia-free survival. It applies to patients regardless of disease status (first or second complete remission), donor type (matched related or unrelated), or conditioning intensity (myeloablative or reduced intensity). This transplantation-specific classification could be adopted for prognostication purposes and to stratify patients with AML and karyotypic abnormalities entering HCT clinical trials.
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Metabolic bone diseases in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: report from the Consensus Conference on Clinical Practice in chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Transpl. Int.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2011
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With improved outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for hematologic malignancies, long-term complications gain greater importance. Skeletal complications such as osteoporosis or avascular necrosis (AVN) occur frequently in allogeneic recipients with a cumulative incidence of diminished bone mineral density of 24-50% between 2 and 12 months after allo-SCT and a cumulative incidence of AVN in as many as 19% of patients 3 years after allo-SCT. Here, we present a review as part of the German, Austrian, and Swiss Consensus Conference on clinical practice in chronic graft-versus-host disease, held 2009 in Regensburg. The Consensus Conference aimed to achieve a consensus on the current evidence of diagnosis, prevention, and therapeutic options of late complications after allo-SCT summarizing and discussing the literature on these topics. In this report, we provide recommendations for metabolic bone diseases agreed upon by the working party. This includes guidelines for diagnosis, prevention, and therapeutic options in patients with low bone mass or AVN.
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Pregnancy after hematopoietic cell transplantation: a report from the late effects working committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2010
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Preservation of fertility after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can have a significant influence on the quality of life of transplant survivors. We describe 178 pregnancies in HCT recipients that were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) between 2002 and 2007. There were 83 pregnancies in female HCT recipients and 95 pregnancies in female partners of male HCT recipients. Indications for transplantation included hematologic and other malignancies (N = 99) and nonmalignant disorders (N = 79, of which 75 patients had severe aplastic anemia). The cohort included recipients of autologous HCT (20 women, 13 men), myeloablative (MA) allogeneic HCT (12 women, 50 men), and nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT (2 women, 2 men). Age at HCT was <20 years for 50% of women and 19% of men. Conditioning regimens included total body irradiation (TBI) in 16% of women and 19% of men; doses were MA in 10% of women and in 16% of men. Live births were reported in 86% of pregnancies in partners of male transplant patients and 85% of pregnancies in female transplant patients, with most pregnancies occurring 5 to 10 years after HCT. We conclude that some HCT recipients can retain fertility, including patients who have received TBI and/or MA conditioning. Young patients undergoing HCT should be counseled both before and after HCT about potential loss of fertility, methods for preserving fertility, and planning for future pregnancy. Fertility and outcomes of pregnancy after HCT need prospective evaluation in large transplant cohorts.
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The outcome of full-intensity and reduced-intensity conditioning matched sibling or unrelated donor transplantation in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first and second complete remission.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2010
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We examined the efficacy of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and compared outcomes of 93 patients older than 16 years after RIC with 1428 patients receiving full-intensity conditioning for allografts using sibling and unrelated donors for Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first or second complete remission. RIC conditioning included busulfan 9 mg/kg or less (27), melphalan 150 mg/m(2) or less (23), low-dose total body irradiation (TBI; 36), and others (7). The RIC group was older (median 45 vs 28 years, P < .001) and more received peripheral blood grafts (73% vs 43%, P < .001) but had similar other prognostic factors. The RIC versus full-intensity conditioning groups had slightly, but not significantly, less acute grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease (39% vs 46%) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (34% vs 42%), yet similar transplantation-related mortality. RIC led to slightly more relapse (35% vs 26%, P = .08) yet similar age-adjusted survival (38% vs 43%, P = .39). Multivariate analysis showed that conditioning intensity did not affect transplantation-related mortality (P = .92) or relapse risk (P = .14). Multivariate analysis demonstrated significantly improved overall survival with: Karnofsky performance status more than 80, first complete remission, lower white blood count, well-matched unrelated or sibling donors, transplantation since 2001, age younger than 30 years, and conditioning with TBI, but no independent impact of conditioning intensity. RIC merits further investigation in prospective trials of adult ALL.
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Diagnosis and staging of chronic graft-versus-host disease in the clinical practice.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
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Based on expert opinion and retrospective data the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Development Project proposed criteria for diagnosis and staging of both overall severity as well as organ severity of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) for use in clinical trials. In 2008, representatives of German and Austrian allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) centers established a study group on cGVHD during the annual meeting of the German Working Group on Bone Marrow and Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (DAG-KBT) to intensify a dialog among HSCT physicians, pathologists, and medical consultants focusing on the usefulness of the NIH consensus criteria for patient care in clinical practice and to promote collaborations between HSCT centers as well as different medical specialities involved in HSCT. We first conducted a survey of current practices of diagnosis, staging, and overall grading of cGVHD in daily clinical routine by sending an electronic questionnaire to the heads of the HSCT centers. During 3 meetings in 2009, more representatives of allogeneic HSCT centers were included into the discussion process, resulting in 81% participation representing 88% of all allogeneic HSCT activities in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. During the third consensus meeting held in Regensburg, Germany, from November 6 to November 7, 2009, important agreements were achieved among participant having a strong impact on care of patients with cGVHD. Areas of disagreement such as distinction between classical NIH cGVHD and overlap syndrome or assignment of liver GVHD after day 100 to acute or chronic category will be further assessed in prospective observational studies among participants in the near future.
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ABO blood group-incompatible living donor kidney transplantation: a prospective, single-centre analysis including serial protocol biopsies.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2009
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ABO incompatible kidney transplantation using antigen-specific immunoadsorption is increasingly performed but data on outcome, complications and protocol biopsies are still scarce. The present prospective single-centre study was aimed at these issues.
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Severe events in donors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell donation.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2009
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The risk for donors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplants is generally considered negligible. Scattered reports of severe complications and a recent controversy on hematopoietic malignancies after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration have challenged this opinion.
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Late effects in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients with acquired severe aplastic anemia: a report from the late effects working committee of the center for international blood and marrow transplant research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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With improvements in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes for severe aplastic anemia (SAA), there is a growing population of SAA survivors after HCT. However, there is a paucity of information regarding late effects that occur after HCT in SAA survivors. This study describes the malignant and nonmalignant late effects in survivors with SAA after HCT. A descriptive analysis was conducted of 1718 patients post-HCT for acquired SAA between 1995 and 2006 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). The prevalence and cumulative incidence estimates of late effects are reported for 1-year HCT survivors with SAA. Of the HCT recipients, 1176 (68.5%) and 542 (31.5%) patients underwent a matched sibling donor (MSD) or unrelated donor (URD) HCT, respectively. The median age at the time of HCT was 20 years. The median interval from diagnosis to transplantation was 3 months for MSD HCT and 14 months for URD HCT. The median follow-up was 70 months and 67 months for MSD and URD HCT survivors, respectively. Overall survival at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years for the entire cohort was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74-78), 73% (95% CI: 71-75), and 70% (95% CI: 68-72). Among 1-year survivors of MSD HCT, 6% had 1 late effect and 1% had multiple late effects. For 1-year survivors of URD HCT, 13% had 1 late effect and 2% had multiple late effects. Among survivors of MSD HCT, the cumulative incidence estimates of developing late effects were all <3% and did not increase over time. In contrast, for recipients of URD HCT, the cumulative incidence of developing several late effects exceeded 3% by 5 years: gonadal dysfunction 10.5% (95% CI: 7.3-14.3), growth disturbance 7.2% (95% CI: 4.4-10.7), avascular necrosis 6.3% (95% CI: 3.6-9.7), hypothyroidism 5.5% (95% CI: 2.8-9.0), and cataracts 5.1% (95% CI: 2.9-8.0). Our results indicated that all patients undergoing HCT for SAA remain at risk for late effects, must be counseled about, and should be monitored for late effects for the remainder of their lives.
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Lung resection in hematologic patients with pulmonary invasive fungal disease.
Chest
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Pulmonary invasive fungal disease is a frequent complication in patients with hematologic malignancies. Surgical resection in addition to antifungal therapy is an option for selected cases but often feared because of immunosuppression.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is curative for selected patients with advanced essential thrombocythemia (ET) or polycythemia vera (PV). From 1990 to 2007, 75 patients with ET (median age 49 years) and 42 patients with PV (median age 53 years) underwent transplantations at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC; n = 43) or at other Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) centers (n = 74). Thirty-eight percent of the patients had splenomegaly and 28% had a prior splenectomy. Most patients (69% for ET and 67% for PV) received a myeloablative (MA) conditioning regimen. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment at 28 days was 88% for ET patients and 90% for PV patients. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) grades II to IV occurred in 57% and 50% of ET and PV patients, respectively. The 1-year treatment-related mortality (TRM) was 27% for ET and 22% for PV. The 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 13% for ET and 30% for PV. Five-year survival/progression-free survival (PFS) was 55%/47% and 71%/48% for ET and PV, respectively. Patients without splenomegaly had faster neutrophil and platelet engraftment, but there were no differences in TRM, survival, or PFS. Presence of myelofibrosis (MF) did not affect engraftment or TRM. Over 45% of the patients who undergo transplantations for ET and PV experience long-term PFS.
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Prospective change control analysis of transfer of platelet concentrate production from a specialized stem cell transplantation unit to a blood transfusion center.
J Clin Apher
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Specialized centers claim a need for blood component production independent from the general blood transfusion services. We performed a prospective change control analysis of the transfer of platelet (PLT) production for hematological patients at the University Hospital Basel from the Department of Hematology to the Blood Transfusion Centre, Swiss Red Cross, Basel in February 2006. We wanted to demonstrate that neither quality nor transfusion outcome was affected.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.